Rural round-up

December 15, 2016

Massey to go more practical – Peter Burke:

Veterinary and agriculture degree students who start at Massey University from 2019 will find practical aspects of farming and vet work in their courses right from the start.
And the university is moving to a primary concern with agriculture.

Chancellor Chris Kelly told Rural News that practical studies will start in students’ first year of vet and ag degree courses.

The move on the vet degree course responds to the vet industry saying that though new vets are well qualified academically they lack practical skills, especially for rural practice. . . 

Outcry at ‘sexist’ Massey Chancellor 2/5 comment – Jessica Wilson:

Massey University Chancellor Chris Kelly has come under fire over a comment he made about women veterinary graduates.
Kelly said a woman graduate is equivalent to two-fifths of a full-time equivalent vet.

His comment was made in a recent Rural News article.

Kelly says currently the majority of veterinary students and graduates at Massey University are women. He says women make up 75-85% of vet students in first year and more go on to second year than men do. . . 

Uni boss steps down after female vet remarks:

Massey University Chancellor Chris Kelly is stepping down, after earlier apologising for saying one woman veterinary graduate was worth two fifths of a full-time vet.

Mr Kelly made the comment in an interview with Rural News, published last week.

“When I went through vet school, many years ago, it was dominated by men; today it’s dominated by women,” Mr Kelly told the publication. . . 

Fonterra topping global pizza markets with new investment:

Fonterra takes another important step in its value add strategy today, with the announcement of a new mozzarella plant that will meet growing customer demand for its world-renowned cheese. The introduction of the new $240 million plant ¬ doubling the Co-operative’s capacity to produce its revolutionary individually quick frozen (IQF) mozzarella – will make Fonterra Clandeboye the largest producer of natural mozzarella in the Southern Hemisphere.

Robert Spurway, Chief Operating Officer Global Operations, says demand for this mozzarella out of China and wider Asia continues to grow as more consumers seek out natural dairy products. 

Blueberry season tracking well for Waikato growers – Gerald Piddock:

The season’s first picking of blueberries are in supermarket shelves with the bulk of the fruit ready for harvest in time for Christmas.

It should also see prices slowly start to fall as supply matches demand from blueberry lovers around the country.

The only potential issue was the recent patchy rain hitting many Waikato blueberry farms, which has delayed picking, Blueberries New Zealand chairman Dan Peach said.

Tracing wool from origin to end product  – Annabelle Beale:

WITH a corporate career in information technology and supply chain logistics spanning three decades, Andrew Ross’ recent entry into the wool industry was never going to be without digital disruption.

When helping out on his father’s ultrafine wool property in Guyra, Northern NSW, nearly six years ago, a seed of passion was planted for the Merino wool industry which made him dissatisfied with his corporate life.

His simple ambition to establish an Australian grown and made active and outdoor clothing brand started a complex rewriting of how Merino wool will be sourced and traced in years to come.


Rural round-up

December 2, 2014

Transforming the family farm – Sonita Chandar:

A dairy farm owned by the Treder family in Pahiatua for 100 years is a work in progress and has potential to become a top-performing property.

Michael and Jason Treder own a 50 per cent share in the family farm, with their mother Margaret owning the other half-share.

The farm has never been properly developed as subsequent generations have farmed in the same way. But, the Treders can see the potential to increase production and profitability by investing in infrastructure. . .

Tatua dairy company punches above weight– Andrea Fox:

Tatua is unashamedly big for its boots.

With 100 years under its belt and more often than not the country’s payout leader, the little Waikato company with the outsized reputation isn’t about to pull its head in now.

Chief executive of six years Paul McGilvary states confidently that in the next 10 years Tatua’s revenue can be expected to grow by 50 per cent to $400 million, and its staff by 60 per cent to 500.

And when it fills to capacity its new drier, due to start operating in June next year, Tatua will be on the way to being the world’s biggest producer of dairy hydrolysates. . .

New grass mix at cutting edge:

A new mix of grasses developed at Massey University will cope better in droughts and provide more food.

Agronomist Dr Lydia Cranston says New Zealand farmers have traditionally used ryegrass and clover as a pasture mix, or pure chicory, but as climate changes and droughts become more common and severe, alternative grass varieties need to be considered.

‘Thinking into the future, we’ve got to have alternative options and definitely the results of my study show that both chicory and plantain are good at displaying drought tolerance and continuing to grow under those dry conditions.’

Cranston, who graduated this week with a PhD in plant science, investigated a new herb and legume mix containing chicory, plantain, red clover, and white clover. She found in a glasshouse environment chicory and plantain withstood dry conditions better than ryegrass and clover.

Institute fighting for regional voices – Colin Bettles:

THE Regional Australia Institute (RAI) is “kicking goals” but concerns remain about the medium to long-term future of the independent policy think tank, says chair Mal Peters.

The RAI was launched in March 2012 after being initiated by regional independents Tony Windsor and Rob Oakeshott, part of the $10 billion deal for regional Australia under the previous hung parliament.

According to Mr Peters, the Institute was designed to conduct research into regional issues like agriculture and infrastructure as an “an authoritative and trusted source of information and policy advice”. . .

Aussie fabas risk becoming ‘has bean’  – Gregor Heard:

AUSTRALIAN faba bean growers risk losingN premium markets as a result of segregations that do not meet prescribed industry standards, according to  chairman Peter Wilson.

Mr Wilson is primarily referring to Viterra, one of the major receivers of faba beans in South Australia, which also has a presence in Victoria’s bean producing districts.

Viterra is not storing beans this year, according to Pulse Australia standards, but rather as one segregation for beans of No. 2 standard and above, and one for feed-quality beans. . .

Rosters on farms –  Andrew  Hoggard:

There are benefits to be gained from a ‘five-on, two-off’ roster but you must have a plan in place to maintain productivity I ‘ve had questions put to me like, “Why don’t dairy farm workers work five days just like everyone else?” It is true dairy farms operate seven days a week and some farms, my own included, are starting to run “five on, two off” rosters. Previously, we’d run the common “11 on, three off” roster.

Though that may seem Victorian, it was only the essentials like milking and feeding that were done on weekends. You may be interested in my experiences in the first season I’ve run them.

To do my role as Federated Farmers’ Dairy chair justice, I need a good team to take care of the farm. This means better-than-average staff so “five on, two off” rosters seemed to be a way to make our farm attractive to the staff I both want and need. . .


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