Rural round-up

January 26, 2018

Big drop in Otago farm sales, NZ sales down 21% – Simon Hartley:

Otago has recorded the largest decline in farm sales across the country, down by 27 on a year ago while nationally sales dipped 21%, down by more than 100 properties.
Ten of 14 regions recorded declines in farm sales for the quarter ended December, with Otago booking the most substantial decline, down 27 sales followed by Northland down 25 sales, while Southland was one of only three regions with an increase, up three sales.

Overall, farm sales nationally for the quarter plunged 105 from 499 for the same quarter last year to 394, according to Real Estate Institute of New Zealand data.

REINZ rural spokesman Brian Peacocke said the sales were a reflection of two key factors which impacted on the rural sector – weather and prices. . .

Is the 20-year white gold rush over for dairy industry? – Andrea Fox:

The country’s second biggest dairy manufacturer and exporter Open Country Dairy believes New Zealand milk production growth has peaked and a long run of muscular annual rises is over.

Chairman Laurie Margrain said the privately-owned company did not believe overall milk production would rise much higher than it is today.

“There will be seasonal variances due to weather of course but it’s not realistic to think New Zealand milk production will go through the growth curve it’s had in the past 10 years.” . . .

Warning after homekill prosecutions rise:

A spike in prosecutions for illegal homekill has prompted officials to warn people not to sell homekill on social media.

Information released to Radio New Zealand showed seven people were prosecuted in 2017, compared to one the year before.

And 44 sales of homekill on Facebook were reported to the Ministry for Primary Industries last year, 30 more than 2016.

Selling homekill is illegal, with fines of up to $75,000 for individuals and $300,000 for businesses. . .

Local rider chosen for trip to Texas – Tom Kitchin:

Ranfurly girl Amanda Voice says she feels lucky to be named in a team to represent New Zealand in Texas for western performance horse riding.
Amanda (15) will travel to the Texas city of College Station to compete in the American Quarter Horse Youth World Cup from June 28 to July 8.

”I’m just so happy with how it’s all gone,” she said.

”I’m very excited to represent New Zealand once again.” . .

How one dairy farmer works just 20 hours per year for every cow in his herd – Seán Cummins:

David Kerr milks a herd of 155 cows under a spring-calving system in Ballyfin, Co. Laois. He’s at the top of his game when it comes to efficiency and works just 20 hours per year for each cow in his herd.

When compared to his peers, David fits firmly within the top 5% of efficient farmers. The 20 hours per cow figure is more than 50% lower than the average number of hours worked by farmers surveyed in a recent Teagasc labour study.

At this week’s Irish Grassland Association Dairy Conference, David outlined the efficiency practices undertaken on his farm. . .

How does a show get its local community involved?

Country shows are a window into a community, showing how close knit its people are, and that community’s values.

However, bringing people together, organising judging events and entertainment takes some time and know-how. So it’s no surprise that as country town populations have taken a hit, the local show has also suffered.

A successful show requires involvement, and inclusion. But sometimes a show seemingly just happens because it has had a long established committee. The local community doesn’t necessarily understand what it can bring to the table, nor what goes into putting the event on. . . 


Foreign investors also make losses

February 12, 2012

Open Country Cheese blames its full year loss of $29.5m on the high Price of milk and our strong dollar.

The Auckland-based company has faced a kiwi dollar trading near a five-month high against the greenback in volatile global markets while global demand for commodities have helped drive up the price of milk, putting pressure on processing margins.

“It is clear that when this high degree of volatility is coupled with the commitment we have to produce competitive returns to our supply base we will have considerable more variance in our year to year trading results than desirable,” chief executive Steven Smith and chairman Laurie Margrain said in the annual report. . .

. . .  The dairy processor paid an average $7.56 per kilogram of milk solids to its farmer suppliers, a 24 percent increase from a year earlier. That’s short of the $7.60 per kg and 65 cents per share distributable Fonterra paid to its farmer shareholders.

Open Country is controlled by the Talley family and its second biggest shareholder is Singapore’s Olam International.

Will the people who are so upset at the thought of foreign investors taking New Zealand-made dividends be just as concerned about these ones having to take a loss.


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