Rural round-up

February 16, 2019

How this tiny New Zealand company is producing the best beef in the world – Katie Chang:

With wellness on the tips of everyone’s lips, seeking the best ingredients available – turns out, there’s truth to the adage “you are what you eat” – has never been a greater priority. While picking plum produce is fairly straightforward, making educated decisions about beef, unfortunately, isn’t so cut and dry. And here in the United States – where the average American was expected to down over a record-breaking 222 pounds of meat (including beef) in 2018 – it can be downright confusing.

Need proof? Head to the produce aisle of your favorite grocery store, pick up any vegetable or fruit, and look for its sticker. . . 

Are social media influences hurting our Ag industry? – Cheyenne Nicholson:

My guilty pleasure in life is watching mummy vloggers on YouTube. I’m a big fan of mum hacks, cleaning hacks and watching strangers go on lavish holiday. In the days when I first met hubby I could also occasionally be snapped watching a makeup tutorial or two as well.

On Monday morning while the babe was asleep and I was enjoying my morning coffee I clicked onto the latest video of one of my favorite mummy vloggers. All was well. Until she said “I still give my daughter (who is 1) formula because I’ve heard cows milk has pus and blood in it and I’m not sure what to do.” . .

Close calls spur farmer into action – Sean Nugent:

The view from Roys Peak is something special, but it is becoming ”dangerous” for visitors to experience it, the landowner says.

The track’s 100-space car park, barely a year old since being upgraded in late 2017, is bursting at the seams.

Each day it bulges and spills out on to the narrow Mt Aspiring Rd, and even the neighbouring farmland.

Department of Conservation senior ranger Annette Grieve said 83,296 people used the track last year, including an average of 480 daily visitors in December.

While the obvious solution to the parking woes would be to expand, Ms Grieve said there was no public conservation land left next to the car park to do so.

At least not now. . . 

Retiring Young Farmer contest  board members leave impressive legacy :

Two long-serving members of the board overseeing the FMG Young Farmer of the Year are set to retire.

Cole Groves, 32, and Dean Rabbidge, 33, will step down from the NZ Young Farmers Contest Board in July.

The pair first joined the committee in 2014, and both have a long history with the national agri-business contest. . . .

 

America can’t move its cheese – Lauren Justice:

Cheese, which has a limited shelf-life, is less valuable once it spends weeks in cold-storage, and producers are concerned that the glut and price drop that has come with it could eat into profits. Spot market prices for 40-pound blocks of cheddar fell around 25% this year from 2014 prices, while 500-pound barrels typically used for processed cheese declined 28%.

Cheese exports have suffered since Mexico and China, major dairy buyers, instituted retaliatory tariffs on U.S. cheese and whey. Cheese shipments to Mexico in September were down more than 10% annually, according to the U.S. Dairy Export Council trade group, and shipments to China were down 63% annually. . .

Rapid gene cloning technique to transform crop disease protection  :

Researchers have pioneered a new method which allows them to rapidly recruit disease resistance genes from wild plants and transfer them into domestic crops.

The technique called AgRenSeq or speed cloning has been developed by John Innes Centre researchers alongside colleagues in the United States and Australia to speed up the fight against pathogens that threaten food crops worldwide.

It enables researchers to search a genetic “library” of resistance genes discovered in wild relatives of modern crops so they can rapidly identify sequences associated with disease fighting capability. . .


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