Rural round-up

August 19, 2017

Mayor protests against water tax – Pam Jones:

Central Otago’s economy could lose $6 million a year through Labour’s proposed water tax, a strongly-worded letter from Central Otago Mayor Tim Cadogan to Labour leader Jacinda Ardern says.

Mr Cadogan, who wrote to Ms Ardern yesterday, said Labour’s water tax announcement had been greeted with “fear and dismay” in Central Otago and would be “grossly unfair” on the region.

His letter comes at the same time as a group of Maniototo women are separately preparing a campaign against the water tax. . .

More on water – The Veteran:

Labour, Winston First and the Greens are all committed, to a greater or lessor degree, to imposing a tax on something they don’t own and, in doing so, are opening the doors to Maoridom to demand a slice of the action that they don’t own either.

This policy made on the hoof and with no-one prepared to put a number on it has the potential to severely undermine our agricultural and horticulture industry (and that’s just for starters).

OK, this isn’t an issue for Labour as in their lexicon farmers are all ‘rich pricks’ and they know they are about as welcome in rural New Zealand as a pork chop in a Synagogue. . .

Rebuild slows flock decline – Alan Williams:

The decline in the national sheep flock has slowed markedly over the last year with rebuilding after drought and indicating some return in confidence.

Total sheep numbers were estimated to be 27.34 million on June 30, a 0.9% fall from the 27.58m a year earlier but that figure was a 5% fall on 2015.

Though ewe numbers were lower than a year earlier this year’s lamb crop should be higher, according to Beef + Lamb NZ, largely because more ewe hoggets were mated and the ongoing productivity gains in the flock. . .

TPP agreement will give New Zealand a competitive edge:

A long awaited Trans Pacific Partnership(TPP) agreement can’t come quick enough with approval for a mandate to negotiate good news says Federated Farmers.

The Government announced it will be pushing for minimal changes from the original TPP agreement with a TPP 11 proposal due to go before trade officials from 11 countries at November’s APEC Conference in Vietnam. . .

Bay of Plenty woman wins Young Grower of the Year:

The future of our $5.6 billion horticultural industry is in excellent hands as shown by the talent of this year’s Young Grower of the Year: Erin Atkinson of Te Puke.

Erin Atkinson, 30, technical advisor for Apata Group in Te Puke, was named Young Grower at an awards event in Christchurch tonight after a long day pitting her skills, knowledge and experience against four other finalists. She is the first woman to win the title, which is in its 11th year. . .

Talley’s skipjack tuna gets tick of sustainability:

New Zealand¹s main skipjack tuna purse seine fishery has been certified by the Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) as being sustainably managed.

The certification covers the Talley’s Group Limited (Talley’s) fleet of two large purse seiners, is valid for five years, and allows skipjack to be sold under MSC’s ‘blue tick’ of sustainability. . .

NZ wool market improves at weekly auction – Tina Morrison

(BusinessDesk) – New Zealand wool prices and sale clearance rates lifted at the latest weekly auction.

Some 83 percent of the 8,251 wool bales offered at yesterday’s South Island auction were sold, and prices lifted for all styles of wool on offer with the coarse crossbred wool indicator up 9 cents to $2.82 a kilogram, AgriHQ said. . . 

Significant changes to provisional tax already in effect for farmers:

With the Inland Revenue Department (IRD) unveiling the new provisional tax rules that took effect at the start of this financial year, farmers should be satisfied with sensible adjustments to the rules according to Tony Marshall, Tax Specialist for Crowe Horwath.

The new regime means that if you pay provisional tax using the standard uplift method, which uses the previous year’s liability with five percent uplift, you will no longer suffer high interest if your tax predictions are incorrect. . . 


Rural round-up

December 12, 2016

Alliance manager connected with land – Sally Rae:

Agriculture is in Heather Stacy’s veins, both personally and professionally.

Ms Stacy started work last month in the newly created role of general manager, livestock and shareholder services, at Alliance Group.

Brought up on a dairy farm in Gippsland, a major Australian dairy region east of Melbourne, she had always had a sense of adventure.

“Throughout my life and career, I’ve done a lot of different things,” she said. . . 

Driftwood puts sculptor in her happy place:

Meet Zeus, possibly the quietest stag in Otago.

He is also cheap to keep, does not require feeding and is proving quite a drawcard on his roadside location near Karitane.

Zeus is the creation of East Otago woman Sharon Cunningham, who has been making driftwood animals for several years.

She started with some small pieces, including a poodle, and then progressed to some larger pieces, including a pony, a pig and piglets and a dragon. ‘‘I’m a huge Game of Thrones fan so I had to make a dragon,’’ she said. . . .

Supply-driven global meat markets to put pressure on prices – Rabobank:

· High supply and competitive market expected to push down global meat prices

· China forecast to maintain record levels of pork imports into 2017

· More complex production market forecast, with pressure to mitigate threats including concerns over antibiotic use and greenhouse gases

· New Zealand beef production to remain restricted as a result of herd rebuilding. New Zealand lamb returns are being challenged by a strong currency, despite some improvement in export conditions in some markets. . . .

Lincoln University’s funding cut by $2.4m -John Gerritsen:

The Tertiary Education Commission cut $2.4 million from Lincoln University’s funding earlier this year, official documents reveal.

They show the commission decided the university’s Telford division should no longer be protected from enrolment drops by a funding guarantee introduced after the 2011 Canterbury earthquake.

The guarantee, or funding recovery exemption, ensured Canterbury universities and polytechnics were funded at their pre-quake enrolments even if they enrolled fewer students and it runs until the end of 2018.

The commission’s board removed the exemption from the Telford section “due to its significant under delivery and poor incentives”. . . 

New Chair for NZ Dairy Industry Awards:

The New Zealand Dairy Industry Awards Trustees have chosen Woodville dairy, beef and cropping farmer Ben Allomes as Chair at a recent trust meeting.

Mr Allomes has been a DairyNZ director since 2010 and a supporter of the New Zealand Dairy Industry Awards since he and his wife first entered in 2002.

Mr Allomes and wife Nicky won the Hawkes Bay/Wairarapa Sharemilker of the Year title in 2008 and went on to win New Zealand Sharemilker of the Year. They still have the same sharemilking position they did then, plus an equity partnership, equating to 1300 cows. . . 

New Zealand orange roughy gest top  international sustainability tick:

New Zealand’s three largest orange roughy fisheries have been certified as meeting the international gold standard for sustainable fishing by the Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) (MSC release).

This achievement further demonstrates New Zealand’s commitment to sustainable fisheries management, Deepwater Group Chief Executive, George Clement says.

“This milestone achievement validates the seafood industry’s ongoing investment into sound, scientifically grounded fisheries management and our desire to have our main fisheries recognised as meeting the world’s most rigorous sustainablity standards,” he says. . . .

Orange roughy fisheries certified as sustainable:

Primary Industries Minister Nathan Guy has welcomed certification of several orange roughy fisheries by the Marine Stewardship Council (MSC).

“This is a great success and recognition for a fishery that was in real trouble in the early 1990s,” says Mr Guy.

“A huge amount of work has gone into rebuilding this fishery over the years by industry and successive Governments. To now have it recognised as sustainable by an independent, international body is worth celebrating.” . . .

Potato industry further strengthen biosecurity partnership:

Potatoes New Zealand Inc. (PNZ) today signed an agreement with Government to better protect the potato industry it represents in managing biosecurity.

The industry group became the 14th partner organisation to join the Government Industry Agreement (GIA) for Biosecurity Readiness and Response. The Deed was signed by representatives from PNZ at a ceremony held on a potato farm in Koputaroa. Attendees included PNZ and Government representatives, the Hon Nathan Guy – Minister for Primary Industries and the GIA Secretariat. . . 

Potato industry joins GIA biosecurity partnership:

The potato industry has become the thirteenth industry partner to join the Government Industry Agreement (GIA) biosecurity partnership, Primary Industries Minister Nathan Guy has announced today.

“It’s very pleasing to have Potatoes New Zealand working with the Ministry for Primary Industries and other industry partners on biosecurity,” says Mr Guy.

“It means we can work together on managing and responding to the most important risks like tomato- potato psyllid. . . 

Nominations open for Beef + Lamb New Zealand governance roles:

Beef + Lamb New Zealand is seeking nominations for two farmer director positions and a role on the organisation’s Independent Board Remuneration Committee.

In line with the Beef + Lamb New Zealand Constitution, two electoral district directors will retire by rotation at next year’s annual meeting and they are Andrew Morrison (Southern South Island) and George Tatham (Eastern North island). . . 

Maintaining peat performance – Bala Tikkisetty:

Proper management of peat soils in the Waikato region is a crucial issue for both the profitability of farming and environmental protection, particularly as we head into summer.

A highly productive resource peat soils are, however, a literally shrinking resource as they lose moisture. But the good news is that there are strategies farmers can use to protect them and mitigate the impacts of their use on the environment.

Waikato region has about half New Zealand’s peatlands, some 94,000 hectares containing 2.7 billion cubic metres of peat. . . 

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Rural round-up

September 18, 2014

The most boring bankrupt economic argument–“we export raw logs when we could be adding value and making jobs” : Eye to the Long Run:

The rot set in in the late 1940s on this. Jim Anderton was maybe the first in the modern era to believe we wantonly refused to profit from the blindingly obvious money and jobs to be had from processing timber.

In recent times only Winston Peters has been bright enough to see what the entire business sector has apparently completely missed.

Now, joining him as a value add timber processing expert we have the lawyer from Herne Bay – Mr Cunliffe who has spotted the opportunity.

It is, you understand, not so profitable that any of them would give up their day job… it never is, is it? . . .

Future of red meat promotion under threat – Allan Barber:

Next year’s Commodity Levy Act referendum is one of the factors concentrating meat industry minds on the question of red meat promotional investment. B+LNZ is currently conducting a consultation round with individual meat companies to find out how this critically important, if contentious, topic should be agreed for the benefit of all industry participants.

B+LNZ Chief Executive Scott Champion told me it’s too early to make any predictions about the outcome, at least until after completion of the consultation round at the end of September. With the referendum about 12 months away, the process is geared to providing time to gather enough detail for promotional strategy development before taking this out to farmers to test it in advance of the vote. . . 

New Zealand’s Hake and Ling Join Top 8% of World’s Sustainable Fisheries:

Hake and ling from New Zealand are now among the top 8% of global sustainable fish species after being recognised by the Marine Stewardship Council (MSC).

Each of the three New Zealand hake trawl fisheries, five ling trawl fisheries and five ling long line fisheries have been certified as sustainable against the MSC standard – the ‘gold standard’ for sustainable seafood production.

Only 8% of the world’s wild-capture harvest is certified through the global MSC programme which sets high internationally-accepted standards for sustainable fishing and provides consumers with assurance that MSC certified seafood is sustainable, based on sound, independent science. . .

 

Rural New Zealand wants gigabit equality:

Federated Farmers and TUANZ believe it is essential the next Government delivers better connectivity to rural New Zealand, and is keen to work with them to make that happen.

“We are encouraged by the National Party’s further commitment of $150million, if they’re re-elected, and hope to see a similar commitment from our next Government announced this Saturday” says Anders Crofoot, Federated Farmers Telecommunications Spokesperson.

“Federated Farmers and TUANZ support a Gigabit Agenda for Rural New Zealand that doesn’t leave our productive sector behind. We need to talk about gigabit speeds, where farmers can eventually get their gigabytes as fast as the townies do. . . .

 The right people trained the right way –  Craig Littin:

Our recently released Manifesto talks about building a sustainable farm system giving us the collective means to go forward as a nation.  We can and we will be more than we are today, but to do that we need the right people trained the right way.

Firstly we need to look at what we are trying to achieve. We need to have the young people of New Zealand believing that farming is the attractive career option that it is. We also need to put our money where our mouth is in terms of investing in education, science, research and innovation.

There are some great stories out there of the highly skilled people in our industry who have worked through the agricultural industry to now run multimillion dollar businesses, on very attractive salaries. These opportunities are available to anyone with the enthusiasm, intellect and discipline required to make it in the dairy industry, but we need sound education systems to get the right people into the industry. To do this we need to align the requirements and standards to fulfil job roles with the qualifications offered within primary industry training/education institutes. . . .

Molkerei Ammerland Completes First Sweet Whey Powder Auction on Globaldairytrade:

Sweet whey powder has been sold for the first time on GlobalDairyTrade (GDT), the world’s leading online dairy auction platform, with Molkerei Ammerland selling the product they offered at their first trading event.

Molkerei Ammerland CEO Ralf Hinrichs said the company was pleased with the results from the first SWP online auction.

“Through GDT we have been able to extend our reach to a larger number of customers, and to transact with them much faster. We’re looking forward to using GDT to grow our export market,” he said. . .

Tasman Tanks Appoints Craig Hemmings as Dairy Effluent Sector Manager:

Leading New Zealand and Australian storage tank company Tasman Tanks, has appointed Craig Hemmings as dairy effluent sector manager.

Mr Hemmings brings to his position more than a decade of management experience with nationally and internationally recognised agricultural companies.

As dairy effluent sector manager for Tasman Tanks, Mr Hemmings will oversee the operational management of the company’s dairy effluent division in New Zealand.

“From small beginnings in 1996, Tasman Tanks has built its reputation on designing, manufacturing and installing fully engineered and certified tanks,” said Mr Hemmings. . .

 Central Otago Wine Industry no longer a “One Trick Pony”:

As we have come to expect, Central Otago wines dominated the medals for pinot noir at the 2014 New Zealand International Wine Show, taking out 10 of the 15 Gold Medals awarded. But what is more interesting about the results of this show is that Central Otago wines won medals in a total of 10 different wine categories – Methode Traditionelle, Riesling, Sauvignon Blanc, Pinot Gris, Gewürztraminer, Chardonnay, Dessert Wine, Rose, Pinot Noir, and Syrah.

Now in its tenth year, The New Zealand International Wine Show is firmly established as the largest wine competition held in New Zealand each year. The 2014 New Zealand International Wine Show was judged from 8th to 10th September in Auckland and attracted a total of 2130 entries. Trophies will be awarded at the Awards Dinner on 27 September. . .


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