Invisible Farmer Project – Emma Moss

09/02/2020

The Invisible Farmer Project is a Museums Victoria initiative:

The Invisible Farmer Project was the largest ever study of Australian women on the land, uncovering the histories and stories of Australian women in agriculture. It began as a pilot project (2015-2016) and evolved into a three year (2017-2020) nation-wide partnership between rural communities, academic, government and cultural organisations, funded by the Australian Research Council. It sought to address the historical and contemporary invisibility of Australian farm women and to celebrate the creative and vital role that women play in sustaining Australian farms and rural communities. It combined personal narratives and academic research to map the diverse, innovate and vital role of women in Australian agriculture. Key outcomes of the project were:

  • Creation of new histories of rural Australia, including a series of interviews collected for Museums Victoria’s Invisible Farmer Project collection;
  • Enhanced understandings about the diverse, innovative and vital role of women in agriculture and rural communities;
  • Educate communities about the diverse, innovative and vital role of women in agriculture and rural communities;
  • Stimulation of public discussions about contemporary issues facing rural Australia and its future;
  • Development of significant public collections that will shape research, industry and public policy into the future;
  • A widespread media and social media campaign that saw hundreds of thousands of community members engaging with the stories of Australian farm women via the Project’s website (www.invisiblefarmer.net.au), Instagram, Facebook and Twitter (@invisfarmer). . .

Invisible Farmer Project – Steph Evans

02/02/2020

The Invisible Farmer Project was an initiative of Museums Victoria:

The Invisible Farmer Project was the largest ever study of Australian women on the land, uncovering the histories and stories of Australian women in agriculture. It began as a pilot project (2015-2016) and evolved into a three year (2017-2020) nation-wide partnership between rural communities, academic, government and cultural organisations, funded by the Australian Research Council. It sought to address the historical and contemporary invisibility of Australian farm women and to celebrate the creative and vital role that women play in sustaining Australian farms and rural communities. It combined personal narratives and academic research to map the diverse, innovate and vital role of women in Australian agriculture. Key outcomes of the project were:

  • Creation of new histories of rural Australia, including a series of interviews collected for Museums Victoria’s Invisible Farmer Project collection;
  • Enhanced understandings about the diverse, innovative and vital role of women in agriculture and rural communities;
  • Educate communities about the diverse, innovative and vital role of women in agriculture and rural communities;
  • Stimulation of public discussions about contemporary issues facing rural Australia and its future;
  • Development of significant public collections that will shape research, industry and public policy into the future;
  • A widespread media and social media campaign that saw hundreds of thousands of community members engaging with the stories of Australian farm women via the Project’s website (www.invisiblefarmer.net.au), Instagram, Facebook and Twitter (@invisfarmer).


Invisible Farmer – Introducing Nikki Guttler

18/01/2020

The Invisible Farmer project is a Museums Victoria initiative. You can read more about it here.

 


The ‘Invisible Farmer’ who saved the family farm

12/01/2020

The Invisible Farmer project is a Museums Victoria initiative. You can read more about it here.


Invisible Farmer – Ladies on the Land

11/01/2020

The Invisible Farmer project is a Museums Victoria initiative. You can read more about it here.


The Invisible Farmer Project Behind the Scenes

05/01/2020

The Invisible Farmer Project

04/01/2020

The Invisible Farmer Project is a wonderful initiative by Museums Victoria:

The Invisible Farmer project seeks to address the historical and contemporary invisibility of Australian farming women and to celebrate the creative and vital role that women play in sustaining Australian farms and rural communities. It will combine personal narratives and academic research to map the diverse, innovate and vital role of women in Australian agriculture. The project involves a creative partnership between rural communities, academics, government and cultural organisations. Together we will:

  • Create new histories of rural Australia
  • Reveal the unknown stories of women on the land
  • Educate communities about the diverse, innovative and vital role of women in agriculture and rural communities
  • Stimulate public discussions about contemporary issues facing rural Australia and its future
  • Develop significant public collections that will enable far reaching outcomes in research, industry and public policy. . .


Celebrating rural women

15/10/2018

It’s the International Day of Rural Women.

This year’s theme is: Sustainable infrastructure, services and social protection for gender equality and the empowerment of rural women and girls.

Rural women make up a quarter of the world’s population. They grow much of our food, strengthen economies and build climate resilience.

From championing access to clean water in Kyrgyzstan to boosting sustainable agriculture in Ethiopia, rural women are mobilizing to support one another, and their contributions are vital for both rural communities and urban societies.

Yet, on almost every measure of development, because of gender inequalities and discrimination, they fare worse than rural men or urban women. . .

This year, we are calling for better public services, including health care, education, childcare and shelters, on which millions of rural women depend; and laws, policies and budgets to improve their livelihoods and well-being.

We stand in solidarity with rural women and their organizations everywhere as they seek to influence the decisions that shape their lives. . .

Most of the problems the day seeks to highlight  apply much more to women in the developing world where agriculture is a lot less sophisticated and there is a lot less mechanisation and a lot more uncertainty about land ownership and women’s legal rights.

When I was working as a rural journalist I was often the only woman at farming meetings and field days. Now it is much more common to see women not only in attendance but in positions of responsibility in  farming and rural organisations.

Rural women in New Zealand are much more involved in agriculture, apiculture, horticulture and viticulture and processing and support businesses in their own right or as active partners and they have equal rights under the law.

Organisations like the Agri-Women’s Development Trust do a lot of work to encourage rural women to make the most of their skills.


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