Rural round-up

07/09/2021

B+LNZ remains unconvinced by low-slope map :

The Government’s new proposed low-slope map for stock exclusion is better than the original, however the map still won’t practically work on the ground, says Beef+Lamb New Zealand (B+LNZ).

The Government is consulting on a revised map after the original mis-identified thousands of hectares of steep land across New Zealand as ‘low-slope’ and therefore requiring stock exclusion or fencing.

It is also consulting on a proposed certified freshwater farm planning approach. B+LNZ has released factsheets outlining key issues and guidance for farmers on both consultations and will be making submissions incorporating farmer feedback.

It will also be making a submission on the changes to the intensive winter grazing rules announced last week. . . 

NAIT  tackles lifestyles – Annette Scott:

Lifestylers have become a key focus for Ospri as it ups the efficiency of the national animal identification tracing (NAIT) programme.

Ospri head of traceability Kevin Forward says a lot of lifestyle properties now border farms and it’s important these property owners understand their responsibility when it comes to owning animals.

Real Estate New Zealand statistics show more than 7000 lifestyle properties change hands every year.

Whether you have a dozen animals or even just one, as person in charge of animals (PICA) there is a legal obligation to register with Nait and keep your account up-to-date if managing NAIT animals. . .

Careful paddock selection first step in winter forage crop programme :

Wintering practices have changed on Robert Young’s Southland farm over the past 10 years.

A continual process of fine-tuning the management of their winter forage crops to protect their soil and water resources is paying dividends, with less mud, reduced run-off and content livestock.

Robert and his family farm a 970ha rolling to steep sheep, beef and dairy support property near Gore.

Winter forage crops, namely fodder beet and swedes, are an important part of their farm system; both as part of their pasture renewal programme and to grow a bulk of quality feed for sheep and cattle over the depths of winter. . . 

AGL’s Nelson plant rolls out covid-19 vaccines :

Alliance Group Ltd’s Nelson plant is rolling out covid-19 vaccinations to staff and immediate family members within their “bubble”.

Sixty-nine workers and 10 of their family members received their first covid-19 vaccinations at the plant on Thursday in a joint initiative between Alliance and Te Piki Oranga Ltd, a local Māori healthcare provider. Approximately 40 employees at the plant have already been vaccinated.

Te Piki Oranga staff worked with the Nelson plant’s health and safety manager Sheryl Edwards to provide the immunisations at the plant. The second of the two vaccinations required will be provided at the plant in six weeks’ time.  . . 

FarmIQ appoints respected ago-leader as its new chairman:

FarmIQ is ‘bringing it all together’ with the announcement of Warren Parker as Chairman of its Board of Directors.

Warren brings a wealth of knowledge and experience in agricultural systems, farm management, and governance while also being experienced in working effectively with government.

His vision for FarmIQ in the next five years is founded on this experience and the increased market and compliance expectations placed on farmers, “It has all the ingredients and ambition necessary to become the national leading software choice for land managers in New Zealand and will have grown its presence internationally.”

FarmIQ can only achieve this by being a good partner, respectful collaborator and admired for its practicality but he says “there is a lot to do but I’m excited by the high caliber of their people and their enthusiasm to help farmers.” The power of a platform approach is other software providers can offer their tailored solutions while farmers need to enter data only once. This is well proven in the banking and other sectors, and there is no reason it cannot be just as successful in the rural sectors. . .

Beef giant Brazil halts China exports after confirming two mad cow disease cases – Nayara Figueiredo:

Brazil, the world’s largest beef exporter, has suspended beef exports to its No. 1 customer China after confirming two cases of “atypical” mad cow disease in two separate domestic meat plants, the agriculture ministry said on Saturday.

The suspension, which is part of an animal health pact agreed between China and Brazil and is designed to allow Beijing time to take stock of the problem, begins immediately, the ministry said in a statement. China will decide when to begin importing again, it added.

The suspension is a major blow for Brazilian farmers: China and Hong Kong buy more than half of Brazil’s beef exports.

The cases were identified in meat plants in the states of Mato Grosso and Minas Gerais, the ministry said. It said they were the fourth and fifth cases of “atypical” mad cow disease that have been detected in Brazil in 23 years. . . 


March 25 in history

25/03/2010

On March 25:

1199 Richard I was wounded by a crossbow bolt while fighting France.

1306 Robert the Bruce became King of Scotland.

1347 Catherine of Siena, Italian saint, was born.

1409 The Council of Pisa opened.

1584 Sir Walter Raleigh was granted a patent to colonize Virginia.

 

1634  The first settlers arrived in Maryland.

1655 Saturn‘s largest moon, Titan, was discovered by Christian Huygens.

1802 The Treaty of Amiens was signed as a “Definitive Treaty of Peace” between France and Britain.

Gillray - The First Kiss.jpgJames Gillray, The first Kiss this Ten Years! —or—the meeting of Britannia & Citizen François (1803)

1807 The Slave Trade Act became law, abolishing the slave trade in the British Empire.

1807 – The Swansea and Mumbles Railway, then known as the Oystermouth Railway, became the first passenger carrying railway in the world.

 

1811 Percy Bysshe Shelley was expelled from the University of Oxford for his publication of the pamphlet The Necessity of Atheism.

1821 Greeks revolted against the Ottoman Empire, beginning the Greek War of Independence.

Epanastasi.jpg

1847 Duel between Dr Isaac Featherston, editor of the Wellington Independent, and Colonel William Wakefield, the New Zealand Company’s Principal Agent in New Zealand.

Wakefield and Featherston duel

1881 Mary Gladys Webb, English writer, was born.

 1894  Coxey’s Army, the first significant American protest march, left Massillon, Ohio for Washington D.C.

 

1897 John Laurie, Scottish actor, was born.

 

1899 Burt Munro, New Zealand motorcycle racer, was born.

 

1903 Racing Club de Avellaneda, one of the big five of Argentina, was founded.

Racing Club's Crest

1908 Clube Atletico Mineiro was founded in Belo Horizonte, Brazil.

Atlético Mineiro

1911 In New York City, the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire killed 146 garment workers.

 People and horses draped in black walk in procession in memory of the victims.

1913 Sir Reo Stakis, Anglo-Cypriot hotel magnate, was born.

 

1914 Norman Borlaug, American agriculturalist, recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize, was born.

1917 The Georgian Orthodox Church restored its autocephaly abolished by Imperial Russia in 1811.

Georgian Apostolic Autocephalous Orthodox Church logo.gif

1918 The Belarusian People’s Republic was established.

1922 Eileen Ford, American model agency executive, was born.

1924  On the anniversary of Greek Independence, Alexandros Papanastasiou proclaimed the Second Hellenic Republic.

1934 Gloria Steinem, American feminist and publisher, was born.

1937 Tom Monaghan, American fast-food industry entrepreneur, was born.

Dominos pizza logo.svg

1939 Cardinal Eugenio Pacelli beccame Pope Pius XII.

Pacelli12.jpg
   

1940 John A Lee was expelled from the Labour Party.

John A. Lee expelled from Labour Party

1941 The Kingdom of Yugoslavia joined the Axis powers with the signing of the Tripartite Pact.

E-tripartite-pact.jpg

1942 Aretha Franklin, American singer, was born.

1947  An explosion in a coal mine in Centralia, Illinois killed 111.

1947 Elton John, English singer and songwriter, was born.

1948  The first successful tornado forecast predicted that a tornado would strike Tinker Air Force Base, Oklahoma.

Damage to United States Air Force bombers from the first tornado.

1949  The March deportation was conducted in Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania to force collectivisation by way of terror. The Soviet authorities deported more than 92,000 people from Baltics to remote areas of the Soviet Union.

 “Enemies of the people”: 72% of deportees were women and children under the age of 16

1957  United States Customs seized copies of Allen Ginsberg‘s poem “Howl” as obscene.

 

1957  The European Economic Community was established (West Germany, France, Italy, Belgium, Netherlands, Luxembourg).

1958  Canada’s Avro Arrow made its first flight.

1960 Steve Norman, British saxophonist (Spandau Ballet), was born.

1960 Peter O’Brien, Australian actor, was born.

1965  Sarah Jessica Parker, American actress, was born.

 

1965  Civil rights activists led by Martin Luther King, Jr. successfully completed their 4-day 50-mile march from Selma to the capitol in Montgomery, Alabama.

 

1969  During their honeymoon, John Lennon and Yoko Ono held their first Bed-In for Peace at the Amsterdam Hilton Hotel (until March 31).

1971 Beginning of Operation Searchlight of Pakistan Army against East Pakistani civilians.

1975 Faisal of Saudi Arabia was shot and killed by a mentally ill nephew.

The image above is proposed for deletion. See files for deletion to help reach a consensus on what to do.

1979  The first fully functional space shuttle orbiter, Columbia, was delivered to the John F. Kennedy Space Center to be prepared for its first launch.

Space Shuttle Columbia

1988  The Candle demonstration in Bratislava – the first mass demonstration of the 1980s against the communist regime in Czechoslovakia.

1992  Cosmonaut Sergei Krikalev returned to Earth after a 10-month stay aboard the Mir space station.

Sergei Konstantinovich Krikalev.jpg

1995  The world’s first wiki, a part of the Portland Pattern Repository, was made public by Ward Cunningham.

 

1996  An 81-day-long standoff between the anti-government group Montana Freemen and law enforcement near Jordan, Montana, began.

1996  The European Union’s Veterinarian Committee bans the export of British beef and its by-products as a result of mad cow disease (Bovine spongiform encephalopathy).

 

2006  Capitol Hill massacre: A gunman killed six people before taking his own life at a party in Seattle’s Capitol Hill neighborhood.

2006 Protesters demanding a new election in Belarus following the rigged Belarusian presidential election, 2006 clashed with riot police. Opposition leader Aleksander Kozulin was among several protesters arrested.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


Please Give blood – I can’t

12/06/2008

A friend encouraged me to become a blood donor when I was at high school and I continued more or less regularly for several years.

The day our daughter was born, a donation from someone else saved both our lives. The nurse who was setting up the transfusion mentioned AIDS then said – but don’t worry we only give blood from women to pregnant mothers. Ah yes, that seems most peculiar now but this was 1985 before blood was routinely screened.

Anyway, whoever gave the blood, it was fortuantely free from any infection because once I stopped breast feeding I became a donor again in between subsequent preganancies and feeding.

That all stopped several years ago though when anyone who had been in Britain for more than 6 months in the 1980s was precluded from being a donor for fear of transmitting Mad Cow Disease.

I don’t remember eating beef when I was in Briatin – we lived on tinned tomatoes becasue they were cheap – but regardless of that I can’t be a donor anymore.

Tomorrow is Blood Donor Day – I hope those who can will give because,  as the advertisement says the life you save might be your own.


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