Rural round-up

August 7, 2019

Plant milk’s worse for the environment than cow milk:  Fonterra  – Gerard Hutching:

If you are drinking plant-based “milks” because you think they are better for the environment, think again says a Fonterra scientist.

Nielsen Scantrack data shows sales of alternative milks have taken off in the past two years, with 25 per cent of total market share of all milk categories. In 2017 Kiwis spent $52 million on them, but that has risen to $144m in the last 12 months, with almond milk the most popular, followed by soya.

The value of the alternative milk market is growing at 7.6 per cent a year, while cow milk value is flat. . .

Speak Up experience transforming – Sally Rae:

If she was to look back at the person she was nearly two years ago, Elle Perriam reckons she would not recognise herself.

Miss Perriam is the very public face of rural mental health awareness campaign Will to Live, which was launched following the death of her boyfriend, Will Gregory, in December 2017.

Speaking during a Speak Up tour – events were held in Balclutha, Winton and Hawea last week and more were planned for Kurow on August 15 and Middlemarch on August 16 – she said it was rewarding and motivating. . .

Contemplating the big numbers in exports and imports – Joyce Wyllie:

 Whenever you sit in the car and turn the key in the ignition you simply expect the engine to start. No thoughts to carburettors, sparks, fuel, explosions, pistons, drive shaft, moving parts, wheels going round and how it all happens. Just taken for granted that one small movement of the hand initiates amazing mechanics causing movement in the machine.

Occasionally it doesn’t work which creates concern and limits immediate travel choices. Also when going places in the car not much thought is given to the place where that vehicle came from to where it’s now being used. Supply, imports, transport, trade, money going round and the privilege of ownership are, generally, all taken for granted.

After seeing the last of our season’s lambs mustered, drafted, weighed, loaded on trucks and driven away from the farm I wondered where they may have ended up. Our meat company provided some interesting information on markets and destination from the Nelson plant.  . . 

No scheme to manage hundreds of dams, but regulations concern farmers – Phil Pennington:

New Zealand lacks any scheme to monitor and maintain the structural integrity of hundreds of dams nationwide, but is now playing catch up trying to bring in controversial safety regulations.

The risks are illustrated at the town of Whaley Bridge in the UK, where thousands of people have been evacuated because an old clay dam holding a billion litres of water is cracking.

“Dams are still failing in highly developed countries in this day and age, and the Whaley Bridge example – it’s still happening,” vice chair of the New Zealand Society on Large Dams, Dan Forster, said. . .

Real characters at indoor dog trials – Sally Rae:

It could well be worth a trip to this week’s Southern Indoor Charity Dog Trial at Waimumu just to meet Jack and Mack.

In a sport which is littered with characters, 80-year-old Jack Condon could only be described as one out of the box.

Mr Condon is making the trip from Bruce Bay in South Westland, where he has been staying recently, towing a caravan in case he could not find accommodation in Gore.

After only taking up dog trialling in his 70s, he was bringing Mack – his “champion dog”, he laughed – whom he described as a “nice fella“. . .

2019 Plate to Pasture youth scholarships:

Silver Fern Farms has presented six young people from around New Zealand with Plate to Pasture Youth Scholarships as recognition for their ideas to further the sustainability of the red meat sector.

Each recipient received $5000 to go toward their careers in the red meat sector. Silver Fern Farms Chief Executive Simon Limmer says this year’s applicants were asked to explore the issues of sustainability in the red meat sector and present their solutions for farms, processing and in-market. . .


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