Rural round-up

March 2, 2015

Farmers are not bulletproof – Neal Wallace:

It was a decision hundreds of farmers make every day. 

But Andrew Fleming’s decision to take a shortcut up the spur of a hill rather than a longer route that involved opening and closing six gates was a life-changing few seconds.

It was October 2000 and near the top of the spur on his in-laws Taranaki farm, the front wheel of his quad bike lifted as he crossed a sheep rut and he believes wind, which had grown in strength in the minutes leading up to the incident, caught under the guards of the quad bike helping to tip it over. . .

Forest safety paradigm shift from international experts:

After a horror year of workplace fatalities in 2013, New Zealand’s forest industry performed superbly in 2014, both in terms of safety and wood production. The credit for the dramatic turnaround in safety performance has to go to the people on the forest floor. These hard-working people were the same ones who made their voice heard at the Independent Forest Safety Review. They did it to ensure workplaces in forestry could be safer for everyone.

As part of the sweeping safety reform in forestry workplaces, the Forest Industry Engineering Association (FIEA) is bringing international safety experts to New Zealand next week for an industry-wide summit. At this event, forest safety leaders and forest company CEOs will have access to the best safety thinkers in the business globally. . .

 

Drought shows water storage vital – Katie Milne:

Water storage will never stop the types of drought which have just been declared throughout the eastern South Island.

But water retention schemes can blunt their impact and negate their effect.

It should be a no brainer.  We are, as Geoffrey Palmer so famously once put it, a pluvial country – in other words, it rains a lot here.

In simple terms, the problem is that most rain falls when it’s too cold for pasture to grow.  And, conversely, it doesn’t rain when it’s warm enough for pasture to grow.

We are so accustomed to farming in between these seasons in our spring and autumn flushes that we don’t realise that in other parts of the world it doesn’t happen that way.  It’s not even universal in New Zealand. . .

Last chance to reunite the Bee Industry:

Federated Farmers is calling on the bee industry to unite and ensure they achieve a fully integrated entity peak body.

John Hartnell, Federated Farmers Bee Chairperson says “The bee industry has long needed a more united approach to its activities, whether it’s to do with the government, market access or biosecurity, but it can only be achieved with the whole industry united as one.”

“When you look at the current structure of the industry well less than 1000 are members of an industry body, whilst the industry has 5400 involved. That is our main problem because you end up with 20 percent funding 100 percent of industry good activity.” . . .

 

A2 Milk 1H profit tumbles 81% as listing costs, fees rise, lodges ASX application – Paul McBeth:

(BusinessDesk) – A2 Milk Co, which markets milk with a protein variant said to have health benefits, said first-half profit fell 81 percent on costs for its planned ASX listing, lodged today, and for hiring consultants.

Net profit dropped to $125,000, or 0.02 cents per share, in the six months ended Dec. 31, from $643,000, or 0.11 cents, a year earlier, the Auckland-based company said in a statement. That included $762,000 in one-time costs associated with the Australian listing, and a $1.4 million increase in other operating costs to $5.3 million, which was largely selling and consulting costs linked to business growth, it said.

Excluding those costs, earnings before interest, tax, depreciation and amortisation climbed 27 percent to $3.3 million as revenue rose 38 percent to $74.8 million, largely in line with Forsyth Barr’s estimate for sales of $75.2 million and Ebitda of $3 million. . . .

Farmers need to step-up their human capital risk planning:

Farmers aren’t paying enough attention to human capital risk planning, says Hastings-based Crowe Horwath Risk Adviser Tim Ewen.

Although the intellectual property underpinning the farm’s wealth was often tied up with the owner, too little focus was placed on the “what-if?” factor, he said. In the event of a farmer becoming either temporarily or totally disabled, or passing away, planning was essential to make sure the farm business could continue to provide for family members.

“Farms rely on key people to make the business work,” said Mr Ewen. “Farmers need to take account of the human capital risk and ensure they have appropriate planning in place so the right money goes to the right people at the right time.” . . .

 

 


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