Rural round-up

22/03/2018

NZ led study reveals DNA of cattle and sheep bacteria – Eric Frykberg:

International scientists led by New Zealanders have identified the genetic makeup of over 500 species of bacteria found in the gut of cattle and sheep.

Previously the genomes of just 15 rumen microbial genomes were available to the scientific community.

The project was led by the former AgResearch scientist Bill Kelly and a current AgResearch scientist Sinead Leahy.

They were joined by nearly 60 scientists from 14 research organisations across nine countries. . . 

Organic dairy dreams backed by science – Fritha Tagg:

Fritha Tagg meets an organic dairy farmer who has the science to make his dreams come true.

Ged Goode is not shy when it comes to improving his herd. “We want to produce the tastiest, healthiest milk in the world,” he says with a big grin.

Dreams don’t get much bigger but this organic dairy farmer who has farmed south of Tokoroa for 26 years has the track record to back it up and the determination to keep forging ahead. His 800ha (500ha effective, the rest is native bush and forestry) farm is home to 680 organic milk-producing cows.

Now he is embracing A2 milk production and establishing a polled herd. . .

Wetlands hold secret ingredient of future water quality – Aslan Wright-Stow, Tom Stephens, David Burger, DairyNZ, Kit Rutherford, Chris Tanner, NIWA:

Wetlands are the kidneys of the land – filtering, absorbing and transforming contaminants before they can affect streams or lakes. DairyNZ’s water science team and NIWA experts share how wetlands benefit water quality.

A NIWA review of research into seepage wetlands in New Zealand over the past two decades showed wetlands are remarkably effective at stripping nitrate, a problematic form of nitrogen, through a process known as denitrification.

The review offers robust evidence into ‘how’ seepage wetlands benefit water quality. DairyNZ commissioned the NIWA work because it firmly believes that seepage wetlands offer a unique opportunity to reduce nitrogen loss and should be prioritised for stock exclusion and protected against further drainage. The independent research commissioned certainly supports those claims. . . 

Federated Farmers pays tribute to John O’ Connor:

Federated Farmers offers its deepest condolences to Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor and family after the passing of his father, West Coast dairy farmer John O’Connor.

Mr O’ Connor ONZM was a passionate advocate for the dairy industry and was regarded as a pioneer for introducing dairy to the Buller district on the West Coast.

He was a Nuffield Scholar, Federated Farmers National Dairy Chair, West Coast Provincial President and served for 48 years as a director on the Buller Valley, Karamea and Westland Dairy Companies. . .

Rabobank New Zealand announces new board appointment:

Rabobank New Zealand has announced the appointment of Jillian Segal AM to its board of directors.

Ms Segal, a respected Australian company director with extensive regulatory and legal experience, joins the boards of Rabobank New Zealand Limited, as well as Rabobank Australia & New Zealand Group’s other major operating entities – Rabobank Australia Limited and Rabo Australia Limited.

Announcing the appointment, Rabobank’s Australia & New Zealand chairman Sir Henry van der Heyden said Ms Segal’s extensive board experience across the private and public sectors, including in financial services – coupled with a career-long background in governance and law – made her an “ideal fit” for Rabobank’s New Zealand and Australian boards. . . 

Mammoth kiwifruit property portfolio placed on the market for sale:

One of New Zealand’s biggest privately-owned kiwifruit orchard portfolios has been placed on the market for sale.

The portfolio consists of three separate mid to large-sized productive blocks at Te Puke in the Bay of Plenty – the centre of New Zealand’s highly lucrative kiwifruit-growing industry.

Combined, the three blocks comprise some 98 canopy hectares – on track to produce between 1.2 million – 1.3 million trays once all in mature production, and with the potential to increase production even further. . . 

An easing in the late summer market:

Data released today by the Real Estate Institute of NZ (REINZ) shows there were 52 fewer farm sales (-11.9%) for the three months ended February 2018 than for the three months ended February 2017.

Overall, there were 384 farm sales in the three months ended February 2018, compared to 396 farm sales for the three months ended January 2018 (-3.0%), and 436 farm sales for the three months ended February 2017.1,524 farms were sold in the year to February 2018, 13.5% fewer than were sold in the year to February 2017, with 20.3% more finishing farms, 19.0% more dairy farms and 32.4% fewer grazing and 36.2% fewer arable farms sold over the same period.

The median price per hectare for all farms sold in the three months to February 2018 was $27,523 compared to $27,395 recorded for three months ended February 2017 (+0.5%). The median price per hectare fell 2.6% compared to January. . . 


Rural round-up

04/06/2014

Top bull’s legacy will continue to benefit NZ dairy industry for years:

A decade’s worth of outstanding dairy progeny remains the legacy of CRV Ambreed’s top bull Okura Manhatten who passed away in May.

Manhatten’s stud owners Bruce and Ngaire Cutforth of Okura Stud in Northland were compelled to put 14 year old Manhatten down 18 months after he returned to the stud, having delivered a decade’s service on CRV Ambreed’s Jersey sire team. . . .

Other side of the water issue – Chris Lewis:

Watching Campbell Live last week, I was disappointed to see more selective reporting on a water quality issue.

The reporter, Tristram Clayton, did a series of stories on Lake Waikare, which glossed over some important details – allowing viewers to jump to the easy assumption that, once again, another water source is under threat from the primary industries alone.

Before anyone jumps up and down saying I am an ignorant farmer not taking responsibility for our industry’s contribution, this is not what I am saying at all. . .

1080 video raises ire – Rachel Thomas:

A Waikato regional councillor has been called in to his bosses’ office to explain himself over a YouTube video he posted that criticises his own council’s 1080 poison scheme.

Thames-Coromandel councillor Clyde Graf filmed farmer Chris Barker, who had two cattle from his herd die after a 1080 drop near his King Country farm.

In the video, Barker said the Waikato Regional Council had been “dictatorial” in the past about dropping the poison. . . .

Two new members join HortNZ board:

Two new members have been elected to the board of Horticulture New Zealand (HortNZ).

They are Tony Howey, a vegetable and berryfruit grower from South Canterbury, and Leon Stallard, an apple grower from Hawke’s Bay.

HortNZ president Julian Raine from Nelson was re-elected for a second term. . .

Supporting the next generation:

Beef + Lamb New Zealand supports a new crop of young New Zealanders interested in agriculture through its annual undergraduate scholarship programme.

Over the past 11 years more than 50 young people have completed their studies at Lincoln and Massey universities and Taratahi and Telford thanks to the programme.

Applicants do not have to be from a farm but they need to be talented, motivated, and passionate about the sheep-and-beef industry. . . .

Entries open today for the 2014 NZ Food Awards:

The NZ Food Awards have been a highlight of the food industry’s calendar since 1987, recognising innovation in New Zealand’s largest export sector. Massey University’s stewardship of the awards since 1998 has seen them grow from strength to strength, recognising wider aspects of the business, including food safety, research and development, creativity and business success. . .

Leading New Zealand wine brand celebrates a new beginning:

Matariki, one of New Zealand’s most prestigious wine brands has formally announced its return to market with the launch of its ultra-premium 2009 wines.

Now under the ownership of Taurus Wine Group Limited, the wines remain under the stewardship of John O’Connor and the watchful eye of the mother and her six daughters that form the visible stars in the Matariki constellation, appropriately re-appearing in the night sky on June 28 heralding the Maori New Year. . . .


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