Rural round-up

August 20, 2019

Billion Trees policy ‘spells end of farming’ – Steve Carle:

You can make almost double just by shutting up your farm and not worrying about production in forestry if sheep and beef farmers convert to carbon sink farming, says Makairo farmer Lincoln Grant.

“It spells the end of farming in the Tararua District at this stage but its all dependent upon Government policy,” he says. “You’re at the mercy of it. The disturbing thing about selling New Zealand farmland to foreign countries to plant trees to claim carbon credits is that they will take the profit from the carbon credits back offshore. They will leave us with absolutely nothing.

“The medium to long-term effect for New Zealand is just dire from that. With stumps and slash, 150 years of fencing and tracking will be completely lost — it will be all ruined. To start from scratch with a pine forest it would never be economic to turn it back into a sheep and beef farm again. . .

NZ’s agriculture GHG policy working against us – John Jackson:

New Zealand’s Action on Agricultural emissions places us all in a very uncomfortable situation.

I’m no earth or space scientist, nor do I hold a particular view on who or what is responsible for global warming.

Given that most statistics indicate a warming change is happening, we should consider this a given.

So whether global warming is indeed anthropogenic or just a naturally occurring phenomenon, our approach to stabilising the environment in which we live should be the same. . .

Strong wool deserves a future – Nick Brown:

With growing concerns over climate change, why are we still using nylon pile carpets, when wool is much better for the environment?, writes Nick Brown, Taranaki Federated Farmers Meat & Wool Chairman.

As a new parent, travelling with a baby in Europe, the first thing I do when I go anywhere is scope the joint for the softest, safest surface for my child’s immersion on the bacteria-laden floors.

Floors never used to interest me. For most of us, we don’t take much notice of what we are walking on, be it wood tiles, lino, or synthetic or woollen carpet.

But people are becoming more aware, and are demanding transparency of what’s in their products. It won’t be long until they turn their attention to what’s beneath their feet.

Emissions profile for every farm – Sudesh Kissun:

All Fonterra farms will get a unique report about their biological emissions within 15 months.

The co-op says it will provide emissions profiles of its 10,000 supplier farms using data the farmers provide annually.

The profiles will be similar to nitrogen reports provided to Fonterra farmers for the past six seasons. They will be free and farmers will not be required to provide extra information or have a farm audit.

The dairy co-op believes on farm reporting will help show its leadership and progress against external targets. . .

Vegan food’s sustainability claims need to give the full picture – Maartje Sevenster & Brad Ridoutt:

The IPCC special report, Climate Change and Land, released last night, has found a third of the world’s greenhouse gas emissions come from the “land”: largely farming, food production, land clearing and deforestation.

Sustainable farming is a major focus of the report, as plants and soil can potentially hold huge amounts of carbon. But it’s incredibly difficult as a consumer to work out the overall footprint of individual products, because they don’t take these considerations into account.

Two vegan brands have published reports on the environmental footprint of their burgers. Impossible Foods claims its burger requires 87% less water and 96% less land, and produces 89% fewer greenhouse-gas emissions than a beef version. Additionally, it would contribute 92% less aquatic pollutants. . . .

The floating farm produces, processes and distributes dairy products in Rotterdam:

Dutch architecture company goldsmith has designed the world’s first floating farm in rotterdam (see previous coverage here and here) as an agricultural building based on nautical principles. the farm, which produces, processes and distributes dairy products in the city, is aimed at bringing producer and consumer closer together, and adding to shorter supply chains and awareness of urban residents.

Through the process of scale enlargement, and the automation of activities, the harbor of rotterdam shifts to the west of the city, and the border between harbor and city shifts accordingly,’ explains goldsmith. ‘consequently, the decline of traditional trade activities make room for residential – and other urban developments. the harbor economy with its corresponding trading dynamics is disappearing from the basins; the original contrast between the relatively calm residential landscape and the lively center point for trade is revolving 180 degrees; the basins of the merwehaven threaten to become open and empty spaces in a densifying urban landscape of the merwe-vierhaven (m4h) area. with the floating farm dairy these beautiful, but slowly orphaned spaces, find meaning in a rapidly changing environment through the introduction of urban farming.’ . . 


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