Rural round-up

16/01/2015

Goodman Fielder to commercialise three new products with health benefits – Fiona Rotherham:

(BusinessDesk) – Goodman Fielder, the food ingredients manufacturer facing a takeover from Wilmar International and First Pacific Co, will commercialise three new food products this year with health benefits for consumers – the first of a pipeline of innovation into smart foods.

The three patented products include a new baking product with enhanced health properties and two dairy products with improved sensory and health attributes, the company said in a statement.

Goodman Fielder research and innovation senior manager Shantanu Das said he couldn’t say more about the products at this stage other than they should reach shop shelves in the next 12 months and “the public will judge for themselves”. . .

 

Sanford Welcomes Efforts of New Zealand Authorities to Stop Illegal Fishing:

As one of only two New Zealand companies permitted to source toothfish from the Ross Sea fishery, Sanford  welcomes the current efforts of the New Zealand Government, Navy and other New Zealand agencies to fight illegal fishing in the waters of Antarctica.

This week the HMNZS WELLINGTON intercepted three vessels fishing illegally in the Southern Ocean. Two of the vessels refused to allow New Zealand Navy personnel to board despite their flag states granting approval.

“Illegal fishing poses many dangers, not only for the environment and fish stocks, but also for responsible licensed crew and vessels that may be called upon to assist in the search and rescue of these rogue operators when they get into trouble operating in these remote and isolated areas,” says Greg Johansson, Sanford’s Chief Operations Officer. . .

 Criticism of Navy over illegal fishing operation unjustified:

Defence Minister Gerry Brownlee says ill-informed criticism of the Royal New Zealand Navy’s operation involving illegal fishing in the Southern Ocean ignores the success of the operation.

“The offshore patrol vessel Wellington and its crew have done a very good job in very challenging conditions in the Southern Ocean.

“They have successfully located, tracked and intercepted these vessels, and obtained the necessary evidence and documentation to enable further enforcement steps to be taken by the appropriate authorities. . .

Hydroponic herb business ‘never stops’ – Sue O’Dowd:

Even though summertime is salad time, the seasons make little difference to a vast North Taranaki hydroponic herb growing operation, as Sue O’Dowd discovers.

 All year round, herbs and assorted young salad greens fly out the door of a North Taranaki glasshouse to restaurants and supermarket shelves around New Zealand.

Natural Fare has created a nationwide reputation for the quality and flavour of its produce since Russell and Jan Jordan set up the business at Bell Block in the early 1980s.

New Plymouth Fresha owner Stephen Shaw, who has 20 years international experience as a chef, said that without doubt Jordan’s products were world-class. Not only were Natural Fare herbs fresh, each leaf in his mesclun mix had its own distinct flavour. . .

Taranaki dairy cow numbers on the rise – Sue O’Dowd:

Dairy cows in Taranaki have increased by more than 10 per cent the last 20 years as herd numbers have fallen almost a third.

Latest figures from DairyNZ put the number of cows in the province in 2013-14 at just over 493,000 in 1719 herds, about 54,500 more than the 1992-93 season when there were 2587 herds.

Taranaki farmers own 10 per cent of the country’s dairy cows and 14 per cent of herds.

At nearly 175,000ha, the amount of land used for dairy farming in Taranaki was slightly more in 1992-93 than in 2013-14 when it was just over 173,000ha. The current figure represents 10 per cent of the land used for dairy farming in New Zealand. . .

Historic multi-peril payouts – Gregor Heard:

AUSTRALIAN farmers are set to receive what are believed to be the first substantial payouts for multi-peril crop insurance (MPCI) within days.

Chief executive of Latevo International Andrew Trotter said his company had been told by its reinsurer that it would be paid for its first three claims and was currently finalising the formalities for payment to proceed.

He said he hoped it would be the final step towards widespread farmer acceptance of MPCI. . .

 


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