Rural round-up

October 16, 2015

SFF votes yes on China deal – Dene Mackenzie:

Silver Fern Farms shareholders have voted overwhelmingly in favour of selling a 50% stake in their company to Chinese-owned Shanghai Maling.

The outcome has just been announced following a special meeting at Forsyth Barr Stadium in Dunedin.

The vote was 82% in favour of the deal.

It means Shanghai Maling, an offshoot of state-owned food giant Bright Food Group, will inject $261 million into Silver Fern Farms, with the expectation it will be debt-free, with money in the bank, by this time next year. . . 

Robotic cutters go into boning rooms – Sally Rae:

Alliance Group is spending $15million in robotic technology destined for the boning rooms of its Smithfield and Pukeuri plants.

The major benefit of the custom built primal/middle cutting machinery from Dunedin company Scott Technology was higher product yields with additional productivity and safety benefits.

While the technology meant each boning room would require slightly fewer people, ”natural attrition” meant no redundancies would be made, Alliance Group chief executive David Surveyor said. . . 

Dynamic businesses up for Enterprising Awards:

Dynamic businesses competing for Enterprising Rural Women Awards 2015

Eleven dynamic and innovative businesses are in the running for the Rural Women New Zealand Enterprising Rural Women Awards 2015.

“This is the seventh year we’ve held the Enterprising Rural Women Awards,” says Rural Women National President, Wendy McGowan. “We’re starting to see an emerging trend of dynamic rural businesses being run by women to meet the needs of the rural community but with wider appeal to urban residents and tourists.”

“We’re excited to see that the gradual rollout of broadband into rural communities is increasing business opportunities for rural enterprises to thrive online, even when operating from remote locations. . . 

Determination keeps the worms and eczema at bay – Kate Taylor:

Hawke’s Bay perendale breeders Graeme and Sue Maxwell believe in being proactive about improving their flock, particularly with testing and selection for worm tolerance and facial eczema tolerance.

“We are proactive and do these things so our clients get the benefits from us doing the work first,” says Graeme.

“The health of our sheep has gone through the roof since we started doing the faecal egg counts. It turned our commercial flock around,” adds Sue. . . 

Inside JJ Leahy’s pastoral empire – Peter Austin:

MEN who make a living – and in some cases, a fortune – dealing in pastoral land and livestock are by nature inclined to be reticent, shunning publicity and keeping their trade secrets to themselves.

That’s why a newly published book on the life and times of 20th Century mega-dealer John Jeremiah (“J.J.”) Leahy is likely to generate much interest – because it’s written by somebody “inside the tent”.

Gerard Leahy, the youngest (though now well into his 80s) and the sole survivor of J.J. Leahy’s seven children, has just completed a 10-year project of writing the story of his father’s eventful life. . . 


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