Rural round-up

03/08/2015

Ballance delivers cash to shareholders up front:

. . . Farm nutrient co-operative Ballance Agri-Nutrients has fast-tracked its 2014/15 rebate and dividend payment to get much-needed cash to farmers early.

On 31 July, the co-operative will begin its distribution of an average $60 per tonne, seven weeks ahead of its normal payment schedule. The rebate, averaging $55.83 a tonne along with a 10 cent dividend per share will see a total distribution to shareholders of $76 million – equating to 94 percent of its $81 million gross trading result.

Chairman David Peacocke said today that the co-operative’s solid performance meant it could support its shareholders and move quickly to do so. . .

Mixing style, substance and ambition – Sally Rae:

Chanelle Purser is possibly the most stylish calf rearer in Crookston.

Her fur jacket might usually remain in the wardrobe while she is in the calf shed, but brightly painted fingers dispense milk to hungry charges.

Mrs Purser (42) is somewhat of a dynamo, farming with her husband Phil in West Otago and running a successful retail business in Gore, but she takes it all in her well-manicured stride. . .

Strong demand for good farm dogs – Diane Bishop:

A shortage of good working dogs pushed prices up at the Gore dog sale.

PGG Wrightson Gore livestock manager Mark Cuttance said the top heading dogs fetched $5500 to $5700 while the top huntaways made about $5600 at the sale on Wednesday July 29.

Cuttance wasn’t surprised.

“We expect that sort of money for the top end dogs,” he said.

Cuttance said there was a shortage of good working dogs, because of less shepherds on the land, and vendors saw the Gore dog sale as the perfect opportunity to achieve market value for their dogs in a competitive environment. . . .

Mid Canterbury farmland sold to foreign-owned Craigmore Farming – Jack Montgomerie:

A company associated with a South Canterbury rich-lister has bought more Canterbury farmland.

An Overseas Investment Office decision released on Friday stated the 95 per cent foreign-owned Craigmore Farming NZ Limited Partnership had received approval to buy 83 hectares of land.

Craigmore planned to incorporate the cropping land on New Park Rd, located about 15 kilometres southwest of Ashburton, into its Wairepo dairy farm operation. . .

End the squabbling over free range – David Leyonhjelm:

TO scramble the metaphors, various thin-shelled types are running around like headless chooks over free-range eggs, proclaiming the sky will fall if the law doesn’t tell us all what the term means.

Facts and evidence are as scarce as hen’s teeth, while market forces are disappearing faster than a randy rooster.

The cause is the fact that consumers are increasingly choosing free-range eggs over cage eggs. There are no health, welfare, nutritional or environmental advantages to this. Cage and free-range eggs are no different, although free-range eggs are more likely to be contaminated by chook poo. . .

 Pretty Woman protecting soils:

JULIA Roberts is getting dirty with the aim of helping agriculture.

The Academy Award winner and star of such films as Pretty Woman and Mystic Pizza, has become the latest in a line of international VIPs to call for action to protect soils.

The Hollywood actress has become the newest face of the Save Our Soils initiative, following in the footsteps of several dedicated environmentalists including the Dalai Lama, Bishop Desmond Tutu, activist Vandana Shiva and conservationist Douglas Tompkins. . .

Green dilemma – a GE rice that reduces greenhouse gas emissions – Kiwiblog:

This will pose a dilemma for the Greens. Scientists have developed a genetically engineered rice crop that has significantly reduced methane (the most powerful greenhouse gas) emissions over normal rice.

So if the Greens truly believe their rhetoric that greenhouse gas emissions are the biggest threat to Earth today, surely this means they will drop their opposition to genetically engineered crops and welcome this GE rice?

Nature Magazine reports:

Atmospheric methane is the second most important greenhouse gas after carbon dioxide, and is responsible for about 20% of the global warming effect since pre-industrial times1, 2. Rice paddies are the largest anthropogenic methane source and produce 7–17% of atmospheric methane2, 3. Warm waterlogged soil and exuded nutrients from rice roots provide ideal conditions for methanogenesis in paddies with annual methane emissions of 25–100-million tonnes3, 4. This scenario will be exacerbated by an expansion in rice cultivation needed to meet the escalating demand for food in the coming decades4.  . .

Apropos of which with a hat tip to Utopia:


Rural round-up

04/07/2012

Lifting Maori Business – Sheryl Brown:

Life works in mysterious ways according to Roku Mihinui, chair of Kapenga M Trust, the winner of the BNZ Maori Excellence in Farming Award for Dairy, 2012.

After accepting the Ahuwhenua Trophy on behalf of farm staff and the Trust’s 915 shareholders, Mihinui confessed the 998 cow dairy operation found themselves short of milk for cups of tea at their field day during the competition.

“My daughter was helping with the catering and she asked me where the milk was for cups of tea – we were right beside the milking shed and we had no bloody milk!” The dairy unit is hardly short of milk either – producing in excess of 370,000kg milksolids (MS) this season. Despite the milk mishap and a wet day to showcase the farm, the judges were impressed by the presentation of the property. The Trust beat other finalists Tauhara Moana Trust and Waewaetutuki 10, Wharepi Whanau Trust to take the coveted trophy. . .

Outram breeders win trophy for best carcus – Sally Rae:

Outram Limousin breeders Rob and Jean Johnstone have been awarded the Alan Dodd Trophy for the champion carcass in the annual Otago-Southland beef carcass competition.   

The competition, which attracted 32 entries, was held at the  Alliance Group’s Mataura plant with hoof judging by Mark Cuttance, from PGG Wrightson, and hook judging by Mervyn  Wilson, of the Alliance Group. . .

Animal Welfare Committee annual report:

The National Animal Welfare Advisory Committee (NAWAC) issued its 2011 Annual Report today.

The development and review of codes of welfare was the main focus of NAWAC’s work in 2011. The Transport within New Zealand Code was issued during the year and the Committee finished deliberations on a review of the Meat Chickens Code and a new Goats Code.

The Transport Code covers all animals transported by land, sea or air within New Zealand. It provides clarity about who is responsible for the welfare of animals at all stages of transportation and gives direction about how this must be achieved.

Committee chairman, John Hellström, said the Code has been rapidly adopted by industry since its launch in September.

“It is gratifying to see this code, like the earlier dairy, sheep and beef and pig codes being widely adopted within industry guidelines.” . . .

The report is here.

Blackenbrook First South Island Winery to be Vegetarian Approved:

 Family owned and operated Blackenbrook Vineyard in Tasman, near Nelson is proud to be the first Vegetarian wine producer in the South Island approved by the New Zealand Vegetarian Society.

Blackenbrook’s white and Rosé wines will carry the Vegetarian Society Approved Trademark (see attached photo) which is run under strict licensing criteria from the UK Vegetarian Society. 

The first wines to be labelled with the distinctive logo will be bottled in early August and include Blackenbrook Sauvignon Blanc 2012, Riesling 2012, Pinot Gris 2012 and Rosé 2012.  Next year Blackenbrook Gewürztraminer, Muscat and Chardonnay will be added to this list. . .

Owaka herd manager is Farming to Succeed:

Owaka herd manager, Shane Bichan, says his eyes have been opened to opportunities in the agriculture industry after attending AgITO’s South Island Farming to Succeed programme sponsored by FIL New Zealand.

“It was brilliant, it was an eye opener, I came home on such a buzz. I came away with a new mentor – course facilitator Grant Taylor is an amazing man.

“He talked about turning your blinkers off and seeing what else is out there – I would’ve been happy to listen to him each day even without the farms we visited. . .

Lucky Young Farmer member awarded trip of a lifetime:

AgriVenture New Zealand has teamed up with New Zealand Young Farmers this year to award an AgriVenture scholarship to one lucky NZYF member.

The scholarship is valued at $7000 and includes a fully paid six to twelve month AgriVenture programme to the recipient’s choice of destination country.

AgriVenture gives young people aged between 18 and 30 the opportunity to travel and work on a farm, in horticulture or home management in Australia, New Zealand, Canada, USA, Europe and Japan. . .


%d bloggers like this: