Foreign ownership boosts wages:

05/09/2014

Trans Tasman on foreign ownership:

The proposed sale of the 13,800ha Lochinver Station, near Taupo to Shanghai Pengxin, which bought the Crafar Farms in a joint venture with Landcorp, reignited the political debate about foreign investment and purchases of Kiwi land. Labour has promised to block the sale if it is not approved before the September 20 election and stop land sales over 5ha except in rare circumstances. Finance spokesman David Parker says land sales to foreigners do not increase output and do not release capital to be reinvested by the NZ owner to create new jobs. Finance Minister Bill English, however, reckons the Govt has struck the right balance between attracting foreign investment and tightening the rules for overseas investment in sensitive land.
Public Disquiet. Chinese investors have been making other investments in the farm sector: they have a minority stake in Blue Sky Meats and the Overseas Investment Office is considering an application to buy Prime Range Meats. Farm leaders have become disquieted. Federated Farmers supports positive overseas investment in NZ’s farming system but is concerned there would be little benefit to NZ if the Lochinver deal is clinched. President William Rolleston says “NZ absolutely needs foreign investment” but only if it benefits the local and national economy. He wants a “substantial and identifiable” benefit test incorporated in overseas investment eligibility criteria. Public opinion survey results this week suggest a majority of voters similarly approve of farm sales to foreigners only when it brings a significant advantage over an NZ buyer such as jobs. Almost 33% want farm sales to foreigners banned.

National raised the already high hurdle foreign buyers have to jump before a purchase is approved and benefits above and beyond those sales to domestic buyers would provide is one of the criteria.

 Better For Workers. An upcoming working paper by Motu Economic and Public Policy Research economists throws some light on the economics by examining how employment in foreign-owned firms affects NZ workers’ earnings. Using data from Statistics NZ’s Integrated Data Infrastructure, which tracks workers as they move between firms, the researchers found workers in foreign firms tend to receive, on average, around 14% higher monthly starting earnings than workers in domestically-owned firms. Compositional differences are the main explanation: foreign firms tend to be bigger and employ workers who would have received relatively high wages regardless of where they worked. The authors also found under-25 year olds get greater gains from joining a foreign firm and smaller losses on exit than older groups, while more highly skilled workers attract a stronger wage premium while working in the foreign-firm sector. In short, foreign firms not only tend to hire more highly skilled workers; they also remunerate these workers more generously.

A very small percentage of land  – around 2% – is in foreign ownership now.

The problem is one of perception based on emotion taking no account of the facts and benefits which include better wages for staff employed by foreign owners.


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