Rural round-up

August 31, 2018

Commissioner releases research on the contribution of New Zealand’s livestock methane to global warming:

The Parliamentary Commissioner for the Environment, Simon Upton, has today released new research on the impact methane from New Zealand’s livestock has on global warming.

“I hope this new work will help promote debate on reducing methane emissions that is grounded firmly in science.” . .

Farmers face pressure under climate change legislation – Eric Frykberg:

Farmers’ hopes of getting an easy ride in climate change legislation has been dented by the combative stand on methane taken by Parliamentary Commissioner for the Environment.

The commissioner said to prevent global warming, methane emissions would have to fall by 10 to 22 percent below 2016 levels by 2050.

There would then need to be further reductions by 2100. . .

B+LNZ welcomes PCE report on livestock methane emissions:

Beef + Lamb New Zealand (B+LNZ) welcomes the Parliamentary Commissioner for the Environment’s report on livestock emissions which recognises the difference in the warming potential between short and long term greenhouse gases.

The Commissioner’s report says that if New Zealand wishes to ensure that methane from livestock contributes no additional warming beyond current levels, methane emissions from all livestock will need to be reduced from 2016 levels by between 10 – 22 per cent by 2050, and 20 – 27 per cent by 2100. . .

Methane report shoots down ‘must be zero’ claims:

Another research paper – this one from the Parliamentary Commissioner for the Environment – shoots down the claims that New Zealand must reduce its livestock methane emissions to zero, Federated Farmers climate change spokesperson Andrew Hoggard says.

The paper, based on modelling by Dr Andy Reisinger of the NZ Agricultural Greenhouse Gas Research Centre, suggests that to ensure no additional warming effects beyond current levels, methane emissions would need to be reduced by 10-22 percent below 2016 levels by 2050, with further reductions by 2100. . .

Snacking taken to a new high by Fonterra beverage – Peter Burke:

Fonterra is launching a milk beverage to tap into the emerging consumer trend called ‘snacking’.

The aim is to replace pies, crisps and sugar-filled soft drinks. Production is by new technology at a new plant in a deal with an apple juice processor. In a large industrial area near Hastings, Apollo Foods has set up a new processing plant, the brainchild of apple industry entrepreneur Ross Beaton who intends to make a quality, long life apple juice.

But the plant can do more than process apples: the technology is perfect for producing quality long life milk beverages, which Apollo has agreed to do for Fonterra. . .

Is agritech destined to save New Zealand?:

Agritech could be destined to save the New Zealand economy, leading New Zealand tech expert Graeme Muller says.

The tremendous worldwide demand for food continues to soar with some estimating the market to be worth $US3 trillion and much of the growth coming from specialty and healthy foods, Muller, the NZTech chief executive, says.

He is one of 30 New Zealand agritech delegates attending the Silicon Valley forum agritech immersion programme this week in San Jose, California, and they are finding that New Zealand is well placed to respond to the substantial changing demands. . .

Strong exports push King Salmon earnings – Pattrick Smellie:

(BusinessDesk) – Strong export growth in its lead North American market and in Asia pushed New Zealand King Salmon to record operating earnings in the year to June 30.

The result would have been stronger had the company not experienced high mortality among its salmon stocks because of high Marlborough Sounds water temperatures.

Earnings before interest, tax, depreciation and amortisation – the benchmark measure the company used for forecasts in its prospectus before listing on the NZX in 2016 – came in at $26.2 million, a 21 percent increase on the previous financial year and 17 percent ahead of prospectus forecasts. . .

 


Marlborough Sounds ‘paradise for fish farming’

December 13, 2013

Legal action over fish farming in the Marlborough Sounds is wasting millions a Scottish fish-farming expert who is advising New Zealand King Salmon and its opponents says.

His advice is to put conflict behind them and work together towards industry guidelines.

The Marlborough Sounds were a paradise for fish farming with no salmon pests and diseases, said Kenny Black on a visit to King Salmon farms in Queen Charlotte Sound and Tory Channel yesterday.

This week Professor Black will help the Marlborough District Council work out best practices for salmon farming and guidelines for monitoring, with input from the Ministry for Primary Industries, scientists monitoring farm compliance, the Sounds Advisory Group and Catriona Macleod, of the University of Tasmania.

Millions of dollars had been wasted as King Salmon applied for space to build new farms, Prof Black said. In a legal setting, parties were obliged to take a certain stand and avoid compromise.

Now they could take the more-mature approach of working together towards protocols that regulated the environment while being fair to all parties, he said.

The Scottish fish-farming industry had moved on from friction in the 1990s, since working together on a ministerial working group of all stakeholders. King Salmon’s Te Pangu and Clay Point farms in Tory Channel were “the way of the future with no big waves and a cracking current”, Prof Black said.

The company might offer to relinquish consents for less productive farms, in return for Tory Channel becoming a fin-fish farming area, he suggested. . .

Communication almost always leads to better outcomes than conflict and legal action.

Both parties need to set emotion and animosity aside and use a scientific approach.

That should allow some expansion of fish farming without degrading water quality.

 


Rural round-up

March 4, 2013

Commission updates Primary Production select committee on interest rate swaps investigation:

Commerce Commission Chairman Dr Mark Berry has today provided an update to the Primary Production select committee on the Commission’s progress in its interest rate swaps investigation.

In August 2012 the Commission began enquiring into whether interest rate swaps, a financial derivative product, were misleadingly marketed from 2005 onwards. The Commission has received 42 complaints since concerns were raised in the media.

“The investigation is at an early stage, but we are giving the issues full consideration. To date we have spent more than 1,000 staff hours on the investigation,” Dr Berry said.

The Commission is primarily considering whether the swaps were marketed in ways that may have misled customers as to their true risk, nature and suitability. . .

Minister welcomes King Salmon report:

The final report of the Board of Inquiry on New Zealand King Salmon’s application to develop new marine farms in the Marlborough Sounds was welcomed today by Minister of Conservation Dr Nick Smith.

“The Board has undertaken a thorough process being mindful of the need for New Zealand to conserve its natural resources with the need to grow exports, jobs and wealth,” Dr Smith says.

“The substantive decisions in the final report are consistent with the draft released last year, with the Board approving four new farms. These farms will occupy an area of just six hectares of surface water space out of a total of about 100,000 hectares in the Marlborough Sounds. They will enable King Salmon to grow its production from 7,500 to 15,000 tonnes per year, employ another 170 people and boost its annual export earnings by an extra $60m. . .

Good For Marlborough, Good For New Zealand:

The EPA Board of Inquiry’s (BOI) final determination will enable New Zealand King Salmon to deliver long-term benefits to the region, the community and the national economy.

Aquaculture New Zealand Chairman Peter Vitasovich said the four new salmon farms approved in the decision would create permanent full-time jobs and provide significant downstream benefits for associated industries while generating export earnings through the sustainable production of premium seafood.

“Four new working salmon farms in the Marlborough Sounds will provide valuable employment opportunities within the community, while also attracting skilled labour to the region, to work across the spectrum of production – from farming to processing to marketing and business roles,” Mr Vitasovich said. . .

Final decision on King Salmon released by EPA

The EPA’s Board of Inquiry has issued its final decision on the King Salmon applications today, approving four out of nine salmon farms in the Marlborough Sounds.

“An earlier draft decision announced that 5 of the 9 nine sites would be refused consent and approvals given for 4 sites. This final decision doesn’t change anything in that respect,” said EDS Chairman Gary Taylor.

“We acknowledge that the Board has declined consent for 5 sites but it has not gone far enough.

“The areas the industrial scale consented farms are to be located in are highly natural and in prominent locations in the iconic and internationally renowned Marlborough Sounds. . .

Fonterra And A-Ware Food Group Confirm European Partnership:

New Zealand-based Fonterra and Netherlands-based A-ware Food Group have given the green light to develop a new cheese plant and dairy ingredients plant in Heerenveen in the north of the Netherlands.

Fonterra CEO Theo Spierings and A-ware Food Group CEO Jan Anker have today confirmed the partnership would proceed and signed a final agreement.

Under the agreement a greenfields site will be developed where A-ware will operate a cheese plant and Fonterra will operate a dairy ingredients plant alongside it. Cheese will be produced for A-ware’s customers in Europe and the whey and lactose produced will be processed into premium nutrition dairy ingredients for Fonterra’s global customer base. . .

Wools Of New Zealand Closes Capital Raise:

Wools of New Zealand has closed its capital raise with more than 700 applications for shares totalling approximately $6 million, representing approximately 14.5 million kilograms of annual strong wool production and a five-year marketing commitment.

As a 100% grower owned company, Wools of New Zealand is now positioned to drive its commercial, market-pull strategy, for the benefit of its shareholders.

Mark Shadbolt, chairman of Wools of New Zealand, said there had been a lot of late interest right up to the close of the offer. . .


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