Rural round-up

March 20, 2018

Sticking with tradition pays off for merino breeders – Sally Rae:

When Jim Hore got his first stud merino sheep, industry stalwart Bill Gibson told him not to mix bloodlines.

He listened to that advice and followed it through, saying the Stonehenge sheep had not really altered over the years, as they had stuck to the traditional.

The Hore family hosted the Central Otago stud merino tour on Friday, with other properties visited during the two-day tour including Nine Mile, Malvern Downs, Earnscleugh, Matangi, Little Valley, Matarae and Armidale.

It also marked a changing of the guard with Jim and Sue Hore’s two sons, Charlie and Andrew, now at the helm of the operation. . .

‘Dark moments’ dealing with cattle disease – Sally Rae:

Since Mycoplasma bovis was detected on their property in July last year, Kerry and Rosie Dwyer have gone through some “very dark moments”.But there had also been some heartwarming and humbling times for the North Otago farmers who voluntarily sent 400 calves to slaughter and now face an undefined period before they can be rid of the impact of the bacterial cattle disease.

Mr and Mrs Dwyer were grateful to their friends, neighbours and colleagues for their understanding and empathy, and those Ministry for Primary Industries and AsureQuality staff who had been practical and hardworking to help them find solutions to “so many problems”.

The couple also thanked the rural contractors and service providers, the meat company and transport companies willing to work with them and the employers and employees who had stuck with them through the process. . .

Berry group hopes for $1b export business – Andrea Fox:

Blueberries will be the foundation crop of a new joint venture between a Maori collective and Government scientists that will use technologies not seen before in New Zealand to grow export berries in non-traditional growing regions and climates.

The 50:50 deal between Miro Limited Partnership, owned by more than 20 Maori trusts and iwi from the Far North to the top of the South Island, and state-owned science company Plant and Food Research, will create a breeding programme for new high-value berry varieties, to be grown, marketed and sold by Miro, with support from BerryCo NZ.

Miro aims to build a business as successful as kiwifruit exporter Zespri.. .

Primary sector exports forecast to rise to over $42 billion in 2018:

New Zealand’s primary industry exports are forecast to rise nearly 11 percent in the year ending June 2018 to $42.2 billion.

This would be the largest annual increase since 2014, according to the Ministry for Primary Industries’ latest quarterly update.

“Our Situation and Outlook for Primary Industries report shows export revenue across all of the sectors has been incredibly strong over the past year, particularly for dairy, meat and forestry,” says Jarred Mair, MPI Policy and Trade Acting Deputy Director General. . .

Major Te Puke kiwifruit orchards marketed to foreign buyers – Paul McBeth:

A block of three kiwifruit orchards in Te Puke is being marketed to foreign buyers, despite the new Labour-led government’s plans to restrict overseas investment.

Bayleys Real Estate is marketing the Te Matai, Pacific Gold and Coachman orchards in Te Puke, spanning 98 canopy hectares in an international tender, closing on May 3, the realtor said in a statement. The three privately owned orchards are on track to produce 1.2 million-to-1.3 million trays of SunGold G3 and Hayward kiwifruit in roughly equal percentages, or about 0.9 percent of Zespri Group’s total supply. That implies payments from Zespri of between $11.4 million and $12.3 million based on the 2017 payment of $9.76 per tray. . .

Eggleston farmer braves Beast from the East to move pregnant sheep – Katie MacFarlane:

FARMERS battled the elements as the Beast from the East brought unrelenting snow and gale-force winds.

Sheep farmer, David Mallon, braved the harsh conditions to move his pregnant Swaledale ewes to a safer part of his farm in Eggleston, Teesdale, just weeks before they are due for lambing.

Mr Mallon, 35, said: “It definitely makes the routine work more difficult and obviously there’s a concern for the safety and welfare of the animals. . .

Good Food Nation bill must empower food producers – Gordon Davidson:

SCOTLAND’S upcoming Good Food Nation Bill is a ‘prime opportunity’ to ensure that food producers are more empowered within the supply chain, NFU Scotland has told politicians.

At a specially orgnaised fringe event at the Scottish Labour Party Conference, the union’s political affairs manager Clare Slipper told delegates: “Retail sales of Scottish brands have risen by 37% in the last few years and internationally, exports of Scottish food and drink products have surpassed £5billion. That is a great success story but, as Scottish farm incomes figures show, there is a disconnect from field to fork.

“The Good Food Nation Bill is an opportunity to address some of the bad economics that are at play within the food and drink supply chain. It is also an opportunity to recognise that in Scotland we also have a looming public health disaster with obesity and health statistics,” she said. . . 


Rural round-up

July 13, 2017

Oritain, GE Healthcare form serum testing partnership – Sally Rae:

Oritain has partnered with global medical technology giant GE Healthcare to run a test-based traceability programme to authenticate country of origin of foetal bovine serum (FBS), used in human and animal health vaccines.

Since its establishment in 2008, the Mosgiel-based company has been a global leader in using forensic science to determine product provenance.

Operations director Dr Sam Lind described the partnership as ”very significant”, not only cementing the work the company was doing within that industry, but also the opportunity to work with such a global company. . .

Productivity and quality pay off for Matarae – Sally Rae:

At Matarae Station, Willie and Emily Jones have a strong focus on development and production.

The couple, with young sons Archie and Digby, lease the 5500ha Strath Taieri property from Mr Jones’ parents, Ron and Juliet, but own the stock.

They said they were running both merino and Romney sheep under ‘‘pretty extreme’’ conditions that could range from a metre of snow to very wet, or as dry as the typical Central Otago climate.

The property was running about 5700 merino ewes, 3800 Romney ewes, 3500 merino hoggets and 1800 Romney and halfbred hoggets, plus lambs, mixed-age rams and about 200 breeding cows. . .

Precision farming the new reality

Craige MacKenzie has seen a lot of technological change since 1978, when he started farming the property he grew up on near Methven.

“The changes haven’t just been in the tools we can use, but also in the industry-wide focus on precision farming, which is all about using IT to ensure crops and soil receive exactly what they need for optimum health and productivity. We’ve tried to take it to a new level.”

Craige and his wife Roz turned a traditional mixed cropping farm into a dairy farm and a specialised seed production operation in 1987.

He has won numerous awards for outstanding farming practice, including: . .

The 25 most innovative at-tech startups – Maggie McGrath and Chloe Sorvino:

When our nation was founded 241 years ago, farming was the economy’s primary driver. By 1870, nearly half of the employed population held jobs in agriculture. Today, it’s a $3 trillion industry – but only 2% of Americans hold a farm-oriented job.

This is, in many ways, thanks to technology. Tractors and other automation advances in the 20th century let large farms shift management to only a handful of people. But this, paradoxically, has also slowed things down in the 21st. With only a few people working every farm, there’s not a lot of time – or incentive – to innovate.

“You only get 40 attempts at farming. From your 20’s to your 60’s, you get 40 seasons,” says Duncan Logan, the founder and CEO of RocketSpace, a tech accelerator company. “In tech, you get 40 attempts in a week.” . . 

Fonterra Announces General Manager, Māori Strategy – Tiaki Hunia:

Fonterra today announced the appointment of Tiaki Hunia to the role of General Manager, Māori Strategy/Pouhere Māori.

As Pouhere Māori, Tiaki will play a vital role in continuing to progress our strategic Māori commitments and strengthen Fonterra’s bicultural capability. He will work across the business, to lead, build and implement our vision of a strong partnership with Māori, growing prosperous, healthy and sustainable communities together. . .

Tractor and machinery industry calls for larger fines for intentional biosecurity breaches:

The Tractor and Machinery Association (TAMA) is praising the Ministry of Primary Industry for finding a contaminated combine harvester imported from the UK but says fines must be a deterrent for intentional biosecurity breaches.

Last week Christchurch company Gateway Cargo Systems Ltd was fined $3,000 by the Ministry of Primary Industries after it declared a contaminated combine harvester imported from the United Kingdom was brand new. An inspection by MPI at the border found it had been used and was heavily contaminated with more than 700 litres of soil and farm waste in the header unit. MPI said it could have caused “incalculable damage” to New Zealand’s environment. . .

 


%d bloggers like this: