Homeopathic Farm Support wins Enterprising Rural Women Award

May 26, 2010

Tineke Verkade of Homeopathic Farm Support  won Rural Women NZ’s Enterprising Rural Women Award.

Tineke was the North Island winner. She is pictured (middle) with Judy Bailey who presented the award and Rural Women national president Margaret Chapman.

Flooded roads prevented the South Island winner, Tracey Robinson of Cosy Toes from attending  last night’s award announcement at the Oamaru Opera House..

When the two finalists were announced, there was some controversy over the North Island award going to a homeopathic company. But judges were not looking so much at what a business did as how, and how well, it was run.

Listening to Tineke speaking last night, no-one could doubt her passion and commitment.


Tuesday’s answers

November 10, 2009

Monday’s questions were:

1. What’s distinctive about someone with a variation in the MC1R gene?

2. Who said, “Hollow commitments to action in the future are insufficient. Deferring difficult issues must not be tolerated. Our children and grandchildren expect us to speak and act decisively?”

3. Who won this year’s Prime Minister’s Awards for Literature?

4. What is a titipounamu?

5. Name the national presidents of: Federated Farmers, Rural Women NZ and NZ Young Farmers.

Paul Tremewan got two right, a bonus for originality in his answer to #1 and another for humour in his last answer. If his answer to #2 is satirical he’ll get a bonus for that too.

Paul L gets a bonus for lateral thinking and another for humour.

David W got 2 1/3 plus a bonus for teaching me something with the full answer to #1.

PDM – Mike Peterson chiars what was Meat & Wool NZ and will soon be just Meat NZ. But you can have a bonus for humour.

Tuesday’s answers follow the break:

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Tora Walk walks off with prize

May 18, 2009

 

Tora Coastal Walk, a boutique Wairarapa tourism, venture won the inaugural Rural Women’s Enterprising Rural Woman Award.

The business is run by Jenny Bargh and Kiri and Kath Elworthy.

RWNZ president and one of the judges, Margaret Chapman, said passion for their business, economic success and community contribution were factors which determined the winner. Judges were also looking for businesses which couldn’t operate anywhere other than in rural areas rather than those which happened to operate there.

The award attracted 46 entries and Tora Coastal Walk  was one of three finalists.

“The business has been running for 14 years, but the women’s enthusiasm is still strong.  They live in a very special part of the country and love to share it with others.  They make a special effort to bridge the urban-rural divide, talking to their guests about what’s happening on the farm and making it a total rural experience,” says Ms Chapman.  “Attention to detail and personal touches are an important part of the Tora Coastal Walk and its success.”

Rural Women New Zealand set up the Enterprising Rural Woman Award to highlight the innovative ways women are contributing to the rural economy, and their determination to succeed in the face of the extra challenges presented by the difficulties in accessing technology and geographical location.

The winning partnership won $1500 in prize money and the opportunity to attend a BNZ Women in Agribusiness course.

The runners up were Jan Bolton of Kaingaroa Roading Contractors Ltd, from Murupara and Beverley Forrester of ‘Blackhills’, a paddock to catwalk sheep farming and designer wool operation based in Hurunui, North Canterbury.

The other two judges were Theresa Gattung of Wool Partners International and Amber Quinell from the BNZ, which was the main sponsor for the award.

Rural Women has achieved a lot through this award. It has brought positive publicity for the organisation and the finalists; it’s shown the variety of enterprises rural women are involved in and that business opportunities for women don’t stop at the town boundary.


Enterprising Rural Woman finalists announced

April 3, 2009

Rural Women NZ has announced three finalists for its inaugural Enterprising Rural Woman Award.

They are Bev Forrester of ‘Blackhills’, Jan Bolton of Kaingaroa Roading Contractors Limited and Jenny Bargh and Kiri and Kath Elworthy of Tora Coastal Walk.

The contest attracted 46 entries . The finalists will be judged by Theresa Gattung of Wool Partners International, Amber Quinnell of the BNZ, which is sponsoring the Award, and RWNZ’s National President, Margaret Chapman.


RIP Rural Affairs Ministry

November 18, 2008

Rural Women president Margaret Chapman is upset that the Ministry of Rural Affairs is to be axed.

Rural issues extend well beyond agriculture, and in the past the Minister of Rural Affairs has had an important role to play in monitoring and overseeing a wide range of policies affecting rural communities.

 

“The Minister of Rural Affairs has had an over-arching role, ensuring the rural perspective was factored into health, education, transport, power and land access policies, to name a few,” says RWNZ National President, Margaret Chapman.  “Rural Women New Zealand has also worked with the Ministry to develop a rural impact assessment tool to ‘rural-proof’ government policy.”

 

Absorbing the Rural Affairs role into the Ministry of Agriculture threatens to dilute its effectiveness and lead to policies that fail to take into account broader rural needs at a time when vibrant agricultural businesses and service industries rely on strong communities to support them.

 

“It is vital to provide for the needs of the rural workforce to continue to grow this important sector in the New Zealand economy,” says Ms Chapman.

I agree that rural issues extend well beyond agriculture but we don’t need a separate Ministry with all the associated costs to recognise that.

The Ministry may have ensured the rural perspective was factored into many policies. But that doesn’t mean they wouldn’t have been anyway or that the Ministry of Agriculture won’t be at least as effective an advocate on rural issues.

And the rationalisation needn’t stop with Rural Affairs.

Kiwi Polemicist has a list of 60 Ministries. That seems excessive so given the dire economic outlook a cull would be in order.

Women’s Affairs, Senior Citizens and Youth Affairs would be good places to start, not because there aren’t issues which affect people in these groups, but I don’t believe they need separate ministries to address them.

I’d also be tempted to axe the Ministry of Disability Issues or merge it with Health.

The then Minister of Social Welfare, Roger Sowrey, was asked about a separate ministry of disabilities at an IHC conference in the late 1980s. He replied that while a dedicated Ministry ensured that an area received attention it also provided other Ministries with an excuse to ignore the issues because they were another Ministry’s business.

That’s a valid point. All Ministries should have regard for the affect their policies on everyone and if they did we’d get better policy at a lower cost.


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