Rural round-up

April 16, 2015

Call for Cantabs to think about future of water:

Canterbury would have much to gain from improving its water management practices but needs more information on how land use affects the water supply, Waterways Centre director Jenny Webster-Brown said during a recent talk at Lincoln University.

Almost three-quarters of New Zealand’s total water allocation comes from Canterbury, and current land and water use practices mean the future of the region’s water quality is far from certain, Dr Webster-Brown said.

“The region’s water management challenges have arisen for a unique combination of reasons. The main causes include a reliance on untreated groundwater for drinking, intense agriculture production and the fact that most of the population live in the lower catchments.”

Dr Webster-Brown said while a lot of water is used in irrigation on the plains, urban Christchurch residents go through around 400 litres of water each per day; one of the highest rates of city use in New Zealand or Australia. . .

 Student in take welcome:

A significant lift in numbers of students studying agriculture is overdue and ”great news” for the sector, Beef and Lamb New Zealand chief executive Dr Scott Champion says.

This year, Massey University recorded its biggest intake into agricultural qualifications for at least 25 years.

At Lincoln University, the Bachelor of Agricultural Science and Diploma in Agriculture programmes both attracted 20% more enrolments than last year. Enrolments doubled for the new Bachelor of Agribusiness and Food Marketing and the Master of Science in Food Innovation programmes.  . .

Local government funding reform good news – Dr William Rolleston:

Thank you for the opportunity to speak with you this evening. Federated Farmers has for many years been a strong proponent for reform of local government funding. We particularly support reduced reliance on the system of property rates, which in our view is inequitable from both the redistribution of wealth and the beneficiary pays perspectives.

Overall, rates revenue amounts to around 58 to 60 percent of the local government sector’s total operating revenue.

The difficulty with this system is that it seeks revenue for public goods from only those who own property in the community.  Thus the burden falls disproportionately on those who have relatively high value properties without necessarily the ability to pay. Compare for example rates paid by a super-annuitant living in their own home with a business such as the Warehouse in a provincial centre paying less in rates than an average farm. In fact rates constitute one of the top five expenses in many farming enterprises. . .

Nutrients Are Pesticides: The Dose Makes The Poison – The Foodie Farmer:

Most people find it odd that I am a Registered Dietitian who is licensed as a commercial pesticide applicator. I actually find it quite advantageous because what I studied in my nutrition degrees both undergrad and grad school, applies across multiple biological systems, not just human systems, but soil and plant systems too. Because I have a solid understanding of the science of nutrition, I therefore have a solid understanding of the science of pesticides. Many of the nutrients I studied as an RD, have applications as pesticides.

Paracelsus was correct when he coined the term “The dose makes the poison“. 

First, lets start with some definitions: . . .

 

Mr and Mrs Flowers – Thekitchensgarden:

Yesterday, after milking the cow and feeding the goats and the cows and the big pigs and the little pigs and the chickens of all descriptions, John and I loaded two dog crates into The Matriarchs jeep and went to the Bantam Swap. Do you remember last years Bantam Swap we brought home Godot and Carlos Garcia and the year before we brought home BooBoo and the year before that it was The Duke of Kupa. 

Well this year was just as successful. . .

Fruit and vegetable market ripe with growth opportunities goes up for sale:

A well-known fruit and vegetable market in Napier’s ‘Golden Mile’ – known as the centre of lifestyle, horticulture and market gardens – has been placed on the market for sale.

McKelvie’s Country Market is a long-established, family owned produce business operating from 284 Meeanee Road in Napier. The area is locally known as the ‘Golden Mile’ for its fertile soil resulting in the high quality fruit and vegetables produced and sold. . .

 


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