Rural round-up

01/02/2021

B+LNZ awaiting CCC’s recommendations:

Industry good group Beef + Lamb NZ (B+LNZ) says it is awaiting with interest what recommendations the Climate Change Commission (CCC) makes when it releases its draft blueprint for how the country could reduce its carbon footprint on February 1.

B+LNZ environment policy manager Dylan Muggeridge says they will be particularly interested in the advice the CCC provides on what proportion of emissions budgets and targets should be met by reducing absolute emissions of greenhouse gases as opposed to offsetting emissions through carbon forestry.

“B+LNZ has advocated for some time that the large-scale afforestation of swathes of hill country farmland into exotic forestry is not an appropriate long-term solution to the climate change problem,” Muggeridge said. . . .

 

Building people capability on Lanercost:

Growing people is as important as growing grass on Beef + Lamb New Zealand’s North Canterbury Future Farm Lanercost.

Developing skills in the individuals working on the 1310ha North Canterbury hill country farm is part of the Future Farm’s management plan and for manager Digby Heard, this means growing his knowledge about the administrative side of farming including recording and utilising farm data, financial management and compliance.

A skilled stockman, Digby has proven his worth in the physical operation of Lanercost, the challenge now is to further develop the skills he needs to take on future senior management roles within the industry without the administrative support he has been receiving at Lanercost. . . 

Be brave farmers. People are genuinely interested in what you do – Daniel Eb:

Urban Kiwis are interested in farming – they just need somewhere to see it in action. With that in mind, Daniel Eb, the man behind Open Farms, is encouraging farmers to be brave, open up their gates, and make farming relevant again.

In the very first Open Farms market research panel, a Kiwi mum told us something that stuck.

“I need to take my kids back to the source.”

She was talking about a sense of loss of the natural way of life. A yearning for realness, to get some dirt under the fingernails and reconnect with the places where nature and people meet – our farms. . .

 

Rates rise targets plantation forestry – Colin Williscroft:

Forest owners in the Wairoa district are unhappy at a recent targeted rates increase they believe is unfair, but other councils around the country have either already adopted or are considering similar moves.

The Wairoa District Council recently approved changes to its rating model that included new rates differentials.

The new rating system, which takes effect from July 1, consists of five differentials. Forestry carries the largest weighting at a differential of 4.0, with commercial at 1.6, residential at 1.0, residential properties valued at over $399,999 at 0.8 and rural at 0.7. . . 

Shedding sheep hot under hammer :

Bidding was competitive at the Mt Cass Station Wiltshire sheep sale in North Canterbury.  

Nearly 3500 sheep reached higher than expected prices at Sara and Andrew Heard’s farm and were sold to bidders from Kerikeri to Cromwell.

Wiltshires shed their fleece annually, have a large lean carcass, no dags and naturally high fecundity.

The Heards have been farming the breed for about 12 years because the hardy sheep do well on their 2500 hectare organic property, that spreads from the Waipara wine country to the coast. . . 

 

New ad campaign pushes back against ‘anti-meat’ sentiment :

A new advertisement campaign which aims to ‘push back’ against unbalanced and inaccurate coverage regarding red meat has been launched in Scotland.

Scotch Beef PGI and Scotch Lamb PGI hit TV screens across Scotland as part of a new January 2021 industry campaign.

The 60-second STV advert, developed by Quality Meat Scotland’s (QMS), began on 20 January and runs until 2 February. . . 


Rural round-up

27/02/2019

South Canterbury’s Opuha Dam an example for the country – Joanne Holden:

Opuha Dam is a water storage “success story” National MPs would like to see adopted around the country.

The 20-year-old dam was the first stop on Friday for National’s Primary Industries Caucus Committee – hosted by Rangitata MP Andrew Falloon – as they toured Mid and South Canterbury’s primary industry spots.

On the trip were MPs Nathan Guy, Jacqui Dean, Matt King, Hamish Walker, and List MP Maureen Pugh, who also visited Heartland Potato Chips in Washdyke, the Managed Aquifer Recharge in Hinds, and spoke to South Canterbury community members about the future of primary industries. . .

 

Farm conflicts in tourist hotspot – Neal Wallace:

A billionaire lives on a lifestyle property on one side of Chris and Emma Dagg’s Queenstown farm. On the other is a multi-millionaire.

Land Squeeze Dinkus 1The exclusive Millbrook Resort is nearby and actor Tom Cruise was a neighbour while filming in New Zealand.

The Daggs’ 424ha farm in the Wakatipu Basin between Queenstown and Arrowtown includes some of NZ’s most sort after land for residential development.

A short drive from Queenstown, the rural setting provides a desirable place for the rich and famous to live, putting pressure on landowners in a region short of land, houses and sections. . . 

Rain in Waikato a good start – more please, farmers say:

Rain in Waikato was good news for farmers but more is needed to keep the threat of drought at bay. 

Until the weekend, the region had only received 0.4 millimetres of rain leaving soil moisture levels dangerously low. 

Federated Farmers Waikato president Andrew McGiven said the 10 millimetres of rain received over the weekend “was a good start”.  . . 

Lanercost open to all farmers – Tim Fulton:

The first Future Farm is contributing to the rehabilitation of a bruised Canterbury farm and community. Tim Fulton reports.

Visitors to Lanercost can see its potential as a sheep and beef demonstration farm, the lessees say.

The North Canterbury hill country property near Cheviot is 1310ha modelled on a farm at Lincoln that has allowed the dairy industry to assess innovation.

Farmer Carl Forrester and Mendip Hills manager Simon Lee have a lease to run the 1310ha Lanercost in partnership with Beef + Lamb New Zealand and Lanercost’s owner, the T D Whelan Trust. . .

Loneliness in farming community is ‘heart-breaking’, police officers say

Police officers have highlighted how ‘heart-breaking’ it is to see some farmers suffer from extreme loneliness and isolation. The issue of loneliness in the farming community has been highlighted by Dyfed-Powys Police, who have a small team of specialist rural officers. PC Gerwyn Davies and PCSO Jude Parr are working closely with mental healthy charity the DPJ Foundation. They have referred several farmers to the charity for counselling and mental health support. . . 

Soil ecologist challenges mainstream thinking on climate change – Candace Krebs:

How cropland and pastures are managed is the most effective way to remedy climate change, an approach that isn’t getting the attention it deserves, according to a leading soil ecologist from Australia who speaks around the world on soil health.

“Water that sits on top of the ground will evaporate. Water vapor, caused by water that evaporates because it hasn’t infiltrated, is the greenhouse gas that has increased to the greatest extent since the Industrial Revolution,” said Christine Jones, while speaking at the No Till on the Plains Conference in Wichita in late January. . . 


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