Rural round-up

December 18, 2019

Looking after yourself on the farm: Mairi Whittle:

An inspirational mentor and a tragedy have shaped Mairi Whittle’s health and safety focus on the family farm she runs on her own near Taihape.

There weren’t formal health and safety processes in place when Mairi and her brothers were growing up on the 607 Ha sheep and beef farm at Makatote – although she says her parents did instill a strong awareness about ‘no go’ areas.

After studying at Lincoln, Mairi worked in rural banking for five years before heading off for her OE, which included working as a rousie and shepherd in Scotland and as a jillaroo in outback Australia. . . .

Primary exports to reach $48bn in 2020 – MPI:

Primary sector exports are forecast to lift more than 3 percent, according to the Ministry for Primary Industries’ latest quarterly situation and outlook report.

The report, released yesterday, predicts primary industry exports will reach nearly $48 billion for the year to June 2020.

That would be a rise of more than 3 percent on the previous financial year and was an improvement from MPI’s October forecast, which predicted the value of exports would drop by 0.1 percent. . .

Laura Vincent deserves a nice juicy steak – Cactus Kate:

Some poor woman called Laura Vincent has gone to the hell that is tasting “fake meat” for us.

I cannot think of anything more ghastly than being force fed fake meat.  Some real meat is bad enough.  If I am going to put calories into my body these days then I am not going to waste it with anything that is not delicious.

There are predictions that this will be all that people will eat in 50 years time. It is another reason that I am opposed to extending ones life beyond an average span.

The sorts of people who think “fake meat” is great are against genetic modification for everything else.  Dutifully forgetting that they are shoving half a lab down their throats when tasting this muck.  They seems to want to reproduce the smell, taste and texture of meat when many say they dislike all those qualities of meat. . .

Stalwart stickler for tradition – almost – Daniel Birchfield:

It is perhaps no surprise that the woman who is one of the driving forces behind Waimate’s annual Strawberry Fare loves everything about the fruit the event celebrates.

Strawberry Fare organising committee chairwoman Joy McIvor, of Waimate, prefers her strawberries the traditional way — with “cream and some icing sugar”.

However, she also does not mind them dipped in chocolate.

Mrs McIvor, who has been on the committee for 18 years, the past 15 as chairwoman, had little time to sample the fruit on Saturday, as she was hard at work making sure the event, staged at Boland Park and Seddon Square, ran smoothly. . .

Primary Sector Council merges science with the metaphysical in vision to guide the food and fibre sector – Point of Order;

The Primary Sector Council’s vision for the country’s vital food and fibre sector (you can check it out here) promotes the government’s programme for blending science with the Maori belief system.

In a press statement, Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor welcomed the “vision to unite the primary sector”, although he did not mention advice to unite science with matauranga Maori.

But on the vision website we learned: . . .

Once a day milking:

Once-a-day (OAD) milking is the practice of milking cows only once during a 24 hour period. This differs from the traditional twice-a-day (TAD) milking regime.

OAD milking can be used either strategically (long-term) as the overall farming system or tactically as a short-term response to adverse seasonal conditions.

Reasons to consider OAD milking

There are a number of reasons to consider OAD, the advantages of which will depend on the current farm system or layout e.g. long distances walked by cows. . .

Rural recycling rates soar, but more solutions needed:

Rural recycling has seen unprecedented gains, with rates soaring to 43 percent above last year’s figures. The programme responsible for these results supports government proposals to rethink plastics but says there is an urgent need for local recycling solutions to generate greater recycling rates for a wider selection of rural plastics.

If a wider variety of plastic can be recycled, less plastic waste will build up in rural areas and fewer harmful practices, such as burning and burying, will be deployed to dispose of it. This will benefit our environment and our wildlife. . .


Rural round-up

July 17, 2019

New Zealand’s future food for thought :

Dr Jocelyn Eason, General Manager of Science and Food Innovation at Plant & Food Research, believes the future is green. And probably crunchy. But most definitely packed with nutrients.

Eason, who manages 140 scientists in the Food Innovation Portfolio at Plant & Food Research, believes the future of food lies in plants – and that New Zealand has both the scientific capability and growing expertise to be globally competitive in a plant-based food market. That means optimising plant genetics, developing future growing systems and capturing an eco-premium for new food products.

“The goal for us is to add value at each step of our food value chain. What does the market want?” That, she says, means looking at the consumption of the consumers of the future: Teenagers (GenZ). . .

Living in fear of farmageddon – Brian Fallow:

Will Farmageddon flow from the Reserve Bank’s plans to require some seismic strengthening of banks’ balance sheets?

Some of the submissions it has received in its review of bank capital requirements make sobering reading, especially about the impact on the dairy sector.

So first, some numbers. Bank lending to the agricultural sector has climbed from $12 billion in 2000 to $63b now — two-thirds of it to the dairy sector. It works out at $8300 per cow. . .

Scientists confident well-bred cows won’t burp – Michelle Dickinson:

Meat and dairy are New Zealand’s biggest earners when it comes to exports, however, they are also our largest contributor to greenhouse gas emissions. As we try to balance our economy with our commitment to the Paris climate agreement new research out this week thinks the secret to reducing climate change could be through breeding less burpy cows.

Methane emissions from ruminants including sheep and cows account for about a third of New Zealand’s greenhouse gas emissions and are by far the largest single contributor. Although methane stays in the atmosphere for less time than carbon, as a gas it is much more effective at trapping heat – acting as a blanket over our planet and playing a significant role when it comes to climate change. . .

You can’t blame Westland’s farmers for selling out – Mike O’Donnell:

Lee Iacocca died last week. One of the original rock stars of the car industry, Iacocca is credited with being the father of the Ford Mustang in 1964, considered the most iconic muscle car in automotive history.

The Mustang become immortalised in books, songs and movies – including Bullitt and Gone in 60 Seconds.

After being dumped by Ford, 15 years later Iacocca was credited as the man who saved Chrysler from going under by securing a US$1.5 billion government loan and paying it back within three years. . .

Farmers willing to pay big money for the best working dogs – Esther Taunton:

Heading dog Jack wrote himself into the history books on Thursday when he sold for a record $10,000 at an auction in Canterbury.

While it was a price fit to make townie eyes water, New Zealand Sheep Dog Trial Association president Pat Coogan said a good dog would be worth every dollar.

“The price farmers are willing to pay for a good dog has increased dramatically over the last 10 years,” he said. . .

FAST FIVE: Detroit Ririnui

Detroit Ririnui grew up in Welcome Bay in Tauranga where his family are in the kiwifruit industry but it wasn’t something he enjoyed very much. 

However, growing up in a rural environment instilled a love of the land so after a few years of working in the family business he made the decision to switch to dairying and says it was something he had always wanted to try.

He asked a relative if he knew of any dairy farm work and he told him he would give him a job in Invercargill. He made the move south where he is a farm hand on a 350-cow farm about a year ago and says he loves it.  . .


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