Rural round-up

March 11, 2020

Quarry opposition raises the question; is grape growing next? – Brendon Burns:

Given I do some work for the quarry sector nationally – hereby declared – I have to date totally refrained from any public comment or submission on the Simcox quarry resource consent renewal in Omaka Valley where I am a resident.

I also don’t particularly wish to alienate neighbours in my community but the various articles in recent days prompt me to write because there has been little aired publicly to provide any contrast to what’s being said.

My wife and I have owned land here since 2001, so we are not recent arrivals. Mind you, the quarry was here long before most of us arrived, which might suggest it has some rights to continue. . .

Coronavirus: Harvest will happen, says Wine Marlborough boss – Sophie Trigger:

Coronavirus could have “major” implications for this year’s harvest, with concerns screening processes, travel restrictions and quarantine requirements could leave a hole in the vintage workforce.

Marlborough’s harvest season is dependent on foreign workers, and more than 1000 skilled workers are expected to arrive in the region this time of year.

But some have been delayed by quarantine requirements or have been unable to travel at all due to the risk of a coronavirus/Covid-19 outbreak. . . 

New Zealand dairy supplier ready for resumption of work in China:

New Zealand supplier of dairy product said Monday it is ready for the resumption of work in China, with Mark Pulman, CEO of Green Valley Distribution manufacturing fresh milk for Theland emphasizing his optimistic outlook towards China’s consumption market trend on Monday.

As positive signs are emerging continuously in China’s battle against the COVID-19 outbreak, the country is expanding business operations with a precise approach that attaches different priorities to regions considering their health conditions. Milk New Zealand Dairy company resumed the work of supply chain and sales operation functions in most regions of China gradually.

Mark Pulman suggested the firms allocated at the upstream of the supply chain should be given business resumption priorities, such as dairy manufacture that produce basic raw materials. . .

Golden Shears original Ian ‘Snow’ Harrison back in action :

Age may have been one difference for octogenarian shearer Ian Harrison as he shore at the 60th Golden Shears today.

But another was that the result didn’t matter to the 86-year-old sole-survivor of the first of the famous Golden shears Open finals from 1961.

Barely troubled by his one-sheep appearance back on the stage in Masterton’s War Memorial Stadium, he was more interested in catching-up with old friends, and wasn’t troubled by the fact he’d have to wait till morning to find-out the official result. . . 

Not sure which is worse, drought or paradise ducks – Julie Paton:

Did I say it was dry last month? What was I thinking? Without so much as a drop of rain for around six weeks the definition of dry has taken on a new meaning. A few drops fell last week but you could practically count them on one hand.

They hit the ground and sizzled into nothingness without doing any good. In fact, those few drops probably just tickled the dormant facial eczema spores sitting on the shrivelled grass into sitting up and thinking it’s time to party.

It often seems to be the way – with an approaching high payout, something ghastly happens. Usually a drought, but sometimes the entire world economy falls apart. This time we have a drought plus the threat of a global pandemic as a bonus extra. . . 

Calving in sync with nature – Paul Brown:

It wasn’t too long ago that February and March were our busiest and most stressful months on the ranch. Like most other ranchers in the area, it was calving season for us. For years we calved during this time of year because it was “normal.” The argument is that the calves would be bigger in the fall once they were weaned and sold on the commodity market. Although this argument is true, it comes with detrimental costs in the form of stress, increased death loss, lack of sleep, and very hard work.

Calving during late winter/early spring required a lot of work for us. As you know, the weather can be quite variable from sub zero temperatures and blizzards to 40 degrees and rain. Therefore, cattle had to be constantly watched, pens had to be bedded with fresh straw and cleaned regularly and expecting mothers would have to be cycled through the calving barn as they calved. . . 


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