Rural round-up

02/02/2014

Farmers fear restraints despite cleaner lakes – Richard Rennie:

With testing revealing Lake Rotoiti’s water quality is the best in decades, farmers in the Rotorua region are questioning further tightening of nutrient rules on farms in the catchment.

Recent water quality surveys by Bay of Plenty Regional Council indicates the Ohau diversion wall and upgraded sewerage systems have delivered improved fish-spawning conditions and improved water clarity in the lake.

The Ohau diversion wall, completed in 2008, has been successful in diverting the nutrient-rich water of Lake Rotorua from Lake Rotoiti, to be flushed down Kaituna River. . .

Save the working dog – Jillaroo Jess:

I just read the most distressing news. Once again, a bureaucrat in an office somewhere has decided to make like even more difficult for farmers than it already is. It is concerning the keeping of working dogs in Victoria, Australia. I am not from Victoria, but all Australians deserve a fair go, and often other states follow suit with these sorts of things.

Basically, if you have 3 intact females on your property you are now a breeder and will have to follow strict regulations on the keeping of your dogs. Farmers generally do not neuter their animals as it can affect their working ability, and really, if you have a good dog – you’ll want another one day! . . .

Reworking our dairy systems – Keith Woodford:

Many farmers will resist it fiercely, housing our dairy herd in sheds is almost inevitable.

The New Zealand dairy industry has always prided itself as being different. Whereas most other countries developed their dairy industries based on the housing of cows for much or all of the year, the New Zealand industry has always been pasture-based. The cows harvest the grass themselves, the cost of production has been low, and the image was of “clean and green”.

Alas, we now know the image of “clean and green” was never quite true. Although a huge amount has been done to clean up the industry, with fencing of waterways, nutrient budgets and meticulous management of effluent from the milking shed, there is a fundamental problem still to be tackled. This fundamental problem is the concentration of nitrogen in the urine patches which grazing cows leave behind. . .

Debate on increased indoor dairy farming in NZ heats up:

Some farmers worry what increased indoor dairy farming in New Zealand would do to the country’s clean green image.

Tom Phillips (@OneFarmNZ) was worried that indoor farming would remove the country’s point of difference of being clean and green.

“NZ has comparative advantage with pasture based dairy not purchased feed or housing,” he tweeted.

Anne Galloway (@annegalloway) was also worried that it would create animal welfare issues.

She did not think the review of the dairy cattle welfare bill, to ensure indoor cows in NZ have regulations in place, would be enough.

She tweeted that indoor farming would create a new issue that doesn’t exist now and that the public will weigh in on – positively and negatively. . .

Recognising research excellence:

The Lincoln University Research Committee has announced the recipients of the 2013 Excellence in Early Career Research Awards.  Three academic staff members have been named: Dr William Godsoe, Dr Sharon Forbes and Dr Majeed Safa .

The awards recognise research excellence among academic staff who have less than five years of research experience since completing their PhD, with winners being selected on criteria such as the quality and originality of their research; peer recognition via publications and speaking invitations; success with external funding; and awards from other learned bodies.

As well as the formal recognition of their achievements, all recipients receive $5,000 to be applied to a project of their choosing. . .

‘Uncertainty’ over wheat use by UK ethanol plants – Agrimoney:

The UK’s stop-start bioethanol industry was rated as a “large uncertainty” for wheat demand, after officials cut their forecast for consumption of the grain by biofuel plants, amid complaints of unfair imports of US supplies. 

The UK farm ministry, Defra, cut by 307,000 tonnes to 7.50m tonnes its forecast for industrial and food use of wheat in 2013-14, despite higher ideas of the use of the grain by the important distilling industry.  The downgrade reflected in part lower use in flour production, thanks to a better quality UK harvest this year, but also to a drop in use for bioethanol production, which “continues to be a large uncertainty for demand”, the HGCA crop bureau said. . .


Rural round-up

08/12/2013

Another 385ha to be irrigated by scheme – David Bruce:

The North Otago Irrigation Company is expanding again, and will next week add another 385ha to a scheme that started with a 10,000ha first stage.

That initial investment of $67 million commissioned in 2006 to ultimately bring irrigation to 26,000ha on the North Otago Downlands, Waiareka Valley and eventually the Kakanui Valley has now grown to an asset of $75 million.

The new expansion, worth $3.5 million, has been financed by a combination of shareholder equity and company borrowings. . . .

Perfect country for sheep, paradise for rabbits too… – Timothy Brown:

The story of Earnscleugh Station was told at a field day at the property last month. Reporter Timothy Brown went along to hear how a rabbit-plagued desert was transformed into an award-winning showcase of farm management.

Earnscleugh Station stretches across 21,000ha of rugged Central Otago landscape. 

The station rises from 170m above sea level to 1850m, and has bitterly cold winters and hot dry summers – perfect sheep country.

Unfortunately for the Campbells – the owners of the station – it is also perfect rabbit country. . .

Fruit research aims for yield boost – Yvonne OHara:

A new research programme for pipfruit, kiwifruit and summer fruit is expected to see potential yield increases of between 50% and 150% by 2025.

Plant and Food Research (PFR) was given $8.3 million over six years by the Government, along with a 20% industry buy-in, in August, to redesign orchards from the ground up.

PFR business manager Declan Graham said the programme, Future Orchard Planting Systems (FOPS), was designed to increase the productivity and efficiency of the industry and that included expanding the kiwifruit and pipfruit sectors to $4 billion, up from the present $1.5 billion, by 2025. . .

Lack of pasture persistence a recurring theme:

IN THE 2007/08 drought Wayne Reynolds’ cows chewed covers down to four clicks and average cover across his 154ha effective farm was just 1190kgDM/ha.

Production that season dropped from 1200kgMS/ha to 1000kgMS/ha and despite immediately reseeding nearly half the farm, and a quarter of the farm annually after that, it didn’t recover.

“Milksolids were static despite our best efforts, bringing feed in and renewing the pasture of the farm,” he told the New Zealand Grassland Association’s conference in Tauranga earlier this month. . .

Attempt at shearing record:

WAIKARETU SHEARING record-holding husband and wife Sam and Emily Welch are rewarding the loyalty of their workers by helping them also get their names into the books with a five-stand lamb shearing record near Auckland this month.

The two and shearing contracting partner Tony Clayton-Greene are organising The Cavalier Woolscourers Ltd eight-hour, five-stand World Lamb Shearing Record attempt for the unclaimed eight-hour tally record at Cashmore Farms in Kawakawa Bay, between Clevedon and the Firth of Thames, on December 10. This is the closest to Auckland an event like this has ever been held. . .

Foaly Moley! – Jillaroo Jess:

This year, we only have had 3 Australian Stock Horse foals born on the property. It’s definitely quality over quantity though, they are beautiful. First born was a flashy chestnut colt with a big baldy face (lots of white) and 3 white socks who we named Coolrdige Kidman – after a famous Australian cattle baron. Next, a lovely little bay filly with a bucket load of attitude named Coolridge Karijini – a beautiful desert in Western Australia. Finally, a leggy black filly called Coolridge Khaleesi – I’m a big fan of Game of Thrones!

In case anyone is interested in Australian Stock Horses, and follows their breeding, all three are by Kooloombah Confidence, a very handsome red dun stallion. Confidence, and all of the mares are bred to Campdraft, which is an Australian horse sport with cattle, where you must first cut out a beast in the ‘camp’, then take it out into the arena and bend it around two posts and through a gate. These foals all have great breeding and we are looking forward to seeing their natural ability under saddle. I’m currently in the process of building a website for our horses and will have it finished in the coming months. Once breeding season is over I’ll have more time to get things happening. . .

Thousands attend official opening of world’s largest drier:

Thousands of Cantabrians joined Fonterra today to celebrate the official opening of the world’s largest milk powder drier at the Co-operative’s Darfield site.

The milk powder drier, which has already produced more than 50,000 metric tonnes of whole milk powder since it kicked into gear, was officially opened by Selwyn Member of Parliament and Minister for the Environment, Amy Adams as part of a public open day.

Fonterra’s Director of New Zealand Operations, Robert Spurway, said the completion of Darfield’s second stage was great for the local community and means that Fonterra can make the most of the Co-operative’s milk produced in the South Island. . .


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