Rural round-up

May 12, 2016

Gentle giants deliver the meat – Kate Taylor:

A Pahiatua farmer is pleased his family dairy farm is still in the family because it allows him to enjoy his passion for south devon cattle. Kate Taylor paid him a visit.

Pahiatua south devon breeder Mark Eagle talks enthusiastically about the temperament of his “gentle giants”.

We pride ourselves on breeding cattle with quiet temperaments and a decent strong, meaty carcass,” he says.

Mark and Di Eagle and their Kaimoa South Devon Stud can be found on the 230-hectare Chessfield Farm in the Mangaone Valley about 11 kilometres south east of Pahiatua. Their annual bull sale is on May 23. . .

Farmers think about the future at Federated Farmers Southland meeting – Brittany Pickett:

Primary industries production remains crucial in Southland’s future.

That was the message given to farmers at the Federated Farmers annual meeting on Wednesday at Bill Richardson Transport World.

Speakers and leaders had farmers thinking about what farming in Southland would be like within the next 10 years.

Southland Federated Farmers president Allan Baird said his desire for the future would be to have a healthy environment alongside a growth in production. . . 

Views on animal welfare heard across the country:

Close to 500 people attended six public meetings across the country, to express views on animal welfare.

MPI is currently seeking feedback on 85 proposed animal welfare regulations and took to the road as part of the five week consultation. The proposals set out tougher rules around animal management and would put new fines and infringements in place.

Director of Biosecurity and Animal Welfare Julie Collins has been pleased with the amount of feedback MPI had received to date. . . 

Solar powered pump sells to 20 countries:

A central Hawke’s Bay company has signed a deal to sell its solar powered water pump in 20 countries.

Isaacs Electrical launched its ePump last December, and strong demand nationally and internationally has led to it signing a major distribution partnership with Waikato Milking Systems.

The ePump can pump up to 20 litres of water per minute in daylight hours, and for a distance of up to 120 metres, making it ideal for use in remote locations. . . 

Waikato forum: what dairy can learn from kiwifruit crisis:

Dairy farmers facing the industry’s lowest milk price in years will this month hear lessons learnt by the kiwifruit industry when Psa struck in 2010.

“We are different industries, but we are still people. One looks after animals, one looks after plants – but we are people, we have passion, we have drive, we earn our income and live our lifestyles this way,” says Ian Greaves, kiwifruit industry representative.

The kiwifruit vine disease, Psa, devastated all Gold kiwifruit orchards across the Bay of Plenty but also affected Green, with many growers only now getting their first or second crop since it occurred. . . 

Battle for our birds 2016:

The largest pest control operation in New Zealand’s history will be launched this winter in response to a pest plague which threatens vulnerable native wildlife, Conservation Minister Maggie Barry says.

Battle for our Birds 2016 will receive $20.7 million in new operating funding for 2015/16 from this month’s Budget, helping to fight back against an expected pest population boom caused by a heavy forest seeding, or mast.

“DOC scientists have confirmed the seed fall predicted last year has eventuated,” Ms Barry says. “We must respond if we’re to protect our native birds and animals from the threat – and the funding will enable DOC to achieve this.”

This autumn around a million tonnes of beech seed will drop to the forest floor, providing a bonanza of food for rats and causing their population to boom.

“As rats increase due to the readily-available food source, so will the number of stoats which feed on rats,” Ms Barry says. “Once the seeds germinate and the food source disappears in early spring, the plague of millions of starving rats and tens of thousands of hungry stoats will turn on native wildlife, bringing disaster if we do nothing.” . . 

Welcome to New Trustee from Rural Women NZ:

This months meeting of NZ Landcare Trust’s Board of Trustees will see a new face at the table, as Fiona Gower takes over from Liz Evans as the representative for Rural Women New Zealand.

NZ Landcare Trust CEO Dr Nick Edgar said, “On behalf of Trust staff I’d like to welcome Fiona to the Board of Trustees. Fiona’s extensive knowledge of rural issues and her understanding of community involvement will be a real asset.”

Fiona is looking forward to the new role. “With the growing importance, emphasis and pressure on freshwater in New Zealand, organisations such as NZ Landcare Trust will play an increasingly important role in achieving positive outcomes for our land and water resources, and I am looking forward to being a part of that journey,” Fiona added. . .

 


Rural round-up

January 8, 2015

Farmer furious cows shot with arrows :

A Kaiaua farmer is calling for more to be done to protect animals in rural environments after three of his cattle were shot with a bow and arrow.

David Olsen, who farms a 600 hectare block at the southern end of the Hunua Ranges, southeast of Auckland,  has been on high alert after his wife spotted an injured cow when taking their dog for a walk on Sunday morning.

On initial inspection, Olsen could not see what was bothering the wounded beast but when he returned later in the afternoon, he realised the seriousness of the situation.

“I saw an animal with three arrows in it and one with one,” he said.

“I looked for the other one I saw in the morning and it was dead so I immediately came back and called the vet and the police.” . . .

Back into the swing – Jenna Cairney:

WHEN Emily Bowman runs her five-kilometre route on the family farm near Barraba, sometimes she feels so energetic, she’ll jump the gate and laugh.

She laughs because she’ll remember when she’d put on her runners and exercise gear in the morning and refuse to take it off until she worked out.

She remembers when her baby boy Oliver would go for a sleep, she’d put her two little girls on a picnic blanket with some morning tea and toys.

She would listen to the baby monitor, then sprint up the hill at “Tarpoly”, sprint back down, check the girls and the monitor again, and repeat. . .

Rural women’s champion honoured  – Anna Williams:

A Marlborough woman who moved to Blenheim when she was 17 for a job at the Marlborough Express has been made an Officer of the New Zealand Order of Merit.

Liz Evans has been recognised for services to rural women in the New Year Honours List.

She is one of two Marlborough honours recipients this year, joining fellow Marlburian Ted Collins, of Spring Creek, who received a Queen’s Service Medal.

Evans, who is a national life member of Rural Women New Zealand, was the national president of the organisation from May 2011 to November 2013. . .

Rural Women congratulates Liz Evans ONZM on her Queen’s New Year’s Honour:

Rural Women New Zealand members are thrilled that Liz Evans, our former national president and a national life member, has been recognised for her services to rural women in the Queen’s New Year’s Honours list, having been made an Officer of the New Zealand Order of Merit (ONZM).

Liz Evans served as Rural Women® national president from 2011 to 2013, and was Marlborough provincial secretary for 10 years. She was also the administrator for the Marlborough Provincial Federated Farmers from 2003 to 2011.

Mrs Evans says she sees the award as both a personal recognition, and recognition of Rural Women New Zealand as an organisation. . . .

Swimming cow saves farmer’s life:

The area north of Wellington was affected badly when floods hit the country in 2004.

A burst of cold air blowing in from the Antarctic ice shelf combined with moist air from a weak tropical low in the north, producing wind and rain on a scale seen only about once every 10 years, with wind speeds peaking at 104kmh.

Hundreds of North Islanders were forced to evacuate their homes, and insurers estimated the cost of damage at $40 million.

Kim Riley was out early in the morning on her dairy farm in Woodville, trying to head off half her herd, which were moving in the direction of the floodwaters, when she was swept away by the current herself. . . .

What the Heck? Killer cows culled – Victoria Ward,

A UK FARMER has been forced to cut down Britain’s only herd of ­Nazi-engineered cows because they were too aggressive and tried to kill his staff.

Derek Gow imported more than a dozen Heck super cows to his west Devon farm in 2009. It was the first time the creatures had set foot on British soil since the Bronze Age.

But the farmer has now been forced to destroy seven of the cows due to their ­ferocious nature. The meat was turned into sausages which Mr Gow said were “very tasty” and a bit like venison. . .

 

Nominations in for Silver Fern Farms’ Director Elections:

Three nominations have been received for the two available positions on the Silver Fern Farms’ Board of Directors.

Rob Hewett and Herstall Ulrich retire by rotation at the Company’s 2014 Annual Meeting which is to be held in Dunedin on Wednesday 18 February 2015. Rob Hewett and Herstall Ulrich have advised they will stand for re-election.
The candidates for election are:

– Fiona Hancox
– Rob Hewett
– Herstall Ulrich . .

* * * * * * * * * * * *

"In 2015, I hope the world will finally begin to understand that the environment and family farmers are not obstacles to sustainable growth, but preconditions for it." - Danielle Nierenberg in Edible Manhattan


RWNZ new president

November 26, 2013

Wendy McGowan has been elected as the new national president of Rural Women New Zealand.

She succeeds Liz Evans who has held the position since 2010.

Wendy McGowan previously served a three-year term as national vice president, and has been the national councillor for Bay of Plenty/Coromandel for the last eight years, taking a special interest in land use issues, bio-security and food safety.

Wendy said, “As national president I will build on our organisation’s goals and aspirations to be dynamic, vibrant, leading, innovative and visible at all levels.

“Rural Women NZ’s interest in land, health, education and community issues need our attention and advocacy, just as they did in the 1920s.  As then, encouraging women living in rural communities to voice their concerns and support for one another is what we do well.”

Wendy announced the appointment of Kerry Maw, the Rural Women national councillor for Canterbury, as her vice president.

Looking ahead, Wendy says it is exciting to be taking a leading role in plans to celebrate the UN International Year of Family Farming in 2014.  The organisation is planning a series of events in March and April around the country to highlight the important role of family farms in provincial economic prosperity.

“It’s also an opportunity to strengthen links and understanding between rural and urban.”

The AGM was officially opened by Rural Women NZ’s patron, Her Excellency, Lady Janine Mateparae, who said her decision to take on the patron’s role was made easier by the organisation’s commitment to provide a voice for rural women and rural families.  

Prime Minister John Key also spoke at the opening ceremony and answered questions from the floor.

He said there are significant differences between our urban and rural communities and the key question is how we make sure those differences and issues are understood by everybody.  He cited broadband access, the volatility of weather that farmers must cope with and schooling in rural areas as key challenges.

Wendy McGowan and her husband Rusty farm a 260 hectare dairy support unit in Kaharoa in the Bay of Plenty.  She is also an enrolled nurse and works as a casual play specialist at Rotorua Hospital’s Children’s Unit.


5 day rural post 3 day urban

October 23, 2013

The Updated Deed of Understanding between the government and New Zealand Post has agreed to retain rural mail deliveries at five a week but urban deliveries could go down to three a week.

Communications and Information Technology Minister Amy Adams says changes were required to ensure the postal service remains viable.

Under the agreement reached between the Government and New Zealand Post, changes to the Deed will not apply until 30 June, 2015.

“Around the world postal volumes are declining. In New Zealand this is at a rate of about 8 per cent per annum,” Ms Adams says.

“It is clear that if changes are not made to the Deed, then significant and on-going government subsidisation in excess of $30 million per year may be required.

“The decision to update the Deed reflects the need to balance the immediate interests of postal users with the longer term need for greater flexibility for New Zealand Post, given the dramatic reduction in the volume of postal items over the past 11 years.

“From their peak in 2002 mail volumes have dropped considerably, with about 328 million fewer items being posted in 2013 compared to 2002.”

New Zealand Post had sought the flexibility to reduce the frequency of mail delivery for standard delivery letters to a minimum of three days per week nationwide.

However, the Government was concerned about the sustainability of rural delivery services and rural contractors in general through fewer deliver days.

“Through negotiations, I have secured agreement from New Zealand Post that it will limit any introduction of a minimum three-day delivery to only urban areas, maintaining five-day delivery in rural delivery areas.

We currently get mail six days a week unless it’s a long weekend when there’s no delivery on Saturdays and Mondays.

Newspapers will be grateful that five-day deliveries are to be maintained because in most rural areas papers are delivered with the mail. If deliveries reduced to three a week most people wouldn’t bother subscribing.

“It is important to note that three-day delivery is the minimum standard New Zealand Post must meet. This means that New Zealand Post may continue to provide a higher frequency of delivery in some non-rural areas.

“The minimum standards in the Deed only apply to basic or standard postal services. The Deed does not apply to other types of postal products or services such as express mail, courier post, parcel post or premium services such as Fast Post.”

Changes to the Deed will also require New Zealand Post to continue to maintain a retail network of at least 880 points of presence, but permit this to be comprised of self-service kiosks, well as physical postal outlets.

Of the 880 points of presence, New Zealand Post has agreed to maintain at least 240 outlets where customers can receive personal assistance from an employee or agent of New Zealand Post.

“This will give comfort to members of the public who may feel anxious at the prospect of the introduction of self-service kiosks.”

The 880 and 240 figures are unchanged from the current Deed, but the specifics in each case have been modified to meet current requirements.

The timeframe for implementing any changes will be a commercial decision for New Zealand Post, after 30 June, 2015.

Minimum service requirements for New Zealand Post are set out in the Deed of Understanding it signed with the Crown in 1998. The Deed has not been significantly reviewed since it was signed.

Federated Farmers welcomes the announcement.

“This is great news for rural people, as many businesses are still heavily reliant on a five day service,” says Bruce Wills, Federated Farmers National President.

“New Zealand Post and the Government have clearly listened to our members concerns and we are pleased that they have recognised the uniqueness of the rural business model in their Deed of Understanding.

“Whilst technology is changing the way we communicate and eventually we will see a decline in postal deliveries, we are not there yet. There are still some 86,000 rural people off-line, where rural post is a daily fixture in the running of their business and household.

“We would like to thank all parties involved for highlighting the unique situation that rural New Zealand is in when it comes to postal delivery,” concluded Mr Wills.

Rural Women NZ is also pleased:

“In our submission, which Minister Amy Adams has acknowledged, we highlighted that the rural delivery is so much more than just a mail service and anything that threatened its sustainability would have widespread unintended consequences,” says Rural Women national president, Liz Evans.

“It is a wraparound distribution service that is part of the fabric that holds rural communities together.

“Our rural delivery contractors provide a lifeline, delivering supplies, repairs and spare parts, animal health remedies, medicines, and courier parcels.

People pay for these services but it would be more expensive and less regular if the rural delivery contractors weren’t able to provide them five days a week.

“The five day service ensures people are able to run their farming enterprises and other rural businesses effectively, even from remote locations.”

Rural delivery contractors also pick up mail and parcels, meaning that it’s feasible to run a production-based business from a rural location. These businesses breathe life into rural communities, as we have seen through our Enterprising Rural Women Awards. Rural Women NZ’s plea to preserve the existing rural delivery service was also based on the limitations of other communications facilities, that urban people take for granted.

“In many rural areas there is limited or no cellphone coverage and we are still dealing with dial-up broadband connections in many cases.”

The mail service is used a lot less than it used to be and the decline is likely to continue.

That decline will be hastened by NZ Post’s reduction in service.
Mail is much slower than it used to be and people are using alternatives because of that.
We used to get killing sheets in the mail but now we can’t rely on timely deliveries we’re getting them emailed.
There will always be some things that can’t be delivered electronically but as technology improves the need for mail services will drop.

Rural round-up

October 22, 2013

SFO confirms preliminary Zespri investigation:

 (BusinessDesk) – The Serious Fraud Office has confirmed it’s looking at legislated export marketing monopolist Zespri International, though is being tight-lipped on any further details.

The white-collar crime investigator has opened a preliminary investigation, but won’t say what it’s looking at or indicating what powers the SFO has to compel Zespri to release information.

“Zespri has not been contacted by the Serious Fraud Office and has no details of the scope or substance of an investigation,” it said in an emailed statement. “Zespri will cooperate with any investigation the Serious Fraud Office may undertake.”

Kiwi Kids Lap Up Fonterra Milk for Schools:

The numbers are in – more than 1000 schools around New Zealand are now enjoying the taste of dairy every school day thanks to Fonterra’s Milk for Schools.

From Southland to Northland, the programme has moved full steam ahead rolling out in eleven regions and reached Auckland today.

Fonterra Chief Executive Officer, Theo Spierings, said over the past five months there has been significant community support for the national rollout.

“Milk is one of the most nutritious foods there is and we want to do what we can to make sure Kiwi kids grow up drinking it every day,” said Mr Spierings. . .

Fonterra investigated over creating lake of buttermilk

The Waikato Regional Council is looking into the dumping of a milk by-product near Taupo by dairy giant Fonterra.

An unknown quantity of buttermilk has been disposed into a lake for storage at an Atiamuri farm, as the dairy giant struggles to keep up with record milk production.

Waikato Regional Council spokesman Rob Dragten says the council is looking into issues around authorisation, but says there’s no immediate threat to the environment. . .

New kids on the block take out Rural Women NZ Journalism Award:

The joint winners of this year’s Rural Women NZ Journalism award are Sarah Perriam and Tony Glynn of Rural Media.

The Rural Women award was one of twelve awards for rural journalism and photography presented at the Guild of Agricultural Journalists’ annual dinner in Wellington on Friday evening.

“Our award sets out to encourage journalism that recognises the important contribution women make either to the farming sector or to rural communities,” says Rural Women NZ national president, Liz Evans. “We congratulate Sarah and Tony, who are offering a fresh approach to producing and sharing stories about rural life, through video as well as broadcast TV.”

Sarah Perriam works on the production side, while Tony Glynn directs, acts and presents programmes for Rural Media, under its Rural TV banner. Their aim is to make rural folk ‘way more famous’. . .

Farmax offers farmers the power of bespoke pasture growth forecasts:

Farmax is the first company to offer sheep, beef and dairy farmers the ability to harness the power of the industry’s newly launched Pasture Growth Forecaster database at a more detailed level.

Farmax has launched a service called My Forecast where farmers provide the address of their property to get customised short-, medium- and long-term pasture growth forecasts specific to their own farming operation.

Farmax General Manager, Gavin McEwen said “To maximise pasture usage, farmers not only require accurate measures of current pasture cover, they also need accurate forecasts. Farmax’s My Forecast service is a powerful tool for assisting with feed planning and budgeting decisions.” . . .

 Farming for the Future….NZ is not supporting Innovation by Leading Farmers – Pasture to Profit:

 Craige & Roz MacKenzie, are the Canterbury Farm Environment Award winners 2013. Very deserving winners….Congratulations.
The MacKenzie family (including daughter Jemma) are one of the most innovative, creative, Push-The-Boundaries, Farm & Research businesses I’ve ever seen. 
 
GreenvalePastures Ltd Facebook page
Andy MacFarlane (MacFarlane Rural Business) last week chaired a very successful Ballance Farm Environment Award fieldday at Greenvale Pastures farm near Methven in Canterbury, New Zealand.
 Ballance Farm Environment Awards. The Regional Winners . . .
Rotorua to host International Forest Safety Summit on 26 & 27th November:

The past 12 months has seen forestry in the media spotlight to two main reasons – both good and bad. Since the global financial crisis hit, forest products exports, led by log exports, have proven once again to be counter-cyclical. While other industries have suffered, forest production has soared to record levels. With the record high log out-turn, from both the small and large forests up and down the country, has come a tragic toll in worker deaths. Heightened awareness driven by the Pike River mine disaster has brought a change in public attitudes to workplace risks. Safety improvement is now top-of-mind for everyone in the forest industry. While serious harm accident numbers and deaths remain much higher in farming than forestry, it is the public perception of workplace risk, underpinned by an well-funded union media campaign of self-interest, that has changed a lot of attitudes towards people working in the bush.

These combined issues have resulted in a focus by the key players in the New Zealand forest industry to drive an in-depth review of forest workplace safety. . .

Leisure and adventure tourism growth spurs backpacker lodge sale:

Capitalising on the growth of tourists’ passion for eco’ tourism, the Tailor-Made-Tekapo Backpackers is on the market for sale

The opening of two major new tourist attractions and the growing popularity of deep space star-gazing are being seen by a long-time South Island tourism operator as the ideal catalyst to retire from the business.

The Alps 2 Ocean Cycle Trail which opened earlier this year in the Central South Island; the Tekapo Springs thermal resort, ice skating rink and snow park which opened in 2012; and Earth and Sky tours at Mt John Observatory, are jointly forecast to substantially increase visitor numbers to the Central South Island region.

The cycle trail is a 300 kilometre four-six day ride from Aoraki Mount Cook to Oamaru via the townships of Twizel, Omarama, Kurow and Lake Pukaki. . .


Rural round-up

October 10, 2013

TPP a matter of when not if says farming leader:

Having returned from the World Trade Organisation (WTO), Federated Farmers believes the logic for the Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP) is so strong and its advantages so apparent, that the absence of President Obama from negotiations will not unduly dent its progress.

“The talk at the WTO in Geneva was when the TPP will happen and not if,” says Bruce Wills, Federated Farmers President, who attended the WTO’s 2013 Public Forum where he co-presented the World Farmers Organisation’s new trade policy.

“Naturally, there was much talk about the United States Government shutdown and what that may mean if a default does take place in just nine-day’s time.

“I sense the Obama Administration is frustrated that domestic political brinkmanship means the President had to stay in Washington. The focus of his administration is building the U.S. economy by exports and that’s the focus of both Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation and TPP negotiations. I must say that U.S. Secretary of State, John Kerry, is a handy substitute. . .

Special agricultural trade envoy hails TPP progress:

New Zealand’s special agricultural trade envoy is hailing what he sees as the progress made at the latest Trans Pacific Partnership trade talks in Bali.

But Mike Petersen agrees with the prime minister that the target of getting an agreement by the the end of the year is still going to be hard work.

John Key chaired Tuesday’s TPP meeting in the absence of the American president, says there’s plenty of political momentum among the 12 countries to get a deal.

The Agricultural Trade envoy, Hawke’s Bay farmer Mike Petersen, says getting trade reforms for agriculture was always going to be challenging, because it will take a political will in countries where there are still high levels of subsidy and tariff protection. . .

First registration of a sustainable agrichemical for the SFF minor crops project:

A new sustainable agrichemical that controls the leafroller pest on New Zealand’s blueberry crops is the first of many registered products to be released as part of the Government lead Sustainable Farming Fund.

The Minor Crops project team coordinated by Horticulture NZ announced the recent release of the insecticide ‘Prodigy™’ Trademark of the Dow Chemical Company (Dow) or an affiliated company of Dow for use on blueberries.

This is the first product to be registered as a result of the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) Sustainable Farming Fund (SFF) project ‘Registration of sustainable agrichemicals for minor crops’. . .

Mental health courses for rural professionals:

The Nelson and Marlborough Public Health Service, in association with Federated Farmers, Like Minds and Rural Support Trust are hosting a seminar to help participants recognise the signs of depression.

“We are targeting rural professionals that work with farmers, so they are able to identify if a farmer is stressed, anxious, angry or sad, which are all sign signs of depression. This way they will be better placed to know how to help the farmer in question,” says Gavin O’Donnell, Federated Farmers Nelson provincial president.

“Rural professionals such as rural bankers, vets, contractors and so on are far more likely to be in a position to identify if there is a problem because they encounter farmers more frequently and in their natural environment. . .

Rural Women NZ Leads on International Year of Family Farming 2014:

Rural Women New Zealand is excited to play a key role in organising a programme of events to celebrate the UN International Year of Family Farming in 2014.

As a member of the steering committee that will liaise directly with the UN, Rural Women NZ has hosted the first meeting in Wellington to start the planning process.

Convened by Organic Systems and Adams Harman, others taking part in the meeting included DairyNZ, Horticulture New Zealand, the New Zealand Farm Forestry Association, Young Farmers, Beef+Lamb NZ, Federated Farmers and Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade.

“Family farming has been the backbone of New Zealand’s rural economy for more than a century, and Rural Women New Zealand has led advocacy and growth for farming families and rural communities since 1925,” says Rural Women NZ’s national president, Liz Evans. . .

NZB Caulfield Championship Finale:

The New Zealand Bloodstock Spring WFA Championship at Caulfield is set to conclude this weekend with the running of the Group 1 A$400,000 Cathay Pacific Caulfield Stakes over 2000m.

With (It’s a) Dundeel (NZ) now out of contention, the Championship winner is a forgone conclusion with Atlantic Jewel (Fastnet Rock) holding an unassailable lead having won Race 2 in the Championship Series – the New Zealand Bloodstock Memsie Stakes – and placing second in the Group 1 Underwood.

The champion mare may have scared many away with Saturday’s feature race only attracting a small field of six runners, but it carries plenty of quality with the field winning a total of eight Group 1 races between them. . .


Diane Coleman – Enterprising Rural Women award winner

May 25, 2013

The Supreme Winner of the RWNZ Enterprising Rural Women Award 2013 is Diane Coleman of Treeline Native Nursery, based at Ngongotaha, near Rotorua.

She also won the Love of the Land category.

Treeline Native Nursery, which Diane started 17 years ago, grows and supplies NZ native trees, shrubs and grasses for revegetation and ornamental purposes, growing 300,000 plants a year that are sold to councils, farmers, landscapers, developers and the home gardener.

Rural Women NZ national president, Liz Evans, said Diane Coleman was chosen as the Supreme Winner out of a strong field of contenders, saying she displayed “skill, calm confidence in the progress of her business and a clear awareness of her market.”

“When demand for products slowed with the 2010 economic downturn, Diane adapted to conditions, made some innovative decisions and was able to maintain production levels.

“Added to this, the business is rural-based, employs several rural women and gives back to the community with fund-raising support.”

Other winners on the night were Jan Harper, of Bluespur Butchery in Lawrence, who won the Telecom-sponsored Help! I Need Somebody category.

As one of New Zealand’s first female butchers, Jan, who’s been in the industry since 1977, said it was a ‘dream come true’ when she opened her own business, Bluespur Butchery, in 2009. As well as selling meat to the public, a big part of the business is processing for farmers and hunters.

A very successful exporter of animal by-products from Waipukurau took away the Making it in Rural category, sponsored by Fly Buys Ltd. Angela Payne runs Agri-lab Co-Products Ltd (www.agri-lab.com). Utilising animal parts that previously may have ended up in the offal-pit, the company specialises in placenta, glands, membranes, tendons and glandulars, with 90 percent of the product exported. This is shipped all over the world as raw products for the pharmaceutical and dietary supplements markets.

Kylie Stewart of Rangitikei Farmstay was announced as the winner of the Stay, Play, Rural Award, sponsored by Access Homehealth Ltd. Her 1500 acre farm has been in the family since 1901 and Kylie has breathed new life into many of the old buildings to create attractive accommodation for up to 19 guests at a time who come from all over the world to get a taste of New Zealand rural life with farm tours, horse treks, clay bird shooting and shearing and mustering demonstrations on offer. (www.rangitikeifarmstay.co.nz).

The judging panel also decided this year to give a special Rural Women NZ Encourgement Award. This went to Lee Lamb, a young farming woman who lives in Waikaia, Southland.

As her children grew, and unable to find New Zealand farm-themed books to read to them, Lee decided to write and illustrate her own. A self-taught writer and painter, Lee was also determined to have her books printed in New Zealand. She now has four titles: On the Farm Shearing, On the Farm Autumn Muster, On the Farm Milking Time and On the Farm Harvest.

In congratulating all the winners, Liz Evans said, “Running a successful business anywhere in today’s competitive economy is not easy. It takes time, commitment, money and a passion to succeed. And, of course, you have to have the initial idea to get started.

“And, in the rural context, the start-up and ability to keep going can produce even more challenges. The logistics of running a business away from a centralised urban area can throw up hurdles such as access to prompt transport and communication – not to mention extra costs of freight and postage. All our winners have jumped those hurdles.” . . .

This is the fifth year RWNZ has run the awards.

They are a wonderful way to showcase rural businesswomen and the variety of enterprises in which they’re involved.


Rural round-up

March 28, 2013

Strong contenders for Enterprising Rural Women Award 2013:

Twenty exciting and innovative businesses are in the line up for the Rural Women New Zealand Enterprising Rural Women Awards 2013.

The judges now face the challenging task of choosing finalists in the four entry categories: Love of the Land (sponsored by Agrisea Limited), Help I Need Somebody (sponsored by Telecom), Making it in Rural (sponsored by Fly Buys) and Stay, Play, Rural (sponsored by Access Homehealth Ltd).

These four category winners will go on to compete for the title of Supreme winner, Enterprising Rural Women Award 2013.

“This is the fifth year we’ve run the Enterprising Rural Women Awards,” says RWNZ National President, Liz Evans. “Each year it’s rewarding to see the diversity of businesses successfully run by women in rural areas and the significant inputs they make into the wider economy.

“Through these awards Rural Women NZ aims to celebrate their success and raise awareness of women’s entrepreneurship, which helps to grow dynamic rural communities.” . . .

Alliance boss is buoyant on prospects – Alan Williams:

Price falls have helped increase demand for lamb in world markets and this will help New Zealand processors avoid the big build-up in stocks that hurt them last year, Alliance Group chief executive Grant Cuff says.

The country’s biggest lamb exporter has cleared the high inventory levels from last year and is managing to move this season’s kill through the market despite higher processing tallies caused by the severe drought conditions. . .

 

 

Opportunity missed on goat meat exports – Rob Tipa:

ONE of the world’s leading judges of the South African Boer goat breed believes New Zealand has missed an opportunity to capitalise on huge worldwide demand for goat meat.

Celia Burnett-Smith, stud director of Australian Breeding Services and a partner in the Terraweena Boer Stud in Queensland, has judged Boer goats at livestock shows in South Africa, Brazil, Australia and New Zealand and has been invited to set up a classification system for the breed in England. . .

 

Managing our freshwater responses in a changing climate – Waiology:

While water management is challenging enough as it is, climate change makes it harder. No longer can we rely solely on experiences from the past to guide our actions, but we must also consider forecasts of the future. And with New Zealand’s water resources expected to change in the coming decades – well within resource management planning horizons – it would be prudent to start to adapt sooner than later. So how does climate change affect the ways water may be governed, and how are current governance systems placed to deal with climate change?  . . .

Celebrity Cook Takes Up The Fight For Kiwi Bees:

New Zealand’s famous Free Range Cook, Annabel Langbein, has become an ‘ambassador’ for New Zealand bees.

The cookbook author and television presenter has joined forces with the National Beekeepers Association to work on projects that help promote and protect our kiwi bees. She will work officially with the NBA to help spread the message that bees are vitally important and that they need our help to survive.

“My father kept bees as a hobby, so I grew up watching him tend the hives in our Wellington backyard. And as a free range cook who uses nature as my pantry I thoroughly appreciate the importance of bees and the hugely critical role they play in our everyday lives – not to mention the value they add to our economy through pollination.” . . .

And from Smile Project:


Benedict Collins wins Rongo

October 15, 2012

The TBfree New Zealand Rongo Award, the supreme prize at the New Zealand Guild of Agricultural Journalists and Communicators  awards has been won by  Benedict Collins for programmes prepared for Country99TV.

The runner up was Shawn McAvinue  for articles which appeared in the Southland Times. He now works for the Otago Daily Times.

The Rural Women NZ Journalism Award was won by Jackie Harrigan for articles that appeared in Country-Wide magazine. Andrew Stewart of Young Country, another NZX Agri group publication was runner up.

The award recognises journalism that portrays the important contribution women make to farm businesses and in rural communities.

In presenting the award, Rural Women NZ national president, Liz Evans, said the winning entries were refreshing, informative and topical and reflected the true professionalism of the farming women whose stories they told.
One story, for example, involved school leaver Anita, who finally got her dream job as a shepherd on a North Island hill country station, only to experience a quad bike accident that left her in a wheelchair. But Anita’s fighting spirit has ensured that she is still pursuing a career in agriculture. . . 
Liz Evans said, “Rural Women New Zealand continues to support these awards as we see the calibre and content of the entries about rural women, their lives, businesses and communities grow more dynamic each time.”
Other awards went to:
AGMARDT Agribusiness Award –  Hugh Stringleman
AgResearch Science Writers Award – Tim Cronshaw, The Press;  runner up Peter Burke, Rural News
Beef + Lamb NZ News Award – Richard Rennie
Ballance Agri-Nutrients –  Tim Cronshaw, The Press;  runner up, Ali Tocker, Waikato Times
Guild Encouragement Award  –  John  Watson, Country99TV
Federated Farmers Rural Photograph Award   –  Jonathan Cameron, Taranaki Daily News
Horticulture New Zealand Journalism Award -Tim Fulton, NZ Farmers Weekly;  runner up, Susan Murray, Country Life
PGG Wrightson Sustainable Land Management Award –  Susan Murray, Country Life.

Rural round-up

September 1, 2012

NZ beef carbon footprint study highlights productivity gains

The New Zealand beef industry has completed a study1 examining the full carbon footprint of New Zealand beef, and it highlights significant productivity gains.

Beef + Lamb New Zealand General Manager Market Access, Ben O’Brien says the study was driven by the industry’s sustainability focus and the dual challenges posed by an increasing global population and pressure on the planet’s limited resources.

“We see this study as making a valuable contribution to the global livestock production story and we will be contributing the results of this study to the FAO work programme on environmental performance of livestock food chains.” . . .

A tale of two countries on pest control – Bruce Wills:

Sometimes we Kiwis don’t appreciate how good we’ve got it.

That truth was rammed home to me in a discussion I had with a visiting British academic, Dr Gareth Enticott.

Dr Enticott is looking into lessons that could be taken back to Britain to deal with their Bovine Tuberculosis (TB) problem.

He was also on the West Coast earlier in the week to meet with one of our board members, Katie Milne. . .

Merino mitts a hot seller – Rebecca Ryan:

Tucked away just off Oamaru’s main street is Kate Watts’ boutique studio – the home of her popular range of fine merino fingerless gloves.

 From Auckland to Invercargill, Miss Watts has about 100 stockists of her hand-printed range, but she is thrilled with the way they have taken off in Oamaru.

“The small towns are definitely the biggest part of my business. There’s a surprising number of small towns across the country and that seems to be where we make most of the money,” she said. . .

Ram testing has lifted quality of lamb flock – Jacquie Webby:

In the 10 years since it was introduced, Central Progeny testing has become a recognised tool for New Zealand sheep farmers.

Launched in June 2002, the Central Progeny Test (CPT) helps farmers identify rams that are superior for traits which add value to sheep farming operations.

The tests compare rams by running their progeny in identical environments, allowing a comparison not by environmental conditions but by genetics. . .

Sowing seeds of new hobby – Jacquie webby:

Rural schoolchildren are being encouraged to experience the magic of growing vegetables and fruit trees – helped along by hopefully securing one of two grants from Rural Women New Zealand.

The organisation has joined forces with Meridian, which is funding two $2000 cash grants for schools to buy equipment, seedlings or plants.

National president Liz Evans said knowing how to grow fruit and vegetables was a basic skill that would stand children in good stead during their lives. . . .

Progressive global beef and lamb developments:

While a PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) report for New Zealand Trade & Enterprise (NZTE) points towards growing New Zealand agribusiness globally, Craig Hickson, of Hawke’s Bay based Progressive Meats, proves there is opportunity left in our traditional markets.

“While we must maximise the potential of New Zealand’s land resource, there is an inescapable logic about taking our intellectual property and skills globally,” says Jeanette Maxwell, Federated Farmers Meat & Fibre chairperson.

“If we take a leaf from the automotive industry, Toyota now makes most of its vehicles outside Japan. . .

Dairy NZ is calling for applciations for its On-Farm Innovation Fund:

The On-Farm Innovation Fund helps turn great ideas into better on farm  practice. It is aimed specifically at farmers, people who work with farmers and  smaller organisations that would not normally have ready access to innovation  and research funding.

Projects that are funded will demonstrate their success by showing on farm  improvements that can be readily and easily taken up by New Zealand dairy  farmers. . .


Entries called for Rural Women New Zealand Journalism Award

August 8, 2012

Rural Women New Zealand is calling for entries for its Journalism Award 2012, which will be presented at the NZ Guild of Agricultural Journalists Awards in Wellington on 12 October.

Rural Women NZ began sponsoring the prize five years ago to encourage journalists to redress a serious gender imbalance in the rural media, and turn their attention to the achievements of women living and working in rural communities.

It’s a strategy that’s paid off, says RWNZ national president, Liz Evans.

“At last year’s awards, there were more entries in the Rural Women New Zealand Journalism Award category than any other, reflecting much more balanced reporting in the rural media.”

There’s also been a growth in the number of women working as rural reporters. . .

Entries in the RWNZ Journalism Award 2012 must be of two articles, radio broadcasts or television programmes based on the theme of ‘rural women making a difference’.

“This could be in the sense of community involvement, on farm, or in another rural-based business or activity.”

Entries close Monday 10 September 2012.  Any New Zealand-based journalist or communicator is eligible to enter the award. The winner will receive $500.

Clicking on the link above will take you to a link to entry forms.


Postie pat on back awards launched

August 7, 2012

Rural Women New Zealand is launching a Postman pat-on-the-back Award to celebrate the great service rural posties deliver.

“There are some heart-warming stories out there about posties who go above and beyond to make sure the mail gets through,” says RWNZ national president, Liz Evans.

“We’ve heard of posties who find the right home for mail addressed only with first names, who telephone first before delivering large parcels or who leave sweet treats in letterboxes.”

And in a crisis the rural delivery contractors can be a lifeline.  During floods, when bridges have been washed away, rural posties have been known to deliver supplies by boat to people whose road access is cut off.

Entries should be emailed to  enquiries@ruralwomen.org.nz, The 10 best will be  published on Rural Women’s Facebook page, the winner will get a prize package and the winning postie will get a gift too.

North Otago is the only place in the country which denotes rural mail runs with a letter. Where anywhere else your address might be 2 R.D. Heriot or 5 R.D. Te Anau, here it will be a number then C,D, H, K or O before the R.D., for example 3 C R.D. or 5 K R.D. The letter is more important than the number but is often missed out so our posties are called on to make educated guesses about where mail is supposed to go and they rarely get it wrong.

We haven’t had to ask our current rural mail contractor to go the extra mile for us, though we’re very happy with the service we get.

But the one we had about 20 years ago was very good at deciphering cryptic of vague addresses. He once delivered a postcard to us that had our first names only with the address a farm near Windsor.


16 finalists in Enterprising Rural Women awards

April 5, 2012

Sixteen finalists have been selected for Rural Women NZ’s  Enterprising Rural Women Awards:

The judges now face the challenging task of choosing the North and South Island and Online Business category finalists.  These three category winners will go on to compete for the title of Supreme winner, Enterprising Rural Women Award 2012.

 “This is the fourth year we’ve run the Enterprising Rural Women Award, and it’s encouraging to see the diversity of businesses being run by women in rural areas,” says RWNZ National President, Liz Evans. 

“Celebrating their success and raising awareness of women’s entrepreneurship is an important way in which we can help grow dynamic communities.”

Entries in this year’s Telecom North Island category include an alpaca farmer, a bra designer and manufacturer, an importer/retailer, an export-focused food and beverage consultant, a writer, a soil specialist and an educator on biological farming.

The variety of entrants in the new Online Business Award category, sponsored by Fly Buys, illustrates the opportunities that the internet offers and the way it is levelling the playing field when it comes to doing business in a rural location.  The entrants include an online store focused on motherhood resources and products, a writer and author, a natural skincare manufacturer and a dog equipment company.

 The South Island category, sponsored by Access Homehealth Ltd, attracted the most entries this year, with businesses ranging from an eco-based tourist park, to a designer clothing manufacturer and retailer, a tourism publisher, a livestock brokering software and support company, a travel broker and a beauty and day spa.

The finalists are:

NORTH ISLAND AWARD
Kim Fagan, Cluster of small businesses, Te Kuiti
www.3gteak.co.nz; www.bb-nz.com; www.smarty-pants.co.nz; www.buykiwimade.co.nz.

Kim Fagan began her retailing hub company in 2003 in a vibrant cluster of buildings in Te Kuiti.  3G Teak stands for three girls, three generations, three girls.  Kim, her mother and her daughter.  The retail outlets 3G Teak selling handcrafted gifts and homeware; Cantik Living – designs for the home; BB NZ (corporate and promotional marketing); Elements (outdoor pots, waterfeatures and landscape products); Smarty Pants (creative and educational play for kids); BuyKiwiMade.  Kim has won many awards for business and in 2010 3G Teak was officially named the Top Giftware and Homewares Shop in the Waikato by the NZ Retailers’ Association and in 2011 was one of three finalists in the 2011 Waikato Business Excellence Awards Leader of the Year.  Kim undertakes the marketing and operational requirements of each business.

Kim uses interesting marketing strategies.  All stores have an in store web kiosk available for customers browsing to promote products offered online.  3G Teak now trades nationwide and internationally.  In order to meet compliance 3G Teak has its own devanning facility so imported containers can be unloaded onsite.  Kim has a MAF Facility Operators Licence and MAF Accredited Persons Licence.

Through her business Kim contributes to the wider rural community attracting people to come and shop in Te Kuiti and providing employment for nine families in the community.

Kylie Gibbard, Emkay Limited Levin,  www.emkaygirl.com

Emkay Ltd designs, manufactures and wholesales the Emkay Bra.  Its unique design was launched onto the NZ market in November 2010.  The bra evolved from Kylie’s need to find a bra that provided comfort and support and that she could wear all day out on the farm.  It was originally designed for the 14DD+ market and took five years of design and component testing before it was released.  It’s now available in 8B to 40HH.  Production is based on the farm at Koputaroa, 10 minutes north of Levin and are proud of their Kiwi-designed and made product, made with highest quality components and a local labour force which now includes 4 full time and 2 part time factory staff, 1 NZ sales rep, 1 admin and customer services manager as well as Kylie and her partner Darrell Stratton.  Kylie has a sales focus and Darrell focuses on the running of the factory and business.

The company now has 35 NZ stockists and has broken into the Australian market.

Emkay is a truly rural based company with its design at the heart of rural living.  With a number 8 wire and can do attitude, Kylie and Darrell’s unique Emkay Bra is set to revolutionise the bra industry.

Leonie Walker, Nevalea Alpacas, Taumarunui, www.nevaleaalpacas.co.nz.

Leonie began her business in 2007 with the purchase of two female alpacas with cria at foot.  Now she has a herd of 340 alpacas and she employs six part time hand knitters.  The fibre is used in the garments and products sold in Leonie’s farm shop.  Each animal’s fleece is individually processed, and Leonie designs the garments and felted products.  All garments are hand sewn, and they offer a made to measure service.  Products are also sold via an online shop.

Lucy Cruickshank, Innov8 Aotearoa Ltd – Masterton.

Two years ago Lucy Cruickshank decided it was time to set up her own export-focused food and beverage consultancy with the skills she’d gleaned from 10 years in the international sales and marketing sector of NZ agri business.

The business works with start-ups through to large multi-million dollar operations.  She not only assists client with strategies, but also gives the operator the confidence to follow through with implementation.

Lucy says her point of difference is the business’ focus on rural based food and beverage producers.

She has done consultancy work for a range of businesses, providing innovative marketing and sales strategies and implementation, and analysing global market trends.  She has also established and sold her first brand – Pure Aotearoa – to a large trading company.  She has also set up a national food distribution business – Pure Wairarapa Limited – to complement the food and beverage consultancy work she does.  Lucy won a trip to Japan sponsored by the Japanese Government to further relationships in the agri-business sector with the JENESYS programme, which allowed her to develop exports to Japan for Innov8 and her clients.  She recently won a Grow Wellington scholarship to attend the Activate programme.

Sue Edmonds, The Farming Writer,  Eureka Waikato.

Sue Edmonds is a regular attendee at farming events and conferences and is a keen analyst, interpreting the significant issues arising and then translating them into ‘farmer speak’ for her readers.  She currently writes for Coast & Country, Rural News and Dairy News and contributes heavily to the New Farm Dairies publication which is distributed nationally.  She has spent the last fourteen odd years living on a lifestyle block in Eureka in the Waikato where she cares for a pair of cows, donkeys and goats.

Nicole Masters, Integrity Soils – Waipukurau www.integritysoils.co.nz.

Integrity Soils is a specialist business providing educational services and books to the rural sector throughout NZ and Australia.  In a ‘soils first’ approach the business focuses on putting control back into farmers’ hands in regards to nutrients and soil, crop and animal management.  It aims to support farmer learning to ensure food quality produced is the best in the world.  As biological farming moves into the mainstream, Nicole’s passion that she has pursued for the last 10 years since graduating from Otago, is becoming a reality.  She says “many on farm issues can be solved through improved observation skills and proactive management as opposed to the reactive model currently favoured.”

Nicole started her business to fit around being a single mum in a rural community, starting with a commercial worm farm supplying worm products, compost works and delivering school education programmes.  In 2003-4 she became the youngest chair on the board of Soil & Health in its 70 year history.  She is now an independent agricultural extension agent, working out of Waipukurau in Central Hawke’s Bay.  She organises conferences on biological farming, runs workshops here and in Australia, and promotes eco-agriculture through writing articles in rural papers, establishing farming networks and covering all sectors from dairy, beef, viticulture, horticulture, market gardening etc.

Nicole believes there are many incredible women who have played pivotal roles in shaping agriculture, and she believes now more than ever farming requires this feminine quality, working with nature in a more nurturing and empathetic manner.

ONLINE AWARD

Frances McInnes, Breastmates, Cambridge  www.breastmates.co.nz

Breastmates is an online store that started from humble beginnings in 2004 with $50 start up  and a one page website.  It started as a hobby while Frances was on maternity leave when a bad shopping experience helped identify a gap in the market for a breastfeeding specialty store.  This has now evolved into a trusted maternity brand with quality products and reputation.  The business operates solely through online sales and retails many brands, plus the company’s own designs and branded product range.  The online store focuses on motherhood and supporting mothers with their choices as well as selling products.  It has a large community of 13,000 Facebook followers, and an extensive base of resources (over 2,500 articles).  It also has a child birth educator and lactation consultant available to answer questions and an easy to use website.

The community and article base builds trust and potential customers and Frances believes that if they help people and give their time they will come back and purchase, or refer the store to their friends.  Supporting mothers is the key to the business, rather than selling products, and that is the key to Breastmates’ success.  The company has had steady increasing sales and performance since start up and is currently building international sales.

Rae Roadley – Writer and author – Maungaturoto, www.raeroadley.co.nz.

After moving to the city to a beef and sheep farm in Kaipara, Northland, in 2000, Rae’s work as a writer has evolved to accommodate her rural location, dreams and goals.  She has transitioned from being a full time newspaper journalist to being self-employed.  Initially she wrote for business and freelance articles, but is now also an author, columnist and writing tutor.  Rae currently writes for the Northern Advocate, NZ Concrete Society and Scene magazine. After several years as a columnist she submitted some of her columns to Penguin Books, which led to her publishing a memoir about her life at Batley, the Roadley family’s historic home, and the area’s history.  Love at the End of the Road was published in 2011, fulfilling a long held dream to become an author.  She tutors the Non-Fiction programme at NorthTec, with all the work done online.  In fact 95% of Rae’s work is now done online, and her promotional tools have grown to encompass social media.  Rae and husband Rex will feature in an episode of Country Calendar, filmed in early March.

Stephanie Kimpton – Oasis Beauty NZ Limited – Oxford – www.oasisbeauty.co.nz.

Stephanie says Oasis Beauty is a perfect example of what can happen when a person gets carried away with their hobby.  It happened to her 12 years ago when she discovered a book on how to make your own skincare products.  After producing a range of products with sister in law Donna Evans they began to sell by party plan, “the best product development any company could do”.  With this first hand feedback she researched, consulted suppliers and fine tuned her products.  Now Oasis Beauty offers a natural skincare range, with the point of difference being its specialisation in sensitive skin, sun protection and skin repair.  The company sells through beauty clinics, health stores and pharmacies and online.  All products are manufactured in a Christchurch GM-approved factory and each batch undergoes lab testing before going out into the market.  Ingredients are sourced in NZ as much as possible and the products are ‘cruelty free’. Oasis has grown from kitchen enterprise to factory-made in Christchurch and despite the Canterbury earthquakes and their aftermath has continued to grow its business, now employing two permanent part time staff and  casual labour to assist with preparing product samples and packing orders.  Stephanie works by the rule ‘treat people the way you want to be treated’.

The earthquakes caused Stephanie to review the business and a decision to focus more strongly on online sales to improve cash flow and profitability.  ‘The internet gives Oasis Beauty’ the same platform as every other business to showcase its products, services and points of difference.  It doesn’t matter whether a business is big, small, town or country-based, the internet levels the playing field.

SOUTH ISLAND AND ONLINE AWARD
Lynn Bridson, Bellbird Ranch Ltd, Owaka –
  www.catlinsnz.com

Bellbird Ranch Ltd in which Lynn is a 50% shareholder is a company that operates McLean Falls Holiday Park and Whistling Frog Cafe & Bar in the Catlins.  Having bought and run a sheep farm and planted a forest in the region (over 1 million seedlings) in 1996, Lynn recognised the tourist potential.  In 2001 Lynn purchased a farm that was located at a strategic intersection on the Southern Scenic Route and the iconic Cathedral Caves and McLean Falls intersection.  The run down sheep farm also included 100 ha of native bush, since fenced off.  Coming from a hospitality background, Lynn and her husband’s introduction to sheep and beef farming was a steep learning curve.  When the Southern Scenic Route was tar sealed in 2005 the couple gauged there were sufficient travellers to support a tourism business including a holiday park, motel and chalets and on site cafe and bar.

The extremely remote location presented its own challenges  with no cellphone coverage or broadband.  But despite being ‘the worst place in New Zealand to do business’ Lynn recognised the potential of the scenic wonderland.  They used an eco theme and recycled buildings and cabins, and based the decor on a Kiwiana theme.  They planted 10,000 natives to attract bird life, and a pond to offer habitat to the resident endangered Whistling frogs.  Lynn handles the daily operations for the park which can now offers 60 beds and accommodation for 100 tenters and campervaners.  It is often full. The business has boosted the local economy and employs 7 fulltime workers during the high season.  Tour buses also regularly stop by.

Rose Voice, The Real Dog Equipment Company Limited, Ranfurly; www.realdog.co.nz.

Rose’s passion for dogs has been with her for 30 years.  At that stage she was immersed in sled dog racing with Alaskan Malamute dogs, and imported gear from the US.  Being ‘a fairly sufficient sort of girl’ Rose thought ‘I can make that’.  She purchased an industrial sewing machine and set up costs came partly from the sale of a litter of puppies.  She developed a few articles of gear, and then a website to sell it through.  Her idea was that if she had a website and a courier she could live anywhere.  She sources materials, hardware and fabrics of high quality and guarantees her work.  A musterer came to the Southern Field days with his collar that he’d bought 9 years ago that had out-lived two dogs!

Her business has grown and diversified, including lifting strops for search & rescue dogs, collars for seeing-eye dogs and dog backpacks, life jackets, bungy leads all designed and tested by Rose.  She has expanded into the alpaca industry making halters, ropes and backpacks, as well as award winning Limited Slip dog collars used by the country’s top sheep dog trialists, and bull show halters and horse handling ropes.

Last year her husband retired from Police work to work with Rose and they moved to the Maniototo building a home and purpose built workshop and space for their 14 dogs.

Now they send gear all over the world, and even send sled dog equipment to Alaska!

They use YouTube and Facebook to make and show instruction movies for people struggling with a training issue or use of a piece of equipment.

SOUTH ISLAND AWARD

Christine Wardell, ChritinZ – Balclutha –  www.christinz.co.nz.

Christine started out designing a comfortable pair of pants to wear while recovering from an operation in 2006 and the business grew as she started making pants for friends and family until it became a full time occupation and the ChristinZ label was born.  The range grew to include skirts, jackets, tunics, dresses cardigans, coats and more. Clothes are made to order and many different fabrics are used to provide garments with an individualised look. Now she sells ‘on the road’ at shows and fieldays, as well as ‘pop up shops’ where she bases herself at a different South Island locate for three days at a time.

She also has a website shop and mail order service, meaning location is not  a barrier to supply.

She now employs a part time sewer and some of her clothing manufacture is outsourced.  Despite the range now including over 30 different garments , her original pants are still her Number 1 seller.

 

Amy Lamb, Tourist Times – Waikari, www.holidayhere.co.nz.

Five years ago, Amy Lamb purchased her first business, Tourist Times Canterbury.  After proving doubters wrong about the ability to run a business such as this from Waikari, along with farming and raising children, she has gone on to purchase the Otago/Southland and Nelson/Marlborough/West Coast regions of the monthly tabloid regional newspaper business.  The publications promote local businesses and regional destinations, with each newspaper run under a licence agreement.  Amy’s introduction to the media began at the NZ Broadcasting School where she studied for a Bachelor of Broadcasting Communications.  She is married to a North Canterbury sheep and beef farmer, and she sees her business as being all about communications and providing opportunities to allow businesses, regions, destinations, communities and people she works with to grow.  Building strong partnerships in her business meant that after the Canterbury earthquakes she didn’t miss an edition, and in fact provided the only updated printed information directly intended for visitors.

Jennifer Scott, Livestock Office, Cromwell  www.livestockoffice.com

After many years developing and selling software products relating to farming businesses, Jennifer now focuses on promoting Livestock Office a professional, specialised and comprehensive software package incorporating the latest advances in technology.  The aim is to provide the agricultural sector with innovative, reliable and affordable software.

Jennifer undertakes sales, training and support.  LivestockOffice is the only specialised Livestock Brokering software developed in New Zealand for NZ conditions, but with potential to be used internationally, which is the company’s focus for the immediate future.  It can be tailored to suit any livestock business from a one man band to the corporate level.  Modules available include mass communications, auction transfer, document manager, web sale using hand held devices and eSale using smart phones.  It includes debtors, creditors, cashbook and general ledger, GST calculator, reporting etc. It can handle all types of sales private, grazing, auction etc.

Lynne Sinclair, NZ Travel Broker – Five Forks.

Lynne is a self-employed travel broker living at Five Forks, 20 minutes inland from Oamaru.  Not restricted to the bricks and mortar of a traditional travel agency, she is able to fulfil her clients needs around the clock, from home.  She deals with air travel, accommodation, rental cars, cruising, coach tours, groups and special interest, sightseeing, foreign exchange, insurance, visas passports and more.  She’s been a travel broker for 15 years and is still passionate about travel.  In November 2011 she was placed 1st in QBE Travel Insurance Broker of the Year, and GO Holidays Broker of the Year.  When not travelling, virtually or actually, she helps on the family’s 305 hectare farm.

Sarah Huggins, Inspire Beauty & Day Spa – Waimate.

Sarah’s vision is to create an oasis of peace and tranquillity where you can soothe your mind, relax your body and renew your spirit.  She is the operator of Inspire Beauty and Day Spa in Waimate, where she’s lived most of her life, and lives on a farm.  But she’s no country bumpkin.  She has a strong passion for living on the cutting edge of style and fashion and says her calling is to make people feel good about themselves.  After graduating from beauty training school in Christchurch nine and a half years ago, she worked in Oamaru and Timaru, honing her product knowledge and developing her passion for specialised skincare.  She was however keen to help Waimate to become more self-sufficient in service and retail, with many people shopping and spending outside of the local area.  And so Inspire was born in 2008 and she became her own boss.  She now employs another person, and brings the benefits of the big city experience to the small town Pop. 3000.  She offers facials, skincare consultation, manicures, pedicures, massage, waxing, electrolysis, tanning, make up, weight loss programmes, botox and more.

The winners will be announced at a special ceremony to be held on the opening night of the RWNZ national conference in Hawera on Monday 21 May.


Enterprising Rural Women finalists

May 7, 2011

Rural Women NZ has announced the finalists for its third annual Enterprising Rural Women Awards.

The South Island winner, sponsored by Telecom, is Lisa Harper of Sherrington Grange.

RWNZ says:

 Lisa supplies accommodation, food and educational experiences to a niche market on her farm in the Marlborough Sounds.  Lisa has built on family tradition and the skills she learned as a child, and now produces some of the best cheeses in New Zealand. 

She has developed a wide range of goats’ and cows’ milk cheeses, including full strength European-style cheeses that are not common here.  Deliberately cross-marketing her products and services, Lisa also caters for the growing market of travellers who seek experiences, rather than simply accommodation.  Many visitors come to take one of Lisa’s cheese making classes as part of their Marlborough Sounds’ stay.

The North Island winner is Nestling, a business run by sisters Maria-Fe Rohrlach and Bernadine Guilleux. 

RWNZ says:

Based in Mamaku, Rotorua, Nestling produces organic merino and cotton baby wraps and slings.  The judges were impressed by Nestling’s use of New Zealand materials and their commitment to manufacturing onshore, as well as their innovative designs, where modern fabrics and colours are fused with the traditional methods of wrapping and carrying babies. 

Judges were Liz Evans, Rural Women New Zealand’s National President, Tina Symmans, Telecom’s  director of corporate relations, and John Ayling, chairman of Access Homehealth.

The awards aim to celebrate rural business women and promote their achievements. Among criteria judges consider are: innovation, rural enterprise, points of difference;  product and service quality, meeting compliance requirements, environmental awareness;  marketing and promotion, including evidence that the business is progressing;  financial performance and economic inputs into the rural community; staff management and/or personal development.

The North and South Island winners will attend the Awards ceremony at the RWNZ national conference on Friday 20 May when the overall winner will be announced.


Calling enterprising rural women

November 30, 2010

Rural Women NZ has opened entries for its third annual Enterprising Rural Women award.

“The Award celebrates women who take on the extra challenge of running a business in a rural area and it’s a great opportunity to boost your business profile,” says RWNZ National President Liz Evans.

Past entrants have received extensive media coverage and seen the positive effects on their businesses.

Last year’s Supreme winner, Tineke Verkade, of Homeopathic Farm Support Limited, says winning the 2010 RWNZ Enterprising Rural Women Award has led to three appearances on television, as well as radio shows and numerous newspaper articles throughout the country.

“Winning the Award was really a boost for the staff and for me.” 

She says it has made her more enthusiastic and given her the confidence to come up with strategies to cope with the recession, including new products that are currently being tested by Massey, and writing a book on homeopathy for horses.

Last year’s South Island winner, Tracey Robinson, who runs children’s merino sock company Cosy Toes Ltd from the tiny town of Rotherham in North Canterbury, says her win has had a very positive spin off. 

“I’m definitely busier because of it.”

The RWNZ Enterprising Rural Women Award 2011 is being sponsored by Telecom and Access Homehealth Ltd, who will both be involved in the judging.

Entries close Friday 18 March 2011 and the award ceremony will take place in Auckland in May.,

Further information and entry forms can be found here or by calling (04) 473 5524.


Jon Morgan wins Rural Women ag journalism award

October 21, 2010

Jon Morgan from the Dominion Post has won Rural Women New Zealand’s 2010 award for  journalists who highlight acheivements of rural women.

He was commended for writing stories which shine a spotlight on rural issues for a largely urban readership.

The Runner-up for the award was Liz Brook, who writes for Central Districts Farmer.

“We set up the award with the Guild two years ago to encourage greater balance in rural journalism,” says Rural Women New Zealand National President, Liz Evans. 

 “It is rewarding to see more articles being written about women in rural communities achieving extraordinary things, both in farming and in the general rural environment. 

Morgan’s winning stories were: Sweet smell of lambing success and Unlocking women’s rural skills .

Brooks winning stories were: Beefing up the meat industry and Staying true to the land and to God.

These awards were announced at the Guild of Agricultural Journalist’s annual dinner. Other winners were:

BNZ Partners’ Rongo Award recognising excellence in agricultural journalism: Richard Rennie,  for a portfolio of articles which appeared in NZ Farmers Weekly and NZ Dairy Exporter, focussing on issues around the possible sale of the Crafar farms to overseas interests.

Runner-up: the team from NZX Agri’s Country-Wide monthly newspaper, for a series of 12 articles entitled Prime Movers, largely the work of journalist Sandra Taylor.

 BNZ Partners ‘ Farm Business Writing Award: Sandra Taylor, for two articles in the Prime Mover’s series which appeared in Country-Wide.

 AgResearch Science Writers Award, established to enhance standards of science writing, especially about pastoral agriculture: Jon Morgan.

 Horticulture New Zealand Journalism Award, set up last year to recognise excellence in agricultural journalism focussing on New Zealand’s horticulture industry: Jon Morgan. 

 AGMARDT Agribusiness Award, which recognises high quality information about and effective analysis of national, global and other agribusiness: Herald On Sunday journalist, Maria Slade.

Federated Farmers Rural Photography Award, for a single photo that illustrates a rural event or activity – agricultural, horticultural, industry, human interest, on farm / off farm, or any activity reflecting life or work in rural New Zealand: NZX Agri journalist and photographer, Marie Taylor.

The Guild’s own award, designed to encourage and recognise excellence among journalists with three or fewer years reporting on agricultural issues, The Agricultural Journalism Encouragement Award: Blair Ensor of the Marlborough Express.


MPs getting plastered

October 7, 2010

First it was Young Farmers, now MPs are getting plastered  too.

The Parliamentary ‘Let’s Get Plastered for Breast Cancer event is part of a nationwide campaign by Rural Women New Zealand (RWNZ) to remind women of the importance of staying in touch with their breast health.

Thirty MPs and staff are taking part, making plaster casts of their busts, which will be revealed at an anonymous exhibition of breast sculptures to be held at Parliament next Tuesday, 12 October.

“We are delighted that MPs and parliamentary staff are supporting this event.  It’s a fun way to highlight the need for women to monitor their breast health and stay alert to any changes,” says RWNZ National President, Liz Evans. 

“Breast screening is the best tool for diagnosing breast cancer, but for women outside the 45-69 year age range covered by the national screening programme, self-awareness is vital.”

Next week’s event at the Beehive is being hosted by National list MP Dr Jackie Blue, who was also New Zealand’s first breast physician.  She maintains a keen interest in breast cancer awareness.

Rural Women is selling plaster kits for $10 with the profits donated the the NZ Breast Cancer Foundation. More than 20 breast sculpture events have been organised around the country.


Young Farmers getting plastered

September 29, 2010

Young Farmers are getting plastered for a good cause.

They’re fronting up to support A Rural Women New Zealand’s initiative to highlight the need for women of all ages to be alert to any changes in their breasts.

 Let’s Get Plastered for Breast Cancer  is a nationwide event involves women, and some men, creating plaster sculptures of their torsos, which are going on display in galleries and cafes all over the country for Breast Cancer Awareness month in October.

Rural Women New Zealand will donate profits from the sale of the plaster kits to the NZ Breast Cancer Foundation.

RWNZ National President Liz Evans says “We are delighted that the Wellington Young Farmers are supporting this campaign.  By creating personal sculptures, we hope these young women will be reminded to take a hands-on approach to regularly monitoring their breasts.”

Wellington Young Farmers Chairman Erica van Reenen says “We had great fun making our casts and it certainly broke down the barriers, as well as reinforcing the serious message behind this campaign.”

And the fun doesn’t stop there.  The women will be displaying their decorated breast sculptures at the Wellington Young Farmers’ Ball on 16 October, where they’ll be up for auction.

“As well as donating money to the NZ Breast Cancer Foundation through Rural Women New Zealand, we plan to raise extra funds from the auction for rural people affected by the Canterbury earthquake,” says Ms van Reenen.

You can find details on how to get a plaster kit and tickets to the ball at Rural Women NZ on the link above.


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