National Poetry Day

July 22, 2011

It’s National Poetry Day.

 The link above will take you to a list of events aroudn the country.
 
Tuesday Poem has three poems for the day at the hub and links in the sidebar will take you to choices of other Tuesday poets.
 
I especially enjoyed The Raspberry-Coloured Hand-Knitted Cardigan by Jennifer Compton and in response to it by Mary McCallum (and her other) –If you buy the raspberry-coloured hand-knitted cardigan and unpick it .
 
Beattie’s Bookblog posts on Eden Tautali who won the National Schools Poetry Award with Nan a moving poem about her grandmother’s funeral.
 
Poems by all those shortlisted and the judges’ reports are online here.
 

Push

May 16, 2011

Push  by David Gregory was  Tuesday Poem’s featured poem last week.

Offerings from other poets linked from the sidebar included:

Conversation Overheard on the Road to Salem by Laura Solomon

A Mothers Day Collage from Elizabeth Welsh

The Museum of Stones by Carolyn Forché

Love the Glove by Mary McCallum


Rembrandt’s Late Self Portraits

March 29, 2011

Rembrandt’s Late Self Portraits by Elizabeth Jennings was featured as last week’s Tuesday poem.

(Yes, I do mean last week, life got in the way of my good intention to post this earlier).

Among others linked in the sidebar were:

Yellow by Mary McCallum.

Clouds Caught on Fence Posts by Clarie Gaskin.

A Series of Titles for Books I Might Write by Saradha Koirala.


This New Place

March 14, 2011

This New Place by Robert McGonigal was last week’s Tuesday Poem.

As always there are other gems from Tuesday poets in the side bar including:

For My Daughter in her Fifteenth Year (for International Women’s Day) by Catherine Bateson.

Maginificence  by Mary McCallum.

Mule Heart by Jane Hirshfield. 

and Orchid Tierney who has 3 x Flashcards  asks what happens when cultural signs and processes become disturbed?


Excerpt from 15 Flower World Variations

March 6, 2011

Excerpt from 15 Flower World Variations by Jerome Rothenberg was featured this week on the Tuesday Poem blog.

Some of the Tuesday poets linked in the sidebar responded to the earthquake:

Songs and Dances of Death by Catherine Fitchett

Storm Front by Helen Lowe

As the Earth Turns by Mary McCallum

Flutter by Brian Turner

Epicentre by Jennifer Compton

Kiwi Heros by Alicia Ponder

this fly – earthquake by Jeffrey Paparoa Holman

Christchurch to Greymouth by Renee Liang

Among some of the other Tuesday poets linked in the sidebar are:

Treasure by Saradha Koirala

Venice by Robyn Rowland


Olduvai Gorge Thorn Tree

February 27, 2011

Discussion on Arts on Sunday between Lynn Freeman and poets Mary McCallum and Jeffrey Papmoa Holman reminded me I hadn’t done my usual post on Tuesday poem.

This week’s feature poem is Olduvai Gorge Thorn Tree by Sarah Lindsay.

Among the links in the sidebar is prose and poetry about or related to the Christchurch earthquake.

InRebuilding Christchurch one sandcastle at a time – Catherine Fitchett posts photos of her daughter’s creative response to the silt.

Helen Lowe has earthquake update and earthquake recovery day 3, day 4 and day 5

Renee Liang writes of the weed mat of humanity.

Helen Rickerby writes on the earthquake.

Belinda Hollyer writes the city of ruins will rise again.

In my city of ruins/tales of Canterbury Tim Jones writes:

. . . In an attempt to do something, anything, to make a difference, we are putting together an anthology of short stories loosely themed around survival, hope and the future. All profits of this anthology will be donated to the Red Cross Earthquake Appeal, or another registered charity aimed at aiding those in need in Canterbury.

The purpose of this Anthology is two-fold—to help financially, but also, we hope, to provide entertainment and alleviation in a time of crisis. We hope that our words will help make a difference. . .

In earthquake – the words, Mary McCallum posts Earth, the poem she wrote after the September 4 quake.

UPDATE: Lou at No Minister has a photo of Olduvai Gorge, the setting for the feature poem.


It’s not only words

February 23, 2011

What do you do when you only have words and words seem inadequate?

If they come from the heart it’s not only words, it’s compassion, comfort and encouragement.

Prime Minister John Key has just held a media conference at which he said:

New Zealanders have woken to a tragedy unfolding in the great city of Christchurch.

The earthquake that struck the Canterbury region at ten to one yesterday has wreaked death and destruction on a dreadful scale.

There is no reason that can make sense of this event.

No words that can spare our pain.

We are witnessing the havoc caused by a violent and ruthless act of nature.

Many people have lost their lives. Families have lost their cherished loved ones. Mates have lost their mates.

These deaths are the greatest loss.

They remind us that buildings are just buildings, roads just roads, but our people are irreplaceable.

Today all New Zealanders grieve for you Christchurch.

To all those who woke up in Christchurch today feeling lucky to be alive, we know that you too are shocked, unnerved and grieving.

We know that your loss is sharpened by fear.

Our minds go to the mothers and fathers comforting children struck by anxiety and disbelief.

They go to the elderly, infirm and isolated who experienced this event alone and who remain blunted by shock.

And they go to each and every Cantabrian who has stoically endured six months of aftershocks, only to be hit by the biggest shock of all.

On behalf of New Zealand let me say to all of you: We feel your pain, as only a small nation can, for none of us feel removed from this event.

I am a proud son of Christchurch. I was raised there, I got my first job there, my sister lives there, my mother died there, I know what a wonderful place it is.

But my connection to Christchurch is no rare thing.

All New Zealanders have a piece of our heart in Christchurch.

All of our lives are touched by this event.

A friend or family member who lives there. A time spent studying there or a memorable experience had there.

We feel connected to your suffering. Your tragedy is our tragedy.

Today I want Christchurch to hear this message:

You will get through this.

This proud country is right behind you and we are backing you with all our might.

The world is with us.

Our Australian neighbours, our British and American friends, the great countries of this world, all are putting their shoulder to your wheel. They are sending their support, their expertise, their people to help us.

Christchurch, today is the day your great comeback begins.

Though your buildings are broken, your streets awash, and your hearts are aching, your great spirit will overcome.

While nature has taken much from you, it can not take your survivor’s spirit.

This devastating event marks the beginning of a long journey for your city.

It will be a journey that leads us from ruins and despair to hope and new opportunities. From great hardship will come great strength.

It will be a difficult journey, but progress is certain, things will get better, Christchurch will rise again.

On behalf of the Government, let me be clear that no one will be left to walk this journey alone.

New Zealand will walk this journey with you. We will be there every step of the way.

Christchurch; this is not your test, this is New Zealand’s test.

I promise we will meet this test.

Today and tomorrow our focus must be on preserving lives, on rescuing those who are trapped and treating those who are injured.

We pay tribute to the hundreds of search and rescue workers, emergency personnel, medical professionals and each and every person who is contributing to this effort.

You are heroes amongst us.

Already the bravery and resilience of Canterbury is on show.

In the weeks ahead our journey will take us to new obstacles, new challenges.

We have a city to rebuild. We have peoples’ livelihoods to restore. We have a community’s confidence to inspire.

We will rise to these challenges.

We will rebuild this city resolutely, and with the conviction that this is what it is to be a Cantabrian, what it is to be a New Zealander.

We are a country of pioneers. Whether we came by waka, sailboat, or aeroplane, we came with the conviction that we could build a new life in this country.

That great pioneering spirit will come to the fore in Christchurch over the coming months and years.

Though lost lives will never be replaced, and though your city will never look the same again, you will rebuild your city, you will rebuild your lives, you will overcome.

We have seen many cities in the world come back from disasters on this scale, and Christchurch will be no exception.

I know that all New Zealanders stand ready to help.

Right now, we can help by rallying around those who are grieving, supporting those whose livelihoods are in peril.

My message to all Kiwis who want to help is – act on that desire.

No act of kindness is too small.

Right now, you can help by offering support to friends and family who are hurting. Offer them a bed or a roof over their head if that is what they need. Make your donations to help those who have been hit hardest.

As infrastructure recovers, your visits to Christchurch will be welcome.

Above all, throughout this journey, offer those affected your love. Know that your humanity is more powerful than any act of nature.

As we look to the future, New Zealanders should know that the Government is going to do everything we can to support the recovery and rebuilding of Christchurch.

We are a resilient nation, and we will not bow down to this challenge. . .

Words too can express what we are feeling and help make sense of the senseless. Poet Mary McCallum writes:

After the last earthquake in Christchurch, I posted a poem trying to haul together what had happened there, and express what I’d seen and read at my safe distance in Wellington. I post it again today – the earthquake in Christchurch yesterday has devastated that city and its people. It was far worse in effect than the one last September, but the stuff of this poem does, I think, hold true, especially the opening lines — and not just for the people of Christchurch but for all of us in NZ at the moment … ‘it mobs us/leaves us/immobile//we are aghast…’ 

You can read Earth here.


Poets

February 9, 2011

Poets by Janet Frame is this Tuesday’s Poem.

Among other Tuesday poems linked in the side bar are:

Taupiri by Robert Sullivan.

Bipolar Opposites Detract by Andrew Bell.

The Way Through The Woods by Rudyard Kipling.

Dating by Mary McCallum.

The Weather Cock Points South by Amy Lowell.


The Physiotherapist’s Piano

January 27, 2011

This Tuesday’s poem is The Physiotherapist’s Piano by Jenny Powell.

Other Tuesday Poems linked in the sidebar include:

Robert Burn’s poem O, Wert Thou in the Cauld Blast chosen by Kathleen Jones who includes a link to a reading of the poem.

Liberty by Edward Thomas.

Growing is Forever by Karlie Markle – an audio visual celebration of nature.

Broken Arm by Emma Barnes.

The Picnic by Sarah Jane Barnett.

Blackberry Picking written and read by Seamus Heaney.

Will You Dance with Me by Renee Liang.

Haiku “spring rain” by Kobayashi Issa.

Poetry is Fun by Susan Landry.

I Saw A J0lly Hunter by Charles Causley.

Clarity by Mary McCallum.

There are more – if you click on the first link you can find the rest yourself.

Love in the Early Winter by Jenny Powell.


Reading Janet Frame

January 12, 2011

This Tuesday’s Poem is Reading Janet Frame by Harvey McQueen, which is part of a tribute to the poet who died on Christmas Day by Mary McCallum who also posted Harvey McQueen RIP on her own blog.

Other tributes from Tuesday poets include:

After the Disaster chosen by Helen Lowe

Tribute to Harvey McQueen by Helen Rickerby at Winged Ink

Harvey McQueen 1934-2010 – an appreciation by Jeffrey Paparoa Holman

Farewell to Harvey McQueen by Saradha Koirala

Tuesday poem to remember Harvey McQueen That Selfsame Song by Thomas Hardy, from Mariana Isara


Why Do We Do What We Do?

December 21, 2010

This Tuesday’s poem is Why Do We Do What We Do by James Brown.

Sarah Jane Barnett who is this week’s editor paired the Tuesday Poets in a poetic version of  ”Secret Santa”  to post a poem or other offering by their ‘partner’ poet.

The results are linked in the sidebar and include:

How She Holds Her Head by Mary McCallum

Grapefruit by Clare Beynon

Cake With Fruit by Therese Clear

Christmas Baubles from Northland by Elizabeth Welsh

The Middle Ground by Belinda Hollyer

Elizabeth and Mary by Kathleen Jones

Kitchen Sonnets by Catherine Fitchett

Albedo by Harvey Malloy

Unnoticed by Harvey McQueen

countadowncountdownAuckland Countdown by Renee Liang

Xmas by Susan Landry

Christ in Aotearoa by Andrew Bell

Nerves by Sarah Jane Barnett

Burning With Joan of Arc by Helen Rickerby

Christmastide by Helen Lowe

Barksoup Winter by Jennifer Compton


To Stuart

December 15, 2010

This Tuesday’s poem is To Stuart by Alistair Te Ariki Campbell.

Other Tuesday poems linked in the sidebar include:

Mary McCallum’s Notorious Veins

Alicia Ponder’s This Way to Grandma’s

And Saradha Koirala plays Whisper Down the Lane – fun with synonyms.


Hunt the Slipper

December 7, 2010

This Tuesday’s poem is: Hunt the Slipper:  a romantic divertissement by Jo Thorpe.

Other Tuesday poems linked in the sidebar include:

Eulogy to Battles Lost  byAlicia Ponder.

The Wahine by Mary McCallum.

Tackling the Day by Pam Morrison.

 Dusk by Melissa Green


Did you see the one about . . .

December 5, 2010

A Thanksgiving Day lesson in political philosophy – Jeff Keren guest posts at Not PC on individual effort vs collectivism.

TVNZ Whizzing through the years – Brian Edwards looks back with the help of YouTube.

Twelve Days of Christmas – Keeping Stock puts a price on the gifts and includes the Irish version of the song.

Movie Economics – Macdoctor and the difference between giving and not taking.

Political crystal ball – the Veteran and No Minister looks ahead to 2011.

And now for something completely different – Food court flashmob does the Hallelujah Chorus at Inquiring Mind.

Welcome to Commissioner Marshall – Stephen Franks on the Police COmmissioner to be.

Uesless information for you – Lindsay Mitcehll on who’s paid for what.

Dulce et decorum est – Monkey with Typewriter on miners.

And a couple I missed from Tuesday’s Poem:

Orphans by Michele Amas – Mary McCallum on losing parents.

Not A Tuesday Poem – Ballad for Molly – Cadence pays a musical tribute to her Scottish grandmother.


Ressurection

November 23, 2010

This Tuesday’s poem is Ressurection by Michael McKimm.

Other Tuesday poets linked in the sdie bar include:

Elizabeth Welsh who went back to her childhood with Travel by Robert Louis Stevenson.

Creaming Before Dawn by Helen Lehndorf – a tribute to Ruth Dalla’s Milking Before Dawn.

Alicia Ponder’s Murdering Poetry.

How She Holds Her Head by Mary McCallum.

And Havery McQueen’s choice – Piwakaka by Jeffrey Paparoa Holman.


Cow Poem

November 16, 2010

Tuesday’s poem goes rural this week with Cow Poem by Chris Mansell.

Other Tuesday poems with links in the sidebar include:

Under the Influence by Mary McCallum.

A Manner of Speaking by Clare Beynon.

Rudyard Kipling’s Smuggler’s Song at An Affliction of Poetry took me back to primary school:

If you wake at midnight, and hear a horse’s feet,
Don’t go drawing back the blind, or looking in the street,
Them that ask no questions isn’t told a lie.
Watch the wall my darling while the Gentlemen go by.
Five and twenty ponies,
Trotting through the dark –
Brandy for the Parson, ‘Baccy for the Clerk.
Laces for a lady; letters for a spy,
Watch the wall my darling while the Gentlemen go by!  . .

Then there’s two which are both sad and powerful:

Vesper Sparrow’s How I died and Harvey McQueen’s Life Sentence.


The Time of the Giants

October 20, 2010

The Time of the Giants by Anne Kennedy is this Tuesday’s Poem.

Among contributions from other Tuesday poets  are:

 Deep Sea Swimming by Pam Morrison at Cadence.

Harvey McQueen’s Reading Janet Frame at Stoatspring.

Sotto Voce by Clare Beynon at All Finite Things reveal Infinitude.

Thanks by W.A. Merwin at Belinda Hollyer.

Savai’i by Mary McCallum, at O Audacious Book.

And Mariana Isara at Type What You See chose Being the Poem from Walt Whitman’s preface to Leaves of Grass.


After Tomato Picking

September 29, 2010

This Tuesday’s poem is After Tomato Picking by Maria Garcia Teutsch.

If you click on the links to other Tuesday poets in the side bar you’ll find other poems including:

Stone is not Stone by Carson McCullers; Mary McCallum’s The Bookshop, Clare Beynons’ Daylight SavingBoys, Please Don’t Rock The Boat by Alicia Ponder and Dutch Interior by Eillen Moeller.


The Moonmen

September 1, 2010

This week’s Tuesday Poem is The Moonmen by Anna Livesey.

Among the links to other Tuesday poets are Taking Liberties On Birthdays by Clare Beynon and The Hospital by Mary McCallum.


In The Desert

July 8, 2010

In the Desert by Stephen Crane is this week’s Tuesday Poem.

Mary McCallum who started the blog discussed it with Jim Mora at the start of  The Panel on Tuesday.

It features a different poem each Tuesday and links in the sidebar take you to other poems and poetic musings.


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