Rural round-up

September 7, 2015

Drones monitor Fiordland’s rainbow trout – Hamish Clark:

Fish & Game is using drones to monitor prized rainbow trout spawning at one of the world’s top fishing spots.

The remote location is the Upper Waiau River, which runs from Lake Te Anau and borders Fiordland National Park.

At the moment fishing is off-limits, as the trout are busy spawning and burying their fertilised eggs. . . 

World-first Kiwi technology can be a big boost to lucrative forestry industry:

A Christchurch company believes it can add tens of millions of dollars to the multi-billion forest industry by cutting-edge hi-tech testing to find out which trees are suitable for the booming housing and building construction markets.

Fibre-gen has produced a world-first harvester head mounted sonic tool, the HITMAN PH330, which measures the strength of trees to see if they are suitable or not for high-end building construction. There are no known direct competitors in the global market as yet.

Fibre-gen is the leader in forest wood segregation sonic technology tools and was a finalist at the 2015 New Zealand Hi-Tech Awards. It has entered the New Zealand Innovators Award, with finalists being named next week on September 10. It is also a finalist in the 2015 Champion Canterbury Business Innovation Awards with winners being named in Christchurch on September 16. . . 

New Chairman leads New Zealand Young Farmers into the future

Jason Te Brake has been elected the new Chairman for New Zealand Young Farmers. Mr Te Brake takes the helm after Cole Groves stepped down after two years in the role.

Mr Te Brake has served on the Board as an elected member since May 2013, in this time he has taken on the role of Vice-Chairman and the Chairman of the National Committee of New Zealand Young Farmers. Mr Te Brake joined Young Farmers in 2010, and while he first joined with social intentions, Jason quickly found his way into governance. . . 

Community groups receive $918,000 in War on Weeds funding:

Conservation Minister Maggie Barry has announced a $918,000 commitment to the War on Weeds through this year’s round of Community Conservation Partnerships Fund grants.

$500,000 will go to a significant joint programme run by Weedbusters NZ and the QEII National Trust, and will be used to fund voluntary weedbusting efforts by community groups, alongside regional and local councils.

An additional $418,000 will go to other projects tackling problem plants such as old man’s beard, banana passionfruit and other members of the Dirty Dozen weeds launched on August 27. . .

‘Young Hort’ winner calls for more primary industry diversification:

The downturn in prices confronting dairy farmers is a timely reminder to those in horticulture to consider crop diversification now, while kiwifruit, pipfruit and wine exports are booming.

Outgoing New Zealand Young Horticulturist of the Year (YHOY) title holder and Whangarei kiwifruit grower, Patrick Malley, believes local farmers can learn from the diversification practices of their Californian counterparts.

Malley was speaking after just having returned from a fact finding travel scholarship to the United States, which was part of his prize for winning the NZ Young Horticulturist of the Year 2014 competition.

While the dairy industry is at the bottom of its commodity cycle, the kiwifruit and pipfruit industries arebooming, making it a good time to think about diversifying crop types to spread risk and create stability through commodity cycles. . . 

Let Ballance get your career started:

Soil scientists, engineers and farmers to vets, bankers and regulators, there are a wide range of careers which Ballance Agri-Nutrients is proud to support with its annual scholarship programme.

Warwick Catto, Science Strategy Manager at Ballance said the co-operative was always excited to see student talent interested in primary industry careers.

“The recent unprecedented interest in our dairy and red meat sectors sets the backdrop for the importance the sector has on New Zealand’s future growth and our place in the world.” . . 

Zespri launches new $15,000 scholarships:

Zespri has announced two new $15,000 scholarships to encourage New Zealand’s top secondary students to pursue a career in New Zealand’s fast-growing kiwifruit industry.

Zespri General Manager Grower & External Relations Dave Courtney explains that Zespri is looking to support and encourage tomorrow’sleaders into the horticulture sector.

“Kiwifruit is a global business; our industry earned $1.6 billion in sales revenue last year and we’re set to grow strongly over coming years. . . 

Canterbury Dairy Farmers Thrive On Environment Competition Experience:

Ashburton sharemilkers Sara and Stuart Russell have always strived to make their dairy operation as sustainable as possible. Entering the Canterbury Ballance Farm Environment Awards helped them confirm they were on the right track.

“We wanted to see how our business compared with others, and we wanted to find out what we could do to improve in future,” says Sara.

She and Stuart, a former builder, 50:50 sharemilk 700 cows on 252ha (effective), south of Ashburton. The farm is owned by Sara’s parents Rick and Diana Bourke via the Bourke Family Trust.

The Russells entered the 2015 Canterbury Ballance Farm Environment Awards (BFEA) and won the LIC Dairy Farm Award in their first time in the competition. . . 

Free service boosts feed efficiency for dairy farmers:

In a bid to help dairy farmers in tight times, GrainCorp Feeds has announced that 150 clients nationwide will receive free access to a feed forecasting, tracking and monitoring service.

GrainCorp Feeds is working with technical specialists DairyClub to provide additional on-farm assessment, monitoring and technical support alongside Tracker™, an online tool which measures current milk production and shows how the farmer can use supplementary feed to achieve maximum return.

GrainCorp Feeds general manager Daniel Calcinai says to increase income from milk production, farmers have to feed strategically, which means the right feed at the right time. . . 

Rural round-up

September 6, 2015

Farmers frustrated with increased poaching – Mike  Watson:

Kit Sandall shakes his head.

Normally mild mannered, the Awatere, Marlborough, sheep farmer is bemused by the sentencing of a helicopter pilot caught poaching on his property earlier this year.

Sandall was reacting to a report that the pilot, Dean Matthews, of Renwick, had been fined $2000 for unlawful hunting after being caught on film poaching on Sandall’s land in April.

The maximum penalty for the court to uphold is $100,000 fine, and/or $200,000 for corporate offending.

Sandall received the $2000 fine payment as reparation but he is still shaking his head. . . 

It’s all about teamwork for Duncan and Anne-Marie Wells – Sonita Chandar:

An award-winning Otago farming couple credit their success to hard work and good governance.

Duncan and Anne-Marie Wells who farm at Outram were this year’s Supreme winners of the Dairy Business of the Year competition.

The couple who are 50 per cent equity shareholders in the business, say the support they receive immeasurable. . .

Crop spraying drone approved:

An unmanned crop-spraying helicopter has become the first drone to be approved for commercial work under new aviation rules.

The Yamaha Rmax, reportedly costing $120,000, on Thursday received the Civil Aviation Authority’s first certification to be used as a commercial unmanned aerial vehicle.

Before August 1, the old rules meant it could not have been used because of its weight (at nearly 100kg) and the intention to use chemicals. . . 

NZ Farm Environment Trust/Balance Farm Environmental Awards:

The lingering effects of the devastating PSA outbreak didn’t stop Bay of Plenty Kiwifruit growers Stephen Kenna and Phillipa Wright entering the Bay of Plenty Ballance Farm Environment Awards.

“We are passionate about the Kiwifruit industry, despite its biosecurity issues, and we thought we had a good story to tell,” Stephen says.

He and Phillipa run a 15ha orchard at Ongare Point, north of Katikati. Like many kiwifruit growers they were hit hard by the vine disease PSA-V, but the couple’s positive attitude and careful planning have helped them cope with the disaster. This impressed judges of the 2015 Bay of Plenty Ballance Farm Environment Awards (BFEA), who awarded the operation three category awards, including the Hill Laboratories Harvest Award. . . 

Nominations open for 2015 Fresh Carriers Hayward Medal

The Fresh Carriers Hayward Medal judging panel is once again calling on the kiwifruit industry to nominate their finest leaders for the 2015 award.

The kiwifruit Industry Advisory Council (IAC) set up the Hayward Medal four years ago to honour the people who have led the industry and established it as a New Zealand export success story, selling more than $1.57 billion of premium-quality Zespri Kiwifruit last year.

IAC chairman Paul Jones says nominations are encouraged for people right across the industry who’ve shown excellence, commitment and leadership. . . 

Fonterra holds Aussie price but gives a warning :

Fonterra Australia has told its farmers to be prepared for the possibility of a step-down in milk price this season.

At the same time it held its farmgate opening price at $5.60 a kilogram of milksolids as part of review.

Fonterra Australia managing director Judith Swales said the company had put its Australian farmgate price and forecast closing price range for this season “under review given the challenging conditions and extreme volatility that are impacting domestic and global dairy markets”. . .

Nurse Loves Farmer's photo.

Rural round-up

August 16, 2015

Ripe opportunity for kiwifruit grower:

The country’s biggest kiwifruit grower, post-harvest operator Seeka, is about to become Australia’s biggest kiwifruit producer as well.

Seeka grows and packs kiwifruit from Northland to Hawke’s Bay.

It has signed an agreement to buy the kiwifruit and orcharding business of Bunbartha Fruit Packers, based in the Goulburn Valley in Victoria, one of Australia’s main fruit growing regions.

Seeka chief executive Michael Franks said it would diversify the company’s fruit production and its supply base. . . 

Service sector must work with farmers – Neal Wallace:

A slowdown in dairy farmer spending is sending the first tremors of a slowing rural economy through rural NZ, prompting industry leaders to turn to history for a blueprint on how to farm through the downturn.

Farm budgets were being reviewed, vets reported falling demand, Canterbury feed grain prices fell $80 a tonne, winter grazing and maize growing contracts were being cancelled and non-existent demand for heifers and in-calf cows sent prices tumbling.

Meanwhile, farming and sector leaders were urging financiers to work with farming clients, to acknowledge they were part of a solution and to not apply excessive pressure, especially during calving and mating. . . 

Kiwi Joint Venture Sells Meat Scanner Software to Multi-National:

Scanning technology that has advanced quality control in New Zealand’s red meat industry, saving millions of dollars a year, has been sold to the multi-national precision instrument-maker Mettler Toledo for an undisclosed sum.

The scanner uses New Zealand-developed software to make instantaneous measurements of fat content of red meat on conveyer belts before the product leaves the processing plant for overseas markets.

Red meat is sold internationally based on its fat content – a measurement known as ‘chemical-lean’ or CL. Different markets require different CL measurements. . . 

Fonterra and China – Keith Woodford:

There is no escaping that Fonterra’s path forward has to be closely linked to China. No-one else needs and has the ability to pay for New Zealand milk in the quantities that we have available to supply.

Whether that means we are over-exposed is a matter of perspective. But that perspective does not alter the reality that China is the opportunity. Whether or not the associated risks also become a reality is largely up to Fonterra itself.

The last fifteen years should have been easy for Fonterra. The world has wanted milk. New Zealand and others have been there to produce it. On a rising tide all boats are lifted. With the wind at one’s back, it is easy to smile. . . 

Morrisons to create new milk brand for farmers

Morrisons will sell a new milk brand which will see 10p per litre extra paid to farmers, the supermarket says.

The Milk for Farmers brand means a four pint bottle (2.27 litres), which now sells for 89p, will cost an extra 23p.

Other retailers have similar deals, but dairy organisation AHDB Dairy said 10p would make “a considerable difference”. . . 

NZ wool prices ahead of year earlier levels amid limited supply, continued demand – Tina Morrison:

(BusinessDesk) – New Zealand wool prices were little changed at the latest weekly auction, but are ahead of year earlier levels, underpinned by limited supply and strong demand.

The price for clean 35-micron wool, a benchmark for crossbred wool used for carpets and accounting for the majority of New Zealand’s production, was unchanged at $6.15 per kilogram at yesterday’s North Island auction compared with the previous week’s South Island auction, but 5.1 percent ahead of the $5.85/kg it sold for at the same time last year, according to AgriHQ. The price for lamb wool held at $7.20/kg from the previous week’s auction, and was up 31 percent from $5.50/kg a year earlier. . . 

Young Grower talent from Pukekohe wins national title:

Hamish Gates from Pukekohe was named Young Grower of the Year 2015 last night at the Rydges Latimer in Christchurch.

Hamish secured his place at the national competition after being named New Zealand Young Vegetable Grower 2015 in April. The carrot washline supervisor works for AS Wilcox & Sons in Pukekohe.

The final phase of the competition saw five regional champions battle it out in a series of practical and theoretical challenges that tested their essential industry knowledge and skills. . . 

Government easing constraints to agricultural innovations:

Agcarm commends the government for tabling a Bill to improve access to the latest innovations in veterinary medicines and agrichemicals, helping New Zealand agriculture to remain competitive.

Agcarm chief executive, Mark Ross says “We applaud the government for supporting primary production, by encouraging the registration of new products from overseas and new uses for existing products.

“This means New Zealand can remain competitive in a global market,” he added.

Greater protection provides more incentive to bring new technologies into New Zealand. Often these technologies are safer and more effective forms of chemical or biological compounds, or new ways for existing products to be used. . . 

Rural round-up

August 12, 2015

Corker porker stalkers thwarted – Mark Price:

Hunters tempted to ”farm” wild deer or pigs before hunting competitions are likely to be out of luck at the Upper Clutha Deerstalkers Association competition later this month.

The association, which is holding its popular annual competition for the third time, has changed its rules, mainly to encourage more interest in hunting among women and children.

But the changes also aim to sideline hunters who manipulate the competition process by allowing wild deer or pigs to graze crops on farmland over the winter. . .

Ambitious project still growing – Lynda van Kempen:

An international curling rink in Naseby? It seemed a lofty goal more than 15 years ago, but a decade on from its opening the facility is still going strong and exceeding all expectations.

”People seeing it for the first time tend to be a bit bemused at finding a facility of this standard in the middle of what they call nowhere – but what we call the centre of the universe,” Maniototo Curling International (MCI) rink manager Ewan Kirk says. . .

US beef cow repopulation – the rebuild begins:

After the drought-induced decline in the US beef cow herd in recent years, the industry is making a mends and rebuilding its depleted numbers, with expectations to grow by more than three million head in the next three-to-five years.

With around 50 per cent of New Zealand’s beef exports destined for the US, the rebuilding of the US cow herd may impact the strong demand for Kiwi beef seen in recent years, according to Rabobank. . .

Zespri opens Singapore office:

Prime Minister John Key has officially opened Zespri’s new sales and marketing hub in Singapore, which has been set up to manage the kiwifruit industry’s growth.

Zespri chair Peter McBride says it was an honour to have the Prime Minister open the new office.

“Volumes of Zespri SunGold Kiwifruit are set to grow strongly in the next few years and Zespri is investing in its market capability to deliver this growth for New Zealand growers,” he says. . .

The Internet of Stings: WiFi for your beehive:

New Zealand based beekeeping technology company, Hivemind Ltd, have released a new WiFi beehive scale and smartphone app that will allow urban beekeepers, bee educators and researchers, to better monitor their bees and more easily share their knowledge about these vitally important pollinators. A crowdfunding campaign for the product is currently live on the indiegogo platform here:

The importance of bees in our environment is a highly topical and important issue gaining increasing coverage. Beekeeper and hive numbers are continuing to increase in New Zealand with over 5000 registered in 2014.  . .


Game on for children to raise farm safety awareness:

A new free online farm safety game that children can play on smartphones, computers and tablets is the latest innovation in the quest to improve farm safety.

Industry body DairyNZ’s cowbassador, Rosie the Cow, has teamed up with WorkSafe and ACC to create Farm Rules!, an engaging way for primary school children to learn about the risks involved with certain farm activities and how to minimise or avoid them. . .

You can download the game here.


Rural round-up

July 23, 2015

Potential for dairy farmers to increase income from calves:

In a welcome departure from dismal news on the dairy front, farmers are being told that a simple change to their herd mating plans could increase their income from calves.

The advice is one outcome from the Beef + Lamb New Zealand Dairy Beef Integration Programme which is looking at the impact of using good beef genetics in a dairy beef supply chain.

The aim of the AgResearch managed research is to confirm the impact the strategy could have for dairy farmers and others in the supply chain. Early results show clear advantage – and potential additional profit – to dairy farmers from the use of proven beef genetics. . .

 Tiny mite a buzzkill for NZ’s wasps: – Nick Butcher:

A Landcare Research scientist says a tiny mite found on the back of wasps could be helping control the spread of the pests, which sting the country’s primary industries by about $130 million a year.

Wasps also pose a hazard to people and harm the native bird population by competing with them for food, including honeydew and other insects.

Dr Bob Brown discovered the unnamed mite in 2011. He said his studies showed wasp nests infested with the mites were 50 to 70 percent smaller than uninfested nests. . .

Efforts continue to get to the bottom of NAIT puzzle – Allan Barber:

The saga continues, as my Warkworth friend attempts to find out how NAIT intends to ensure correct reconciliation of livestock records, but as yet without a totally satisfactory answer. After further contact, NAIT’s acting Group Manager Sam McIvor replied with answers to the main points raised and I understand the conversation will continue, as both parties try to convince the other of their respective point of view.

At its most basic, the debate centres round the issue of ensuring 100% accuracy which is only possible, if there is 100% retention of tags at the time of stock movement or every animal has a second or reserve tag. At present NAIT estimates there is 98% retention. My friend who came through the mad cow disease disaster as well as FMD outbreaks in the UK is adamant the only acceptable position is 100% accuracy in the event of a disease outbreak. . .

Duncan Coull New Shareholders’ Council Chairman:

Duncan Coull has been elected unopposed to the position of Chairman of the Fonterra Shareholders’ Council.

Mr Coull was first elected to the Council in 2010 to represent Fonterra Farmers in Otorohanga and served as the Council’s Deputy Chair for the past 12 months.

Mr Coull: “It is a privilege to be elected to lead the Council and I thank Councillors for the support I continue to receive. . .

 New Zealand Kiwifruit Growers Incorporated Annual General Meeting:

New Zealand Kiwifruit Growers Incorporated (NZKGI) held its Annual General Meeting today, Wednesday 22 July 2015, updating growers on its key projects and reflected on a successful year.

NZKGI President, Neil Trebilco, says grower confidence and orchard values have continued to increase over the last twelve months.

“The main factors in this increasing optimism are the reduced effects of Psa and increasing OGRs per tray, particularly for Green. . .


Dairy farm prices stalling, lifestyle blocks strong, REINZ data shows – Fiona Rotherham:

(BusinessDesk) – Farm sales are down 9 per cent in the year to June and dairy farm prices have begun a slight downward trend, according to the latest Real Estate Institute of New Zealand data.

There were 62, or 11.5 percent, fewer farm sales for the three months ended June, compared to the same period a year ago and the overall year to date is down 9 percent to a total of 1,737 farms sold.

The median price per hectare for all farms sold in the three months to June was $29,141, compared to $26,634 in the same period the previous year, up 9.5 percent. But the All Farm Price Index, which adjusts for differences in farm size, location and farming type, rose by just under 1 percent in June compared to the same month in 2014. . . .

Expert’s visit fruition of relationship cultivation:

Feijoas and Kiwifruit have been on the menu as Lincoln hosted a plant specialist recently to initiate closer working ties around food production with a Chinese province of 90 million people.

Feijoa expert Dr Meng Zhang, of Southwest University of Science and Technology (SWUST) in Sichuan Province, spent a month with Lincoln University and the Bio-Protection Research Centre (BPRC) at Lincoln specifically to learn more about New Zealand horticulture production systems, biological protection and bio-control.

The visit comes a few months after SWUST’s President, Jun-bo Wang, and Director Guan-zhi Zhang, were in Lincoln as part of a large Sichuan trade delegation intended to further extend co-operation between the two institutes. . .


Weaker New Zealand Dollar Helps Wool Prices:

New Zealand Wool Services International Limited’s General Manager, Mr John Dawson reports that the weakening New Zealand dollar helped local prices this week with most types increasing by the corresponding currency change.

The weighted indicator for the main trading currencies was down 2.04 percent compared to the last sale on 9th July.

Of the 7,900 bales on offer from the South Island, 88 percent sold with types suitable for in the grease shipments coming under strong competition. . .

New production quality accreditation for animal feed:

New Zealand animal feed manufacturers now have a quality of production accreditation.

FeedSafeNZ is a new accreditation available to New Zealand Feed Manufacturers Association (NZFMA) members who pass independent audit standards as to quality of feed production. The FeedSafeNZ accreditation has two main aims: to provide safe feed for animals and thereby to protect the safety of human food.

Michael Brooks, NZFMA Executive Director says, “High quality feed is vital not only for the health and wellbeing of animals but also for humans, so it’s imperative that feed is manufactured to strict guidelines and is packed and stored correctly to ensure its quality is maintained. . .


Rural round-up

May 14, 2015

Drought conditions remain in South Island:

Primary Industries Minister Nathan Guy says farmers throughout the eastern South Island are still feeling the effects of drought, particularly in North Canterbury.

“It’s likely the medium-scale adverse event classification will remain in place until August or September this year, depending on conditions over autumn,” says Mr Guy.

“Despite recent rainfall, farmers and growers are still feeling the impacts of these prolonged dry conditions.

“In particular, the driest area is around Cheviot in North Canterbury which has been largely missed by most of the recent rainfall. . .


Drought takes its toll – feed an issue:

Federated Farmers North Canterbury say farmers affected by the drought are facing a tough year ahead and will be struggling with some tough decisions.

“It is not a great time for farmers in North Canterbury, most of us are facing a year of little to no feed, low stocking rates and substantial financial losses,” says Dan Hodgen, Federated Farmers Meat & Fibre Chair. 

“With the drought leaving us with a significant lack of grass and crop growth, we are either having to sell capital stock at a much lower rate than we usually would or having to buy in supplementary feed. Some farmers are doing both.” . . .

El Niño pattern blow to Canterbury farmers – Susie Nordqvist:

North Canterbury farmers already in the grip of their worst drought in 60 years have been dealt another blow today.

NIWA says we are on the cusp of an El Niño weather pattern, meaning things are about to get even drier in the east and wetter in the west.

Canterbury’s trademark Nor’west winds are exactly what drought-stricken farmers don’t need.

“When you just get the wind likes this it’s stripping out the moisture in it,” says Federated Farmers north Canterbury president Lynda Murchison. . .

Relentless drought and El Nino means more water storage needed:

Today it was confirmed that drought conditions in the South Island will likely drag on until September this year, emphasising the risk of dry weather patterns to New Zealand and highlighting the need for regional water storage and irrigation infrastructure,” says Andrew Curtis, IrrigationNZ CEO. “These conditions are only likely to worsen in the long term and spread to other parts of the country as a predicted El Nino weather pattern sets in.”

Concerns about how these warm weather patterns will impact our economy were set out in a recent International Monetary Fund report

( As part of its findings, the report recommended further investment in irrigation. . .

Bay of Plenty set for good growth:

The Bay of Plenty region and its industries could grow substantially thanks to its resource, population, location and climate advantages, a newly published report reveals.

Economic Development Minister Steven Joyce and Primary Industries Minister Nathan Guy today released the Bay of Plenty Regional Growth Study, which shows that the region has a number of natural advantages and is well placed to attract further investment, raise incomes and increase employment.

“This study provides a detailed summary of the opportunities for the Bay of Plenty’s future,” Mr Joyce says. “It outlines the potential of the primary sector, manufacturing and tourism industries in particular to grow the region. . . .

Kiwifruit industry set for strong growth, thanks Prime Minister for support:

The kiwifruit industry came together to thank the Government for its support with efforts to manage the bacterial disease Psa, when the Prime Minister John Key visited Zespri’s Mt Maunganui office this afternoon.

Zespri chairman Peter McBride says senior representatives of postharvest, growers and industry organisations took the opportunity to show the Prime Minister how far the industry has come since Psa was first discovered in New Zealand in 2010.

“It’s hard to recall now just how uncertain and dark those days were, when we simply did not know how the industry could continue with Psa. . .



Rural round-up

May 3, 2015

Westland Milk building $40m plant in Canterbury –

The West Coast’s dairy co-operative is ramping up its Canterbury presence by building a $40 million plant to make long life milk at Rolleston.

Westland Milk Products has begun building the plant in its first venture into retail-ready liquid milk at the Izone industrial park. The long life product known as UHT milk for its ultra high temperature processing usually has a shelf life of six to nine months and is usually used in hot climates.

Commercial production is scheduled to begin early next year and the plant will be capable of packing more than 50 million litres of UHT milk and cream a year. The product will mainly be sold into China’s UHT market, where returns are high and growth prospects are strong. . .

Farmers borrow $60m for environment projects –  Tim Cronshaw:

Farmers are borrowing big money for environmental projects on their farms with one bank alone lending more than $60 million.

The loans are on top of farmers funding waterway fencing and other projects from farm cashflows and savings.

ASB bank has provided low interest loans for more than 500 farm projects through its Rural Environmental Compliance Loan so farmers can fence, plant trees and put in culverts to keep stock away from streams and do other projects such as meeting their environmental compliance obligations by upgrading or building new effluent ponds.

Farmers have taken out an average loan of $105,000 with the bank. . .

Top Farmers Recognised in This Year’s Ballance Farm Environment Awards:

The 2015 Ballance Farm Environment Awards have produced another exceptional line-up of Supreme winners.

Award ceremonies in the ten regions participating in the annual competition have been completed and Supreme Winners from each region will now contest the highly-prized National Winner title.

Simon Saunders, chairman of the New Zealand Farm Environment Trust (NZFE), says the calibre of entrants in this year’s competition was again very high, making it tough for judges to select the finalists let alone the Supreme Winners. . .

New Zealand Merino and Landcorp fashion new market for ‘carpet’ wool:

New Zealand strong wool, renowned for its use in carpets, is set to become world famous for a new use – on people’s feet.

Danish footwear firm Glerups has signed a two-year deal with The New Zealand Merino Company (NZM) and New Zealand’s largest farming company, Landcorp to exclusively supply New Zealand strong wool for its indoor shoe range.

The “addictive” indoor shoes, renowned for comfort, warmth and durability, are felted in 100% pure natural wool with soft leather soles. They are sold throughout Denmark and in more than 20 countries, including New Zealand ( . .

HortNZ taking water concerns to govt:

The national horticulture industry body is taking its concerns about an Environment Court ruling on water quality to the Government as it can not afford to go through legal channels, it says.

Horticulture New Zealand is concerned about the court’s decision to uphold an appeal from Ngati Kahungunu, in Hawke’s Bay, against proposed changes to water quality provisions in the regional plan there.

HortNZ natural resources manager Chris Keenan said the court’s interpretation effectively meant the quality of every single water body must be managed in a way which ensured it was maintained or enhanced.

However, that was unworkable because it could be used to challenge any land development for any purpose. . .

Meat giant playing catch-up on antibiotics:

Plans by a major meat producer to stop using human antibiotics in its chickens means it will be playing catch-up with New Zealand, this country’s industry says.

US-based multinational Tyson Foods – one of the world’s largest meat producers – has announced it will stop using human antibiotics in its US chicken flocks raised for meat.

The company’s chief executive Donnie Smith said the company wanted to take similar steps overseas and in other farming operations.

“We’ve also started talking to independent farmers who supply us with cattle and hogs and turkeys about working towards reducing the use of human antibiotics on those farms as well.” . . .

Gold Kiwifruit Exports to Australia up; Green Consistent – Industry to launch its first marketing campaign in Australia:

The export of New Zealand kiwifruit to Australia has begun and is showing signs of the recovery of GOLD Kiwifruit from Psa.

A hot, dry New Zealand summer will see increased volumes of GOLD exported to Australia, however the volume of GREEN New Zealand kiwifruit is forecast to be similar or lower than last year. 2014 saw 285,000 cartons of GOLD exported to Australia and just over 1.35 million cartons of GREEN.

Tony Ponder, the chairperson of New Zealand’s Kiwifruit Product Group (KPG), the body representing kiwifruit exporters to Australia, says production from New Zealand continues to increase, in line with world-wide demand for New Zealand kiwifruit which has lifted significantly over the last three years. . .

NZ Marine Industry Training Organisation undergoes name change:

Reflecting the developing nature of the New Zealand marine industry, the New Zealand Marine Industry Training Organisation has changed its trading name to the New Zealand Marine and Composites Industry Training Organisation.

At the New Zealand Marine Industry Association AGM in March, members decided that a change in the industry training organisation’s name was the best way to reflect its diversified purpose, Since 2007, the ITO has trained skilled members not only for the marine sector, but the composites sector also. . .



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