Rural round-up

17/06/2015

What to do when you have two farms and three sons – Kate Taylor:

After decades of hard work, 64-year-old David Humphries would have been debt-free on his two farms near Waipukurau by the end of next year. But he has three sons – all farmers. So he bought another farm.

It wasn’t a matter of three farms for three sons, but creating a business big enough and diverse enough to allow them all to do what they love and to make a living at it.

At 364 hectares, Glen Moraig was the original family farm with 324ha Awaraupo added later. Now 600ha Te Tui has been added to the business. It is on the same road, but 10km closer to Waipukurau. It is hoped the business will carry 11,000 stock units across the properties once development has been carried out on the new farm. . .

The Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP) gets caught on American rocks – Keith Woodford:

Last Friday (12 June) was a bad day for proponents of the twelve-country Trans Pacific Partnership. To the surprise of many, the American House of Representatives has thwarted, at least temporarily, President Obama’s request for fast-track authority. Without that authority, other countries will not put forward their bottom line positions.

The irony is that the House has in theory offered Obama exactly the fast-track authority that he needs. However, the differences between the House and Senate versions of legislation are such that in reality he has been defeated.

The importance of fast-track authority is that the American Congress would then only be able to accept or reject the TPP without amendment. Without that agreement, ratification becomes unmanageable. . .

Safe Relationship Seminars Applauded:

Rural Women New Zealand is partnering with the Sophie Elliott Foundation and the It’s Not Ok campaign to present a series of Safe Relationships seminars.

The purpose of the seminars is to increase awareness and education to stop domestic violence in rural communities. Lesley Elliott MNZM will be the guest speaker and the event will include discussion about what makes a safe relationship.

Lesley established the Sophie Elliott Foundation after the tragic death of her daughter, Sophie by her former boyfriend. Lesley says, “I applaud this initiative by Rural Women New Zealand and I am thrilled to have the opportunity to talk to rural groups. Domestic violence isn’t a problem just in towns and cities, every community and socio-economic group throughout the country is affected. . .

 

Consistency of New Zealand Lamb is Second to None:

Peter Gordon ONZM has been an ambassador chef for New Zealand lamb in the UK market since 1998. He credits the success of the 17-year partnership to the product itself.

“I fully and wholeheartedly believe in the product. I am not just doing this to earn a fee. I do it because I believe in New Zealand lamb. Without integrity, campaigns fall flat. I can easily demonstrate to the public the genuine enthusiasm I have in cooking it and showing others how to do so.

“As a chef, the quality of the produce I cook with is paramount. The consistency of New Zealand lamb is outstanding and second to none.” . .

 

NZ industry backs US meat labelling move:

The meat industry here is hoping the United States will dump its law requiring compulsory country of origin labelling for meat imports.

The House of Representatives has voted to repeal the law, in response to a World Trade Organisation (WTO) ruling that country of origin requirements for beef, chicken, pork and some other products discriminates against imports.

Canada and Mexico are proposing retaliatory trade penalties against the US after winning their WTO case.

The US Congress also needs to repeal the law for the compulsory labelling to be scrapped. . .

 Moocall now available in New Zealand & Australia:

 Moocall is expanding its international operations by making their calving sensor available for purchase in New Zealand & Australia. The devices will be on sale via au.moocall.com and also through some local distributers.

Moocall is a calving sensor, worn on a cows tail that measures over 600 data points a sec- ond to determine the onset of calving. The device then sends an SMS text alert to two mobile phones to ensure the cattle breeder can be on location when calving takes place.

Moocall was invented when Irish farmer Niall Austin, lost a calf and a cow due to an unexpected difficult calving. . .

Seeka’s commitment to innovation drives top avocado returns:

Seeka will harvest all of next season’s crop for its avocado growers using the new efficient blue plastic bins it has been introducing as part of its commitment to innovation, says Chief Executive Michael Franks.

Seeka currently has 6,000 of the bins in service and will be doubling the number this year. The Surestore bins were built by TCI New Zealand, with development and design strongly influenced by Seeka’s operational experience. The Surestore bins are stronger, safer to handle, easier to clean than wood, and are lighter, allowing more fruit to be loaded onto a truck. Importantly, they are also less damaging to the fruit and have helped improve the quality of harvested fruit. . .

 

 


Next Woman of Year nominations open

21/07/2012

Next Magazine is advertising for nominations for its third annual Woman of the Year awards.

Prizes will be awarded in six categories:

Arts and Culture: This award celebrates a woman who challenges boundaries and is a creative inspiration to others. She will have distinctive flair and originality. Working in arts or culture, her unique vision will have driven her to achieve a project that has touched the hearts and minds of New Zealanders.

Business and Innovation: This award acknowledges a great commercial and creative thinker. This woman has an entrepreneurial spirit and the confidence to challenge boundaries and conventional ideas balanced by a sense of professional responsibility. Via strategic thinking and leadership, she will have grown a business or developed a product or idea to achieve economic success. She will have created opportunity by both thinking outside the square and playing to her own strengths.

Community: Our society is founded on community-minded individuals who give of themselves to make a difference. This award celebrates one such woman who has contributed to a caring project in an outstanding way by championing a cause and addressing a social need. She will be a woman who has selflessly used her energy to empower others to reach their full potential.

Education: This award celebrates a woman who has made significant contributions to the learning and betterment of others. She will be a creative innovator who is ground breaking in her approach and committed to following her vision of helping people achieve and exceed their full potential.

Health and Science: This is an award for a great innovator in the area of health or science. She will be making ground breaking steps in an arena she is passionate about. She will have used her intellect and vision to discover or implement a new development that benefits the human race.

And Sport: This award pays tribute to a successful coach, sportswoman or administrator who has reached a notable physical goal or milestone. She will have been an inspiration for others along the way, showing mental conviction, physical strength and determination to excel in her chosen field. She will have displayed consistent sportsmanship and have a competitive spirit.

Women who excel in any of these areas are indeed worthy of recognition and they will be inspirational role models.

Last year’s winners were:

Arts and Culture: Jill Marshall, author and publisher
Business: Mai Chen, lawyer
Health and Science: Sue Johnson, Christchurch coroner
Sport: Jayne Parsons, Paralympian
Community: Lesley Elliott, founder of the Sophie Elliott Foundation who was also winner of overall Woman of the Year title.


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