Rural round-up

02/06/2012

Munro puts lid on thankless task to disestablish Wool Board – Jonathan Underhill:

May 29 (BusinessDesk) – Wool Board Disestablishment Co has made its final report, having met its 2003 target for distributions in a decade-long process that left chairman Bruce Munro vowing never again to be involved in such a thankless, poorly paid task.

The directors of DisCo will resign and unrestricted access to the shell will be transferred to NZAX-listed Wool Equities, the company established to preserve and use some $300 million of tax losses for the benefit of growers. . .

Annual challenge for South Island Farmers ‘Good for Business’

Farmers who have won the annual Lincoln University Foundation South Island Farmer of the Year Award say winning the competition is good for business.

The prestigious annual award is open for entries for 2012 and previous winners say that entering brings more than prestige and prize money – it makes a difference for their farm’s bottom line too.

The aim of the Lincoln University Foundation South Island Farmer of the Year competition is to reward farmers whose work showcases the best of what can be achieved in farming. It is more than being a ‘good farmer’, it means operating in a way that shows leadership, innovation, efficiency and sustainability. . .

Fertiliser Quality Council Pleased With Podcast Response :

The Fertiliser Quality Council (FQC) is really pleased with the response to the webcast launching the program New Zealand Needs Fertiliser and Plants Need Food. It is a short, sharp educational program aimed at correcting the myths over fertiliser use.

FQC chair Neil Barton said that the immediate response of 361 full views, plus a few on Facebook, was great news for the fertiliser industry. In addition the vast majority watched the program right through.

“For too long we have had the self-styled environmental disciples perpetuating myths about fertiliser and its use,” Neil Barton said. “We now have a science-based program refuting that. The fact that almost 400 New Zealanders decided to watch the launch of the program, including a motivational address by Prof Rowarth from the University of Waikato Business School, is most heartening. . .

New board member elected to NZYF Board at Conference Week

Young Farmers from all over New Zealand spent a week in Dunedin last week for the TBfree New Zealand Young Farmers National Conference. Conference delegates went on a bus trip, took part in workshops, supported their favourite Contestant in The National Bank Young Farmer Contest and the also attended the 2012 Annual General Meeting.

 The AGM was held at Dunedin’s College of Education and two board members were elected – both roles were for two year terms. Twenty five year old Dunsandel dairy farmer Cole Groves was re-elected after sitting on the board for the past year. Twenty eight year old dairy farmer Cam Lewis from the Opiki Club was also elected. Previously Mr Lewis has worked as a rural banker and completed the Kellogg Rural Leaders Programme in 2009 as the youngest participant ever.

Mr Lewis will join Mr Groves and the two other elected members on the board: 31 year old Chairman and potato grower Paul Olsen who is from the Opiki Club and 30 year old sheep and beef farmer, Vice-chairperson Vanessa Hore from the Upper Manuherikia Club. Several other board members make up the NZYF board: Contest Chairman Bevan Proffit, Co-opted Board Member Sarah von Dadleszen, Strategic Partner James Christie, Strategic Partner Barbara Kuriger and NZYF CEO Richard Fitzgerald. . .

Fund makes outdoor access easier

Twenty-two projects designed to improve access to the outdoors will receive funding through the New Zealand Walking Access Commission’s Enhanced Access Fund.

Fifty organisations applied for a portion of the $230,000 made available in this year’s funding round. The contestable fund contributes to the Commission’s goal of free, certain, enduring and practical walking access to the outdoors.

Commission Chief Executive Mark Neeson said 2012 grant recipients came from all over New Zealand, from the Brynderwyn Ranges in Northland to Mataura in Southland. Projects that will receive funding range from new tracks and boardwalks to bridges and signage that makes existing access easier to find. . .


December 5 in history

05/12/2009

On December 5:

63 BC Cicero read the last of his Catiline Orations.

1360 The French Franc was created.

20 franc coin

1484  Pope Innocent VIII issued the Summis desiderantes, a papal bull that deputised Heinrich Kramer and James Sprenger as inquisitors to root out alleged witchcraft in Germany and led to one of the most oppressive witch hunts in European history.

1492  Christopher Columbus became the first European to set foot on the island of Hispaniola, now Haiti.
Hispaniola lrg.jpg
1766 In London, James Christie held his first sale.
1830 Christina Rossetti, English poet, was born.
1839 George Armstrong Custer, American general, was born.
G a custer.jpg
1848 California Gold Rush: US President James K. Polk confirmed that large amounts of gold had been discovered in California.
Panning for gold on the Mokelumne River

1859 John Jellicoe, British admiral, was born.

John Jellicoe Admiral of the fleet.jpg

1872  Harry Nelson Pillsbury, American chess player, was born.

Harrynelsonpillsbury.jpg

1979  Clyde Cessna, American airplane manufacturer, was born.

 

Clyde Cessna posing beside the silverwing

1890 New Zealand’s first one-man-one-vote election took place.

1901 Walt Disney, American animated film producer, was born.

1932  German-born Swiss physicist Albert Einstein was granted an American visa.

1932  Little Richard, American singer and pianist, was born.

1933 Prohibition in the United States ended when : Utah ratified the Twenty-first Amendment to the United States Constitution, thus establishing the required 75% of states needed to enact the amendment (this overturned the 18th Amendment which had made the manufacture, sale, or transportation of alcohol illegal in the United States).

 

Detroit police inspecting equipment found in a clandestine underground brewery during the Prohibition era

1938  J. J. Cale, American songwriter, was born.

1943  Abyssinia Crisis: Italian troops attacked Wal Wal in Abyssinia, taking four days to capture the city.

1936 The Soviet Union adopted a new constitution and the Kirghiz Soviet Socialist Republic was established as a full Union Republic of the USSR.

1945 Flight 19 was lost in the Bermuda Triangle.

Map of Flight 19’s flight plan and final position on December 5.
1955 E.D. Nixon and Rosa Parks lead the Montgomery Bus Boycott.
1957 Sukarno expelled all Dutch people from Indonesia.

1958  Subscriber Trunk Dialling (STD) was inaugurated in the UK by Queen Elizabeth II when she speaks to the Lord Provost in a call from Bristol to Edinburgh.

1958 The Preston bypass, the UK‘s first stretch of motorway, opened to traffic for the first time.

1963 Eddie “the Eagle” Edwards, English ski jumper, was born.

1964 Captain Roger Donlon was awarded the first Medal of Honor of the Vietnam War.

DonlonMOHSF.jpg

1983  Dissolution of the Military Junta in Argentina.

2005 The Civil Partnership Act came into effect in the United Kingdom, and the first civil partnership was registered there.

2006 Commodore Frank Bainimarama overthrew the government in Fiji.

Sourced from NZ History Online & wikipedia.


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