Rural round-up

06/10/2020

Regenerative agriculture has become ‘political football’:

Regenerative agriculture has become “a bit of a political football” lately, and people need to regain perspective, Director and Management Consultant for Baker Ag Chris Garland says.

Farmers who practise regenerative agriculture were “sincere about what they’re doing”, and Garland thought they may be feeling “a bit overwhelmed” by the attention it had received lately.

Last week Environment Minister James Shaw was interviewed by The Country’s Jamie Mackay about the Green Party’s agriculture policy, which focused on moving New Zealand to organic and regenerative practices.

Garland heard the interview and accused Mackay of “whipping it into a bit of a frenzy”, although he did admit the Green Party co-leader didn’t really understand regenerative agriculture. . . 

Picture of snow costs to emerge – Laura Smith:

This day-old Southland lamb survived this week’s weather bomb, but most farmers around Southland are still working out the cost of the snow.

Southland Federated Farmers president Geoffrey Young said while some lamb deaths were normal, the snow would have affected the numbers — particularly in high country and foothills where lambing had just begun.

It was too early to tell how many died as the snow was only just clearing, he said.

“It was dry snow and that is not nearly as severe on young lambs as very heavy persistent rain.” . . 

Office to orchard, why these Kiwis are making the move to primary sector – Caitlin Ellis:

New Zealanders are switching the office for the orchard and the cockpit for cows in a bid to stay working following the economic turmoil caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE) has reported a 60 percent increase in people receiving jobseeker benefits compared to this time last year in its quarterly labour market report. 

The report presents the state of the labour market in the March 2020 quarter in which the number of unemployed people rose by 5000 to 116,000. The current unemployment rate is 4.2 percent and economists are predicting a rise to somewhere between 5 to 6 percent. . . 

Lime business helps expand biodiversity – Yvonne O’Hara:

Following some trial and error, plus a little experience, a new nursery programme beside a lime mining site at Browns, near Winton, has germinated about 10,000 native seedlings in its first year.

The 480ha AB Lime site also has a 950-cow, 380ha dairy farm, with a neighbouring 70ha of native bush, including 13ha of wetlands, under restoration.

AB Lime environmental field officer Ainsley Adams said the ultimate goal was to translocate kakariki and South Island robins back into the area.

People would be able to see the dairy farm, native bush and wetlands at a field day hosted by the Mid-Oreti Catchment Group on October 8.

“We want to showcase what we are doing.” . . 

Fonterra sells China farms:

Fonterra has agreed to sell its China farms for a total of $555 million (RMB 2.5 billion*1), after successfully developing the farms alongside local partners.

Inner Mongolia Natural Dairy Co., Ltd, a subsidiary of China Youran Dairy Group Limited (Youran), has agreed to purchase Fonterra’s two farming-hubs in Ying and Yutian for $513 million (RMB 2.31 billion*1).

Separately, Fonterra has agreed to sell its 85 per cent interest in its Hangu farm to Beijing Sanyuan Venture Capital Co., Ltd. (Sanyuan), for $42 million (RMB 190 million*1). Sanyuan has a 15 per cent minority shareholding in the farm and exercised their right of first refusal to purchase Fonterra’s interest.

CEO Miles Hurrell says in building the farms, Fonterra has demonstrated its commitment to the development of the Chinese dairy industry. . . 

Wildfire ravaged this rancher’s cattle and maybe his family legacy. He blames politics – Anita Chabria:

Dave Daley stood recently on the edge of a barren ridge and bellowed out a guttural cry meant to call his cows home — if any remained alive after the North Complex wildfire decimated this national forest.

It was a long, mellifluous chant that sounded like “Come Boss,” taught to him by his own father and, he thinks, maybe originating with the genus of the species he hoped to find, Bos taurus, domesticated cattle.

When the sound finished bouncing off the far hills, miles across a plunging valley where the Feather River meandered into Lake Oroville, he waited in a silence so deep it can be made only by absence — of animals in underbrush, of leaves for wind to rustle, of life — hoping to hear the clanking of the bells each of his animals wears. But the silence held.

“You can replace a house,” he said, his voice hoarse and sorrow crinkling the sun-baked lines around his eyes, their color a pale green-brown that mirrored the scorched pine needles nearby. “You can’t replace this.” . .


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