Rural round-up

May 25, 2016

Shareholders unhappy with NZ’s biggest meat company split – Julia Lee:

If New Zealand dairy is our nation’s economic life-blood, then New Zealand meat is our muscle.

At $7 billion a year it’s our second-biggest export earner.

Seven-thousand New Zealanders work for the country’s biggest meat player Silver Fern and 16,000 more have shares in the company.

A company part-owned by the Chinese government are on the verge of signing a deal to split its ownership in half with Shanghai Maling. . . 

Longtime farming families honoured – Samuel White:

More than 200 people from all over the country congregated in Lawrence on Saturday to honour the 33 families receiving a Century Farm and Station Award this year.

The New Zealand Century Farm and Station Awards honour and recognise New Zealand families who have continuously farmed the same land for more than a century.

The awards ceremony was held at the Simpson Park Recreation Centre in Lawrence on Saturday night. . . 

Excellence awards for Armidale:

The Paterson family, of Gimmerburn, have won the Clip of the Year title at the Otago Merino Association’s merino excellence awards.

Simon and Sarah, and Allan and Eris Paterson received the award at a function in Queenstown on Friday night, after winning the stud flock category.

Their Armidale merino stud, which has enjoyed considerable success over the years, was founded by Allan Paterson’s grandfather George. . .

Announcement from MPI’s Director-General in relation to independent review – Martyn Dunne:

On 19 May I initiated an independent review into circumstances surrounding specific MPI compliance operations. I have now approved the Terms of Reference which will inform this review, and am making these available to the public.

The credibility of MPI is of utmost importance to its ability to successfully discharge its role as the regulator of fisheries in New Zealand. Each year MPI prosecutes in excess of 300 cases in the fisheries sector and issues more than 3,000 infringements. . . 

Conservation group’s claims slammed:

A campaign launched by a Northern Hemisphere conservation group targeting the New Zealand fishing industry is based on inaccurate allegations, Seafood New Zealand Chief Executive Tim Pankhurst says.

Nabu International is calling on fast food chain McDonald’s to drop New Zealand fish to “save Maui dolphins”.

“McDonald’s use New Zealand hoki. Maui dolphins are not found in the deepwater where hoki are caught, Mr Pankhurst says. . . 

New international cooperation on animal diseases:

The Government has signed three new agreements to work closely with and support other countries in the event of animal disease outbreaks, Primary Industries Minister Nathan Guy has announced today.

“As a Government we are working extremely hard to protect our borders and the primary sector from natural threats. An important part of that is international cooperation in case there is a major incident,” says Mr Guy.

The agreements formalise the participating countries’ commitment to support each other in the event of animal health emergencies, including the sharing of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) vaccine in an outbreak and recognition of zoning principles for foreign animal disease outbreaks. . . 

Faster rollout of fisheries monitoring:

Primary Industries Minister Nathan Guy has today signalled the Government’s intention to speed up the rollout of monitoring equipment on commercial fishing vessels.

“Work is already underway on installing electronic monitoring and cameras on all commercial fishing vessels, however today I’ve signalled to my officials that this work should be fast-tracked,” says Mr Guy.

“This increased monitoring will provide greater transparency of the commercial fleet’s activities and improve public confidence that our fisheries are being well managed. . .

New Zealand poultry industry – new strategies needed to catch next wave of growth:

Strong growth in both volume and value terms is possible for New Zealand’s chicken meat industry, but it needs to focus on alternative strategies to capture new opportunities, according to a new report by agribusiness specialist Rabobank.

In the report, Catching the next wave of growth, Rabobank identifies the development of new markets, the capturing of a greater share of consumer spending and improved margins through productivity gains as three key strategies that will enable the industry to maximise volume and value growth. . . 

Latest Overseer Update Reduces Workload For Users:

OVERSEER Limited released today the latest update to OVERSEER® Nutrient Budgets (or OVERSEER). The new version OVERSEER 6.2.2 reduces the amount of manual data users need to input into the tool.

OVERSEER 6.2.2 lets users access soils data directly from Landcare Research’s S-map database. OVERSEER uses the S-map database to seamlessly provide online data on soil properties affecting farm nutrient leaching. State of the art technologies link the two systems.

“This new OVERSEER version is great news for users, reducing the manual input of up to 18 soil data fields. For the first time, OVERSEER has connected with other software to provide auto-population of data. Our users have been asking for this capability. The new version is an exciting step forward for OVERSEER,” Dr Caroline Read, OVERSEER Limited General Manager says. . . 


Rural round-up

April 13, 2016

Plan for the worst, hope for the best – Jackie Harrigan:

If you could bottle optimism and cheerfulness and spray it around, Ben and Belinda Price would be a great source.

The Taranaki Dairy Industry Awards Share Farmers of the Year for 2016 could be forgiven for feeling a little down, with their feed wedge flatlining on their Waitotara sharemilking farm after a hot dry summer and the Fonterra payout forecast dipping to new lows.

But the indomitable pair have picked up many skills in their eight years of sharemilking and they put optimism and healthy thinking at the top of their list of useful habits, followed closely by budget monitoring and giving back. . .

Three years of low payouts for dairy farmers will build pressure – Jill Galloway:

Farmers are dealing with tough times.

Rabobank Feilding branch manager Asti Williamson said 99 per cent of dairy farmers were likely to survive the three-year milk payout downturn.

“Each case is different. It depends how much debt a farm has.  But we are supporting our farmers.”

He said bank economists thought New Zealand was about halfway through the payout downturn.

“And the impact of the low payout is on the banks, farmers and the whole country.” . . 

 

The hunt for the golden kiwifruit – Julian Lee:

Scientists in Te Puke are concocting bizarre and wonderful new types of kiwifruit.

The kiwifruit industry will bring in $1 billion next year, and scientists are on the hunt for the next golden kiwifruit.

The SunGold kiwifruit was developed in New Zealand in the 1990s but has its origins in China. It’s now a popular variety, both domestically and for export.

Zespri and Plant and Land Research are looking to replicate that success. . . .

NZ lamb angers British farmers after imports sold under Prince Charles’ label :

British farmers are dismayed to find New Zealand lamb being sold under Prince Charles’ brand Duchy Originals, which was meant to promote the best of British produce.

Duchy Originals products are sold only at UK supermarket Waitrose, which confirmed it does sell imported lamb under the Duchy brand when supplies from British farms were not available, the Daily Mail reported.

Welsh sheep farmer Gethin Havard said New Zealand lamb was ‘over-fat and over-priced’ compared with Welsh lamb. . . 

Fonterra board size in focus in first governance overhaul since inception –  Jonathan Underhill:

(BusinessDesk) – Fonterra’s board and shareholders’ council successfully opposed a remit to shrink its board at last year’s annual meeting and the outcome of this week’s first-ever governance overhaul may hold that line while proposing other changes to ensure the best spread of boardroom skills.

New Zealand’s biggest exporter is scheduled to release a set of proposals to refresh its governance structures – both at board and shareholders’ council level – on Thursday, with the aim of putting any proposed changes to its structure before shareholders for a vote in May. Auckland-based Fonterra hasn’t changed its governance and representation arrangements since being set up 15 years ago although it undertook a full review in 2013. . .

NZ Wine Industry Embraces Automation –WineWorks and Sacred Hill lead the way with supply chain integration:

WineWorks, Sacred Hill, and Flow Software have taken a significant step towards integrating the New Zealand wine industry supply chain.

The organisations have just gone live with a new automated process that allows efficient management of the wine to bottling, warehousing, and distribution of Sacred Hill wine via WineWorks.

“We identified that if we could send our sales orders via EDI to WineWorks this would reduce administration processing costs, negate duplicate rekeying of orders, remove error input rates, eliminate stock from being allocated if not available and allow for more orders to be sent to WineWorks. ” says Cameron Sutton, Production Manager of Sacred Hill. “Flow worked closely with our specialist ERP provider UXC Eclipse, which was fundamental to the success of the project”, notes Sutton. . .


Rural round-up

February 17, 2016

Urban ideals quash rural spirit – Craig Wiggins:

Over the last few years I have stood in front of many, commentating rural sports in many rural communities in three different countries and feel it’s time to put some perspective into the emotive protests for and against rural activities.  

We have just witnessed the SAFE campaign against the dairy industry and through the summer the anti-rodeo campaign gaining media coverage.  As in the case of the SAFE coverage, it’s easy fodder for urban-based journalists to get consumer buy-in and notoriety for their own careers.  

I pat on the back anyone who is passionate about what they believe in or against and stand up for it.

I am, however, against sensationalising facts and issues in the pursuit of self-promotion and a win over others at all costs, whether it be the truth or not.  

To win an argument one should be more knowledgeable about the facts the opposing side is arguing than they are. . . 

Landcorp scraps Shanghai Pengxin deal – Neal Wallace:

Landcorp will not renew its sharemilking contract with Chinese corporate dairy farmers Shanghai Pengxin when it expires at the end of next season.  

This brings to an end an arrangement that started in November 2012 when Shanghai Pengxin bought 16 Central North Island dairy farms that belonged to the Crafar family. . . 

Alliance enforces shareholding commitment to match supply – Allan Barber:

After many years competing for livestock without compelling suppliers to invest in the full number of shares required in principle, Alliance Group has seized the opportunity offered by Silver Fern Farms’ likely shareholding change to review its capital base.

The uncharitable observer would presume this action is necessary to raise more capital for balance sheet or investment purposes. However Alliance chairman Murray Taggart is adamant this move is all about correcting the imbalance between those suppliers who are fully shared up and those who have made a lesser commitment. The adjustment will take place gradually in line with the rate of supply with deductions of 50 cents per lamb, sheep or calf, $2 per deer and $6 per head of cattle. . . 

Has our dairy industry gone too far? – Julian Lee:

We all know the importance of our dairy industry and its existence to our country.

It’s our number one industry — we get that.

But has dairy gone too far in the beautiful Mackenzie Country?

The Mackenzie Basin is a stunning piece of landscape in the South Island — a desert spotted with electric blue lakes surrounded by mountains.

It is the last place you would think you would want to put cows. . . 

Open Country Dairy posts record annual profit in 2015 – Tina Morrison:

(BusinessDesk) – Open Country Dairy, the dairy manufacturer controlled by Talley’s Group, posted a record annual profit last year even as revenue fell.

Profit increased 16 percent to $34.4 million in the year ended Sept. 30, 2015, according to the Auckland-based company’s annual report. Revenue slid 24 percent to $688 million while the cost of sales sank 28 percent to $620.5 million, according to the accounts.

The company didn’t pay a dividend and has previously said it was investing in infrastructure for future growth. . . 

Weaknesses in industry cohesion and international marketing are costing kiwi farmers:

Federated Farmers Meat and Fibre Chair Rick Powdrell is calling for action to be taken to address issues in the marketing of kiwi lamb overseas – particularly in the UK – to prevent our sheep farmers continuing to face low returns.

Speaking at Federated Farmers Meat & Fibre Council in Wellington today, Mr Powdrell said meals featuring lamb had fallen 7% in the UK, while lamb consumption in the US was rising at 10% per year.

Mr Powdrell has just returned from the American Sheep Industry Conference in Scottsdale, Arizona, where he had seen first-hand some of the initiatives that are underpinning this growth. . . 


Free to vote, free to not

September 23, 2014

The angst over low voter turnout has resulted in the inevitable suggestion of compulsion:

A political scientist says compulsory voting would be the easiest way to lift declining number of people voting.

About a million people did not vote in Saturday’s election.

The Electoral Commission estimates voter turnout was 77 percent of those enrolled, which is up from 74 percent in 2011. . .

Julian Lee counters that by explaining why he doesn’t vote:

Until today I’ve always tried to keep my filthy non-voting habits to myself. . .

You could enter a polling booth on election day stark drunk, barely able to stand, unable to think or concentrate, mindlessly tick the ballot paper and you would earn more respect from the voting public than if you had soberly and sincerely made the conscious decision not to vote.

I have given this decision hours and hours of thought. I’ve read all the parties’ policies. I have weighed and speculated and considered every possible option.

And my conclusion? I choose not to participate in the game.

But I’ve finally decided to publicly own up because I think it is bizarre I should feel ashamed of a political opinion in what most people would consider a free and tolerant society. . .

He goes on to discuss his reasons which includes thinking it won’t make a difference because bureaucrats rather than politicians control everything.

I disagree with his reason but agree with his conclusion:

. . .  And surely, every else taken into consideration, I have the right to choose not to choose?

If we are free to vote we should also be free to not vote.

Better a lower number of people voting freely for whatever reason motivates them than a larger number voting because they are compelled to.

 


Rural round-up

November 24, 2013

Demand grows for halal meat exports – Julian Lee:

Halal meat is becoming one of New Zealand’s major exports, with the billion-dollar industry now feeding 75 countries.

But as production expands, questions are being raised about whether all New Zealand meat should become halal.

Today was the first-ever meeting in New Zealand of the Muslim World Forum, a growing global organisation which looks after Muslim interests worldwide.

But the meeting was dominated by talk about a silently booming industry. . .

Chinese ‘still wary of formula from NZ’ – Nigel Stirling:

Chinese parents scared by reports of potentially fatal contamination of infant formula from New Zealand didn’t get the later memo telling them it was safe, a Chinese formula company owner says.

Suguo Wu, the owner of NZ Goldmax Health, was in Dunedin earlier this month for a global food-safety conference and said the future of infant formula sales from NZ to China hinged on restoring its reputation quickly.

Wu said the initial reporting of Fonterra’s botulism scare cost his company dearly as consumers deserted NZ-sourced brands.

Official reassurances from Fonterra and the NZ Government were not reported as widely in China and consumers remained wary, he said. . . .

Quad bike roll bars debated on both sides of Tasman:

Quad bikes are a major killer on farms on both sides of the Tasman, and farm safety experts in both Australia and New Zealand are debating the need for roll bars to be fitted to all vehicles.

Earlier this month a New Zealand coroner Brant Shortland found five quad deaths could have been prevented if bikes had roll bars.

“I still think it’s an individual decision, my view is I think there is enough information that suggests that roll over bars will save life more than others,” he told the ABC.

New South Wales University’s Professor Raphael Grzebieta has done extensive research to inform people about the limitations of these types of vehicles. . .

Call to retrain quad trainers – Richard Rennie:

Retraining the trainers of quad-bike riders has been offered as a means to reduce death and injury to farmers on the machines.

Tauranga-based driving instructor John James was asked to address the coronial inquest into five quad bike deaths this year (Farmers Weekly, November 18).

“The coroner Brandt Shortland contacted me and asked me to present to his inquest after I had taken him for a ride on a quad,” James said. . .

Chris Hay wins young auctioneer title – Abby Brown:

Chris Hay has beaten out eight auctioneers to win the Young Auctioneer title.

Hay won the second annual Heartland Bank Young Auctioneers Competition held at the Canterbury A&P Show.

The New Zealand Farmers Livestock representative for Wanganui and Waverly put his 14 months of auctioneering experience to use in the mock auction, where he had to sell two live beasts on November 15. . .

UN International Year of Family Farming 2014 successfuly launched in New Zealand:

Representatives from around 40 family farming organisations and their associates gathered at Parliament today for a day-long Inaugural Forum to launch the UN International Year of Family Farming 2014. (The official UN launch at UN headquarters in New York was also on November 22.) . .


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