Rural round-up

May 13, 2015

So You Want To Set Up Your Own Small Scale Milk Business? This Is What You Really need To Know – Milking on the Moove:

Well, it appears that there are lots of people in New Zealand (and the world) who want to either set up their own milk business or want to go mobile milking.

My goal is to set up a streamlined system that will allow others to start their own small scale dairy business.

My inbox is full of people asking me questions about how to set up their own milk business. I would spend 45 minutes to an hour replying to these emails from complete strangers. I did it because I want to promote small scale dairy & I want others to do well. . .

 Chinese infant formula and Synlait – the story moves on – Keith Woodford:

In recent weeks, I have been writing about Synlait’s new infant formula Akarola [here and here]. The Akarola project is a joint venture between China’s New Hope agri-food conglomerate (75%) and Synlait (25%) which has set out to market New Zealand made infant formula online direct to consumers through JD.com.

The strategy is based on cutting out the multiple layers of middle men and pricing the product at just a fraction of what Chinese consumers are used to paying. But the strategy can only work if Chinese consumers can be convinced that low price does not mean low quality.

I am on record as saying that the Akarola product has potential to be transformational in relation to the Chinese infant formula market. But others are not so sure. . .

Practical solutions for sustainable agriculture:

2015 is the UN designated International Year of Soils, and soil management will be a key feature of a series of one day workshops for farmers and horticulturists interested in finding ways of increasing sustainability on their farms.

The free events, kick-off in Ashburton and Timaru next week, then move north to Palmerston North and Pukekohe in early June. They are being run by the Foundation for Arable Research (FAR) and the Future Farming Centre (FFC), and are aimed at all growers of arable and horticultural crops.

FAR CEO Nick Pyke says it is clear that agriculture is entering a period of major change and that the workshops will help growers identify practical ways of introducing sustainable techniques and technologies onto conventionally farmed properties. . . .

 

Steak of Origin judge talks about competition:

A judge at last night’s Beef and Lamb Steak of Origin awards says New Zealand farmers are doing a fantastic job of producing great tasting beef – but need to be very careful about who’s processing their stock.

Forbes and Angus Cameron who farm at Ashhurst in Manawatu, won the supreme award last night at the 2015 Steak of Origin Grand Final with their angus sirloin.

Food writer and New Zealand Listener columnist Lauraine Jacobs was involved in judging the top 20 final steaks and said it was a privilege. . .

Waikato students win horticultural scholarships:

Two University of Waikato students have won horticultural scholarships that they hope will help open doors for them in the sector.

Rhiannon Bond, a bachelor of science and technology student, was awarded the $4500 Horticentre Trust Undergraduate Scholarship.
The scholarship will also allow Ms Bond to attend Horticulture New Zealand’s annual conference in Rotorua this July and she says jealously played a role in her applying for it.


Rural round-up

January 28, 2015

Repositioning NZ trade on the world stage:

Founder and Chairman of ANZCO Foods, Sir Graeme Harrison, is showing his unwavering commitment to New Zealand business by personally funding a Professorial Chair in Global Value Chains and Trade at Lincoln University.
The newly created position will contribute to the research and teaching at the specialist land-based university – but it will also come with a far wider reaching remit: to help lead change in the way New Zealand businesses engage globally throughout the value chain.   
 
Described by Lincoln University Vice-Chancellor Dr Andrew West as “an extraordinarily visionary and generous act”, the funded professorial chair will need a unique set of skills. “As well as carrying core academic responsibilities, we see the appointee becoming a leading spokesperson on global trade, particularly around the challenges facing New Zealand’s agricultural exports,” says Dr West. . .

Conviction for the illegal sale of home killed meat applauded:

Federated Farmers is applauding the Ministry for Primary Industries prosecuting a Northland man for selling meat which had not been processed in accordance with the Animal Products Act 1999.

The Chair of Federated Farmers Rural Butchers, Haydn Cleland says the successful prosecution shows the inspection regimes to protect the integrity of New Zealand’s food safety systems are working. . .

Caution not panic in kill plans – Alan Williams:

Farmers are taking a cautious line on stock for processing during an increasingly dry summer, booking them for two to three weeks ahead.

But they were ready to take them out if there was decent rain in the meantime, AFFCO Holdings interim general manager Rowan Ogg said.

In some cases farmers might have lambs booked in with more than one processor, he said. AFFCO had more stock than it could handle. . .

NZ lamb wool price rises to 3-year high on increased demand – Tina Morrison:

(BusinessDesk) – New Zealand lamb wool prices rose to a three-year high last week on increased demand for the fibre from clothing manufacturers in China.

The price for lamb wool jumped 10 cents to $6.10 per kilogram at last week’s North Island auction, matching a price last seen in January 2012, according to AgriHQ. The price for 35-micron clean wool, a benchmark for crossbred wool used for carpets and accounting for the majority of New Zealand’s production, was steady at $4.85/kg compared with the average price in auctions in both islands the previous week. Merino and mid-micron wool didn’t trade in the latest auction. . .

Sporting Stars Set to Choose Nation’s Top Lamb:

Iron Maidens Lisa Carrington, Sophie Pascoe and Sarah Walker are set to judge the ninth annual 2015 Beef + Lamb New Zealand Golden Lamb Awards, aka the Glammies.

The competition, supported by Zoetis, aims to find the most tender and tasty lamb in New Zealand, with categories for both farmers and retailers.

With the sporting superstars on the panel, alongside foodwriter, Lauraine Jacobs and head judge Graham Hawkes, entries will have to be of superior quality to impress this year.

Third time judge, Sarah Walker says she is thrilled to be involved in the competition once again. . .

NZ Forests Gain International Visibility:

With the acceptance of the NZ Forest Certification Association (NZFCA) as New Zealand’s PEFC Member, New Zealand forest growers gain visibility in the world’s leading forest certification system. “We are delighted to be accepted into membership of PEFC and to represent PEFC in New Zealand” says Dr Andrew McEwen, chair of NZFCA.

With more than 260 million hectares of certified forests, PEFC (Programme for Endorsement of Forest Certification) is the world’s leading forest certification system, promoting Sustainable Forest Management through independent third party certification. PEFC works throughout the entire forest supply chain to promote good practice in the forest and to ensure that timber and non-timber forest products are produced with respect for the highest ecological, social and ethical standards. Thanks to its eco-label, customers and consumers are able to identify products from sustainably managed forests. . .

 

 


Baking treasury is a treasure

March 9, 2011

When I’m given book vouchers I like to use them to buy a book which reminds me of the person who gave them to me.

When I came across  A Treasury of New Zealand Baking I knew I’d found the perfect way to redeem birthday gift vouchers.

They were given to me by my best friend’s mother and many of my childhood memories are grounded in her kitchen with the aroma of fresh baking filling the air.

She’s now in her 80s and still bakes regularly for her family, friends and the many charitable organisations in which she’s involved.

The book is a collection of recipes from New Zealand professional cooks and bakers. Edited by Lauraine Jacobs with photos by Aaron McLean, it was produced as a fundraiser for the Breast Cancer Foundation and is a treasure trove of delicious treats.

It includes old favourites – bran biscuits, banana cake, eccles cakes and mumbles;  fresh delights – aporo treat, blueberry sour cream slice, and tamarillo friands; and new twists on traditional recipes – fruity Anzac biscuits and ginger shortbread.

Recipes are clearly set out one to a page and each is accompanied by a photo.

Sometimes I buy a recipe book, salivate over the photos but rarely if ever cook from it. I do pour over the baking treasury with my mouth watering but I also use it and haven’t had a failure.

I’m not alone in appreciating this gem. Beattie’s Book Blog reports it has been judged the  best cookbook in the world, in the  prestigious 2010 Gourmand Awards. It was also proclaimed to be the best ‘Fund Raising, Charity and Community Cookbook’ in the Pacific.


Riverstone Kitchen

June 23, 2008

Lauraine Jacobs waxed lyrical about the delights of Riverstone Kitchen  duirng her guest chef slot on Nine to Noon this morning.

The praise is well deserved. Chef Bevan Smith serves delicious food in simple but elegant surroundings. Most of the fruit and vegetables served are grown on the property and he features as much local produce as possible.

If you’ve time, a wander round the adjourning gift shop run by Bevan’s mother, Dot, is a delightful way to finish your visit.


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