Rural round-up

27/02/2014

Very, very sad and entirely unnecessary – Gravedodger:

Last night on Sky News 10pm nz summer time, a scheduled regular Wednesday Hour featuring resident lefty Graeme ‘Richo’ Richardson and radio jock Alan Jones, Wallaby coach in a previous life, had a harrowing expose on the Bush and its current Drought that has been running over parts of all mainland States for 18 months and continuing.

5000 cattle are dying every day, a grazier/farmer is taking their own life every 4 days, one grazier attempted to sell his last 500 sheep only to be told they were valueless and a sale impossible. He took them back home killed them then took his own life.

Australia is regarded by many, far too many, as too marginal for farming over most of the mainland.
A few salient facts;
Australia currently employs only 6% of the water that reaches the sea.
Immeasurable giga liters are allowed to flow into the Timor  and Coral Seas.
Much water flows from the great divide East while the Bush lies parched to the west.
The town of Cloncurry near Mt Isa was threatened with evacuation until a few weeks respite came in rain that did not solve the problem long term. . . .

5000-10,000 cattle dying in north every day: Katter:

North Queensland MP Bob Katter says anecdotal reports suggest that drought is causing the deaths of between 5000 to 10,000 cattle every day across the state’s north, an area which is home to about one quarter of the national cattle herd.

The Federal member for Kennedy and leader of the Katter Australia Party says $100m in grants, the creation of an Australian Reconstruction and Development Bank and better access for graziers to underground water for irrigation are urgently needed to avert further losses and a dramatic reduction in the region’s future productive capacity.

With producers now enduring their second failed wet season in a row and affordable drought fodder all but impossible to source, many cattle were now dying cruel deaths from starvation, and reports of rural suicides were becoming increasingly prevalent. . .

Mendip fulfilling reverend’s dream – Tim Fulton:

The Reverend Dr Bryden Black is a priest and a businessman. Tim Fulton talks to the vicar about his love for Mendip Hills Station, site of a proposed cadet school.

Mendip Hills Station is being taken by the scruff of the neck, just as the Black family has long hoped.

Bryden Black is keen for his sheep, beef and deer farm near Cheviot to stir young farmers.

His family has been at Mendip since the mid-1950s, either running it directly or under a manager. . .

Family farms are under threat – Stephen Bell:

Family farms will continue to excel as part of New Zealand’s rural landscape, agricultural communicator of the year Doug Avery says.

Passion would keep individual farmers on the land, the Marlborough drylands farmer said.

“You can’t replace passion in anything and people that are working for themselves, with their own vision, have that element that is called passion, which will lead and beat pretty much anything else that corporate structures will throw at us,” he said. . . .

Sheep and beef farmers to vote on genetics investment proposal:

New Zealand sheep and beef farmers are being asked to consider a proposal that would combine Beef + Lamb New Zealand’s current genetics investments and speed up genetic advances.

Beef + Lamb New Zealand Chief Executive, Dr Scott Champion said voting packs were out with farmers now and they were being asked to support the organisation’s continued investment of $2.9 million a year, for the next five years.

“This would be matched by the Government which has already said it will invest $3 million a year if the proposal is supported by farmers,” Dr Champion said. . .

Should agribusinesses fix their interest rates?:

Recent low interest rates have encouraged some agribusiness owners to fix their rates, but that can be a mistake, says Hayden Dillon, Managing Principal, Waikato, for Crowe Horwath. Constantly changing market conditions mean it is crucial for interest-rate hedging to be treated as part of an ongoing strategy.

“Hedging is not a single event,” said Mr Dillon. “Very few businesses remain stagnant and the market never remains stagnant. Having an understanding of the impact of likely significant changes in your business is critical to being successful. And having a clear strategy around exactly what you’re trying to achieve is the first and most important step.”

Because there are a number of often complex financial instruments available, Mr Dillon recommended managing interest rate hedging through an independent advisor who specialised in the field, rather than a banker or accountant. . .


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