Rural round-up

March 9, 2017

The big deluge: Fresh weather warnings as slips affect Coromandel homes, close roads, power off:

Fresh dire weather warnings have been issued as slips force people out of Coromandel properties and roads remain closed across sodden parts of the North Island.

As water recedes and slips are cleared off roads from yesterday’s massive one-in-a-100-year deluge, Northland is being told to be on watch for potentially damaging thunderstorms to hit mainly south of Kaitaia as the region comes in for a period of torrential rain. . .

Lange, manager get access awards – Guy Williams:

The men responsible for opening up public access to high country land between Arrowtown and Glendhu Bay have been recognised by the Walking Access Commission.

Switzerland-based record producer Robert ”Mutt” Lange and his Arrowtown-based manager, Russell Hamilton, received Walking Access Champion awards at a ceremony at Parliament on Tuesday.

Mr Hamilton, who accepted the famously publicity-shy Mr Lange’s award on his behalf, said it was ”very nice” to be recognised..

How I beat the black dog within myself –  Jon Morgan:

The latest person to come out and admit they have had problems with depression is a young Methven farmer, Sam Robinson.

Writing on NZ Farming’s Facebook page, he spoke movingly about how bleak it can be to feel so down that you want to kill yourself.

He acknowledged that it is difficult for those who have no experience of mental illness to recognise the signs and be supportive.

He had one suggestion for what they could do – just to say to their mate next time they are in a social situation something like, “I think you are a good sort and I bloody like you“. . .

Cattle lost in fire: it’s horrible out there, the things I saw – Michael Pearce:

Larry Konrade of Ashland likes hunting everything from doves to huge whitetail bucks.

But when he left his house Tuesday morning with a favored rifle, he was dreading the day. He felt even worse when it was over.

“It’s horrible, just horrible. I left the house with (60) shells and used them all,” Konrade said. He said he probably killed 40 cows, “and in a lot of places there weren’t even very many left alive to put down.” . .

Nuffield scholars identify challenges for NZ – Richard Rennie:

Last year’s Nuffield Scholars are uneasy at competing countries’ ability to match or outpace New Zealand agriculture.

In a summary of their experiences the unbalanced rhetoric around emerging technologies was also noted.

Wellington based government agricultural development manager Jessica Bensemann reported her concern over New Zealand agriculture’s level of disconnectedness from global trading trends and patterns after visiting Asia, United States, Europe and the Middle East.

Instead she warned New Zealand’s primary sector appeared to be transfixed within the farm gate. . .

Rugged rural fellas wanted:

The call has gone out for young, gallant rural gents to compete for this year’s New Zealand Agricultural Fieldays’ Rural Bachelor of the Year.

Eight finalists will be selected for the popular competition, which takes place during Fieldays at Mystery Creek Events Centre from June 14-17.

The competition is in its seventh year and entries close at the end of March. . .


Rural round-up

November 2, 2015

Dairy prices, lamb returns drive optimism – Dene Mackenzie:

Some encouraging signs have emerged from the latest ASB Farmshed Economics report with dairy markets moving back towards normal and lamb a quiet achiever.

ASB chief economist Nick Tuffley said dairy farmers had reined in production to better reflect current demand, reducing oversupply.

Dairy prices reflected the better balance. Overall prices had lifted more than 50% and whole milk prices more than 70% since August. However, supply and prices still had more work to do. . . 

Prestigious Nuffield scholars for 2016 named – Gerard Hutching:

Four young primary sector leaders have been awarded prestigious Nuffield scholarships.

In the 60 years since the scholarship programme began, more than 140 New Zealanders have been handed the opportunity to travel and study at first-hand the latest international primary sector developments.

The scholars for 2016 are Wellington-based government agriculture development manager Jessica Bensemann, Te Puke dairy farmer Richard Fowler, environmental management adviser turned Central Hawke’s Bay shepherd Samuel Lang and orchard and sheep and beef farm owner Tom Skerman, from Hastings. . . 

Fonterra reaped 25% gain from Bega shares driven to record by Blackmores tie-up – Jonathan Underhill:

(BusinessDesk) – Fonterra Cooperative Group reaped a 25 percent gross gain on its two-year investment in Australia’s Bega Cheese shares, which jumped to a record last week after announcing a partnership with Blackmores that will compete with the New Zealand dairy exporter in China’s infant formula market.

Fonterra spent about A$60.7 million to build a 9 percent stake in Bega in November 2013, which it sold last week for A$74 million. It also received about A$1.6 million of dividends. Fonterra is in the process of transforming its Australian business, having taken a $108 million writedown of its yoghurt and dairy desserts assets across the Tasman in 2015. The gain on the Bega shares compares to a 5 percent return on capital from its Oceania consumer and food service business in 2015.

The sale wouldn’t affect Fonterra’s commercial relationship with Bega, which includes a licence on the Bega brand and a supply contract for cheese, said chief financial officer Lukas Paravicini. The sale was the best use of the capital, he said. . . .

Could drones, apps and electrical tape measures feature in the future of the horticultural industry?:

Kiwi ingenuity is alive and well and at its cutting edge best in the local horticultural industry as some startlingly innovative ideas – featuring everything from apps to drones – have begun to emerge from the innovation leg of this year’s Young Horticulturist of the Year Competition’.

The finalists, five young men and one woman, come from all over New Zealand – all winners of their individual sector competitions – and are going head to head to decide who will be named ‘Young Horticulturist of the Year 2015’ after the grand final, which is held over the two days of November 11 and 12 at the Auckland Botanic Gardens in Manurewa. . . .

Voting for the 2015 Fonterra Elections Underway:

Voting is now open for the 2015 Fonterra Board of Directors’ Elections and the Shareholders’ Councillor Elections in four wards.

This year there are six candidates standing for the Board of Directors. They are Murray Beach, Greg Maughan, Blue Read, Nicola Shadbolt, Ashley Waugh and John Wilson.

Fonterra shareholders have the opportunity to meet and ask questions of the Director candidates at the eleven Directors’ Election Candidate Roadshow meetings which run from Sunday, 8 November to Friday, 13 November 2015. . . .

Increased rebate for DMS’ growers:

Bay of Plenty Kiwifruit management company, DMS, has announced it has increased its shareholder rebate for the 2015/2016 year by 10 cents to 30 cents for Grower shareholders, an increase that is attributed to increased profitability of the business.

DMS is a Bay of Plenty owned and operated orchard management and post-harvest operator, with two major packhouse sites in Te Puke and Te Puna.

DMS Director, Craig Greenlees, says the rebate increase demonstrates the recent growth enjoyed by DMS, plus implementing strategies that focuses on fruit quality from orchard management to packing. . . 

Conservation Week 2015: Healthy Nature, Healthy People:

Conservation Week 2015 is a chance to get active outdoors and look after New Zealand’s natural world, Conservation Minister Maggie Barry says.

“The theme for 2015 is ‘Healthy Nature, Healthy People’ and it’s about the link between looking after our special natural places and the tangible health benefits you can enjoy from experiencing them.”

“We want New Zealanders to get out into our conservation land, whether it’s for exercise, relaxation, getting away from it all or helping out with one of the hundreds of different groups doing great work to protect our natural heritage.” . . .


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