The Clutha’s still there

July 16, 2012

We drove down the east side of Lake Dunstan before crossing over it at Cromwell on Wednesday evening.

The lake was formed – more than a little controversially – when the Clyde Dam was built.

It interrupts the flow of the Clutha River but the river is still there, feeding and in turn being fed by Lake Dunstan.

We crossed the Clutha again north of Luggate on our way home yesterday. The water looked just as it always has, even though it’s dammed at Hawea a few kilometres above the bridge.

I have no doubt it looks the same below the  Clyde Dam too even though both dams are owned by Contact Energy which, is a publicly listed power company.

In case that’s not clear, that means the state doesn’t own the dams and hasn’t for sometime.

Private ownership of the power companies operating on the Clutha River hasn’t affected the water and whoever may or may not own it. Why would the partial float of other energy companies have any affect on the water they use?


Justice

August 5, 2011

Police were criticised for charging the man whose tragic error led to his son drowning after the vehicle the father had been driving rolled into Lake Dunstan.

We might ask why they can’t have discretion in cases like this, but I do understand the danger of giving police the power which belongs to a judge and/or jury.

Judge Blackie who discharged Ashish Macwan  without conviction made that point:

 At his sentencing today Judge Blackie said he agreed with  Macwan’s lawyer that his “carelessness was minimal”.   

The police did not oppose the discharge without conviction and Judge Blackie said it was right for the police to bring the matter to court.   

“It is not for the police to decide the outcome, but the court.”  

That is a just outcome for a tragic case.

No punishment could be greater than the knowledge that Macwan’s carelessness, however minimal, led to the death of his son.

But that decision should be the judge’s not the police’s.


Monday’s quiz

February 1, 2010

1. Through which seven countries does the Amazon River flow?

2. Who said, “I like to see life with its teeth out.”?

3. Which two rivers used to meet at Cromwell before Lake Dunstan was formed?

4. Who is New Zealand’s Minister of Statistics and Land Information?

5. What’s a  sgian dubh?


Sunday Social

August 31, 2008

We came over to Wanaka on Friday evening and were greeted by a starry sky. That promised a hard frost, which we got, but it was worth it for the views from Mount Iron of blue skies, snow clad mountains and millpond lake.

We spent most of the day at Millers Flat. The road there from Wanaka goes past Lake Dunstan and through Alexandra. The grape vines we passed en route were still wearing winter clothes but the cherry trees were in blossom.

The recent snow and rain have replenished moisture levels in the soil and the pasture is starting to change from winter brown to spring green.

Wanaka gave us another frost and sunny skies this morning but there’s work to be done back home so we can’t stay to enjoy it.


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