Rural round-up

January 17, 2019

Dairy farmers leading charge to clean up water – Tim Mackle:

In the past week, I’ve opened two newspapers to two cartoons that constitute a cheap shot at dairy farming, both frustrating and offending the dairy farmers of New Zealand.

One cartoon portrayed a dairy cow polluting the sea, and the other showed dairy cows polluting a river.

My wish for 2019 is that all New Zealanders, cartoonists and media, are up with the play on what is actually happening on dairy farms before they make comment. . . 

Raspberry grower takes delight in ripening crop – Sally Brooker:

The canes at Matsinger’s Berry Farm are ”blazing with raspberries”, owner Leanne Matsinger says.

The family property at Peebles, in the lower Waitaki Valley, has been growing the sought-after fruit for about 30 years. Mrs Matsinger took over the business after her husband, Simon, died at the age of 45, nine years ago.

She said if this was her first season at the helm she might have been dismayed, but now she was ”more educated” about the fluctuations that occurred due to the climate. . . 

Alliance beefs up black stilts’ diet – Sally Rae:

Alliance Group might have customers in 65 countries but a group of long-legged consumers living in Twizel are among the most unusual.

Each week, ox hearts from Alliance plants are frozen and sent to the Smithfield plant, where they are put through a very specific process to meet requirements for the Department of Conservation’s captive breeding programme for endangered black stilts (kaki).

The hearts are thawed and trimmed of excess fat, then minced, refrozen and cut into blocks for delivery to the programme. . . 

Hemp deal to spin green yarn – Annette Scott:

A new strategic partnership between New Zealand Yarn and Hemp NZ is set to be the catalyst for market-leading hemp fibre processing.

It will lead development of innovative products developed from hemp yarn, wool and hemp blends and non-woven hemp products.

NZ Yarn is owned by Carrfields Primary Wool (CPW) and independent investors including farmers, wool growers and others passionate about the wool industry and showcasing NZ wool yarn on a global scale.  . . 

That was 2018 – now for 2019 – Allan Barber:

2018 is over and it’s now timely to look at how many of last year’s key challenges will continue into the New Year.

From a New Zealand domestic perspective the attempt to eradicate Mycoplasma Bovis has had the biggest impact on farming, most of it focused on the relatively small number of properties forced to cull their entire herd, some of it directed at those properties under surveillance or Notice of Direction, and some of it on the agricultural service industry, including meat processors, cartage contractors, stock agents and saleyards, as well as calf clubs and A&P shows.

Following calving MPI is optimistic the disease may have been eradicated which would be the first time any country has achieved such an outcome. However it is still too early to say with complete confidence the hitherto impossible has been achieved. 2019 will almost certainly be the year we know for sure, one way or the other. . . 

 

94-year-old ‘shepherding legend’ scoops prestigious award

A 94-year-old ‘shepherding legend’ has scooped an award dedicated to recognising farmers who make a significant contribution to farming in the Inner Hebrides.

Hill farmer Sandy McKirdy, from Dalmally in Bute, is this year’s recipient of the Stalwart award, presented annually by NFU Scotland.

The award was created in 2016 in recognition and memory two Inner Hebrides farmers, Bert Leitch and Lachlan MacLean, who passed away in 2015. . . 

Global timber and wood products market update:

Declining trade of softwood lumber, plummeting lumber prices in the US and slowing wood demand in China were some of the biggest international lumber developments in the 3Q/18, reports the Wood Resource Quarterly.

WRQ – 31 Years of Global Wood Price Reporting

Global Softwood Lumber Trade

Global trade of softwood lumber from January through September 2018 was down 2.5% as compared to the same period last year. China, Japan, the United Kingdom and the MENA region reduced their imports, while the US and continental Europe have imported more lumber this year than in 2017. . .


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