Rural round-up

01/05/2021

Canterbury irrigation scheme will hold farmers to account – Adam Burns:

Replacement consent for the Mayfield Hinds Valetta (MHV) irrigation scheme was granted after an independent commissioner released a decision last week.

The 10-year consent is subject to a series of conditions, including a 15 percent reduction in nitrogen losses by 2025 and 25 percent by 2030, auditing of farm environment plans, monitoring ground and surface water quality and remediation and response plans.

Environment Canterbury (ECan) can review the consent if improvements are unable to be achieved.

“This consent is granted on the basis that the significant adverse cumulative effects on the receiving environment will be reduced and there will be measurable environmental improvements within the consent term,” the hearing commissioner’s report states. . . 

Research into sheep farmers’ experiences – Annette Scott:

The call is out for New Zealand sheep farmers to help with a research project on the industry’s bioeconomic transition to sustainability.

Lincoln University Masters student Jemma Penelope is preparing to survey sheep farmers across all regions of NZ about their on-farm experiences and challenges as they strive for sustainability.

Penelope, currently undertaking her second Masters, is leading research projects that develop innovative solutions for the agri-food industry.

Having grown up and studied in Canterbury, Penelope then worked abroad in business management and conservation and environmental markets in several countries, including Australia, America and Canada, before realising a place for her back home. . . 

Sheep lead methane research – Richard Rennie:

A mob of low methane sheep are proving it is possible to produce less methane and grow a healthy, productive animal that farmers will want to put into their flock bloodlines in coming years.

For the past decade New Zealand scientists have largely flown below the radar with the work, but are enjoying world leading success in identifying high and low methane emitting sheep. 

The work means today researchers including AgResearch scientists, with the support of farmers through the Pastoral Greenhouse Gas Research Consortium  have two flocks of sheep, one high and one low methane emitting, and have established a genomic profile over three breeding generations. 

These provide sheep breeders with useful and accurate data on what their animal’s “methane value” is, relative to its breeding value. . . 

Directors returned to Silver Fern Farms co-operative board:

Rob Hewett, Co-Chair of Silver Fern Farms Limited has been re-elected to the Silver Fern Farms Co-operative Limited’s Board of Directors. Gabrielle Thompson, who was a Board Appointed Director, has also been elected to the Co-operative Board by farmer shareholders.

The Board was delighted with the calibre and number of candidates that put themselves for election. Those that were unsuccessful were William Oliver, Simon Davies, Rob Kempthorne and Charles Douglas-Clifford. We thank them for their ongoing commitment to Silver Fern Farms.

The total weighted vote represents 50.59% of total shares, compared to the 62.68% turnout in the previous election in February 2018. . . 

 

Lawson’s Dry Hills wins at the 2021 Cawthorn- Marlborough Environment Awards:

Lawson’s Dry Hills was awarded winner of the wine industry category at the 2021 Cawthron Marlborough Environment Awards, announced in Blenheim on Friday night.

In February, Lawson’s Dry Hills became a Toitu carbon zero certified organisation making the company the only New Zealand wine producer to be certified with both ISO14001 (Environmental Management) and ISO14064 (carbon zero).

The Awards judges praised Lawson’s Dry Hills for their commitment to reducing their environmental impact. Awards Coordinator and Judge, Bev Doole said, “These internationally recognised certifications reflect the culture at Lawson’s to improve and innovate across a wide range of areas, including recyclable and biodegradable packaging, generating solar power and storing water off the winery roof.” . . 

Central Otago’s oldest remaining stone packhouse on the market for sale:

The oldest standing stone packhouse in Central Otago, forming part of a sprawling lifestyle property, is on the market for sale.

Set in the heart of New Zealand’s original stone-fruit growing region, the 8.4-hectare property at 3196 Fruitlands-Roxburgh Road is offered for sale by Bayleys Cromwell for $1,560,000 plus GST (if any).

“The property, affectionately dubbed ‘Stonehouse Gardens’, offers a wonderful blend of home, income, lifestyle and priceless local history,” says Bayleys Cromwell salesperson Renee Anderson, who is marketing the property for sale with colleague Gary Kirk.

“Roxburgh and the Coal Creek area saw the start of stone-fruit cultivation during the 1860s gold rush, when the Tamblyn family first imported stone fruit trees from Australia,” Mr Kirk says. . . 

 


Rural round-up

23/07/2018

Sharemilkers vital, new section chairman says – Sally Rae:

A new farming leader believes sharemilkers are a vital part of New Zealand’s dairy industry.

Grant Tremewan has been elected as the North Otago Federated Farmers sharemilkers’ section chairman. He is passionate about sharemilking being retained as a viable pathway into farming and valued for its contribution.

”It’s the competitive advantage of the dairy industry, where much of its productivity and innovation comes from.

”I want to see sharemilkers treated fairly . .

Beingmate has muted Fonterra’s Chinese hum – Point of Order:

Fonterra is “humming” in China, according  to  a headline  in the  NZ  Herald,  although the  text  of the article beneath it mentioned  the  “woes”  associated with  the co-op’s investment  in Beingmate.

The  co-op  is having to absorb   an impairment of   $405m    on the value of its 18.8%  holding in Beingmate.  On top of the $183m payment it has had to make  French  giant  Danone, the  writedown  takes the gloss off that  otherwise  “humming”  performance.

Some of its farmer-shareholders may be looking over the  fence to  the rather different  outcome  for A2 Milk, which lifted its annual  sales  68% in the June year,  with  revenue   rising  from $549m in the June  2017 year  to  $922m.  During  the latest  year A2  Milk achieved gross margins  up  to  49%.   . .

Wallace Group extends Southland operations; achieves nationwide slink and casualty cow collection service:

Nationwide coproducts business Wallace Group today announced it had extended operations in Southland with the addition of a Mataura processing site, requiring around 20 seasonal contractors and 30 seasonal staff.

Wallace Group Chief Executive Officer, Graham Shortland says, “We’re very pleased to have extended our presence in Southland. The recycling of coproducts from the agricultural sector performs a valuable service for farmers and processors as well as protecting the natural environment from the impact of dead stock. . .

Otago/Southland named best Young Farmers’ region:

Otago/Southland has been named the country’s best NZ Young Farmers region.

The region’s members cheered excitedly when the award was announced in Invercargill.

“Our clubs are welcoming and well connected which ensures lots of interclub activities,” he said.

Marlborough wine – protecting and promoting the real deal:

A new initiative has been launched to safeguard Marlborough’s wine reputation and Lawson’s Dry Hills is among the first to jump on board.

The protection of ‘brand Marlborough’ has been under discussion for some years but with the proliferation of Marlborough Sauvignon Blanc labels over recent times, a group of key industry people led by Ivan Sutherland of Dog Point Vineyards, have been spurred into action. . .

Bayer Marlborough Young Viticulturist of the Year 2018 announced:

Congratulations to Ben Richards from Indevin who became the Bayer Marlborough Young Viticulturist of the Year 2018 on Friday 13th July.

This is the second consecutive year Richards has competed in the National Final, however he was representing Hawke’s Bay in 2017 as he was working at Indevin’s vineyards there and finishing his degree at EIT. At the start of this year he was promoted to Viticultural Technician for Indevin and moved to Marlborough, so is delighted to represent his new region in this year’s National Final. , ,

Honey venture big winner at North Maori business awards:

The efforts of a 100 percent Maori-owned company specialising in manuka honey production have been recognised with two awards, including the coveted Taitokerau Maori Business of the Year award.

Kaitaia-based Tai Tokerau Honey was named overall winner, as well as securing the Northland Regional Council’s Excellence in Environmental Awareness and Management category, when the business awards were held in Whangarei recently. .


Rural round-up

10/12/2014

Tasman dam plan put on hold:

Plans to build a dam in the Tasman District are being put on the backburner after a new report recommends that neither of the two proposed funding models for the project should be adopted.

A consultation period, followed by a series of public meetings and hearings has been held in recent weeks, with nearly 800 submissions received on the Waimea Community dam in the Lee Valley.

There has been fierce opposition to the two funding models, which called for 30 percent of the $80 million cost to be met by ratepayers. . .

Fonterra shifts ‘silo’ culture since WPC food scare – Fiona Rotherham:

 (BusinessDesk) – Fonterra Cooperative Group claims to have made significant progress on the entrenched “silo” mentality it was criticised for in the government’s final report into last year’s whey protein contamination scare.

Stage two of the government inquiry into the WPC80 recall has recommended the Ministry for Primary Industries beef up its ability to manage food safety, including statutory powers to force companies to disclose relevant information that could then be handed over to other affected parties.

Fonterra was caught up in a false food scare last year when it quarantined several batches of WPC amid fears it was contaminated with a potentially dangerous form of the clostridium bacteria, though was ultimately cleared as a false alarm. . .

Profit and food safety ‘top priorities’ – James Small:

Profit and food safety are a “balancing act”, said Chris Lewis, Federated Farmers Waikato president.

Earlier this year, Fonterra was fined $300,000 for an incident, which saw milk-products pulled off shelves when it emerged they were potentially contaminated with Botulism. 

The last of a series of independent reports was released today, and the inquiry, led by Queen’s Counsel Miriam Dean, found a number of errors were made. 

While food-safety protocols were in place, the culture of care around food safety had not been fostered.

“Its an everyday thing for farmers and also for Fonterra,” Lewis said. . .

Infant formula body welcomes inquiry report:

The Infant Nutrition Council (INC) welcomes the final report of the independent inquiry into last year’s whey protein concentrate incident, says Infant Nutrition Council Chief Executive Jan Carey.

INC represents marketers and manufacturers of infant formula.

“We are particularly pleased that the Government will be accepting all of the inquiry’s recommendations. In fact, many were already well advanced ahead of this report.

“If this inquiry has done nothing else it has shown very clearly that New Zealand has food safety standards that are as good, if not better, as any country in the world. . .

 

Confidence in Lawson’s Dry Hills Prompts Long Term Investors to Purchase Majority Shareholding:

The future of one of Marlborough’s leading wine producers is looking particularly rosy. Strong confidence in the quality and potential of Lawson’s Dry Hills, a pioneer of the Marlborough wine industry, has enticed two of the company’s long-term partners to invest further in the company.

After a 15 year involvement, investors Tim and Pauline Evill have purchased additional shares previously owned by the Lawson family, so as to take a majority interest. Key members of the management team have also shown their backing for the company: Sion Barnsley, General Manager for five years and Business Manager prior to that has increased his shareholding, while Chief Winemaker of eleven years, Marcus Wright and newly appointed Sales and Marketing Manager, Derek Lilley have also invested to become new shareholders. . .

 Airborne National Honey Week Returns in 2015 to Celebrate New Zealand’s Sweetest Natural Resource:

The Airborne National Honey Week is back for a second year in March 2015. Tying in with the end of the New Zealand honey season, it will be a celebration of the country’s sweetest natural resource, with a particular emphasis on the versatility, quality and uniqueness of New Zealand’s honey types.

Among other activities, public tastings around the country will give Kiwis the opportunity to taste the eight main varieties of New Zealand single flower honey types – from Kamahi and Clover to Manuka and Honeydew. Airborne Honey is also launching a nationwide honey challenge, inviting Kiwis to choose and share their favourite via social media. There are prizes on offer for those that share their top honey and use the hashtag: #NZHoneyWeek. Airborne Honey will be giving away a pack of six different premium monofloral honeys every day for two weeks starting onTuesday 17 March.

 


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