Rural round-up

07/01/2021

Massive deluge ‘kick in teeth ‘ at start of year – Hamish MacLean:

The deluge that drowned crops, dug up roads, and overwhelmed water supplies in Otago to start the year was a “real kick in the teeth” for many.

In some places, localised downpours dumped up to a third of the annual average rainfall for an area on to land and into rivers that could not cope.

And while a cleanup that could take weeks or months was under way yesterday, the region’s mayors said Otago had weathered another major storm.

Central Otago Mayor Tim Cadogan said things were slowly returning to normal yesterday but roads remained closed, bridges were damaged, and three towns were on boil-water notices. . . 

Few ATMs, unreliable internet – and now banks cheque-mate farmers – Nikki Mandow:

Banks are accused of discriminating against rural customers by phasing out cheques before the broadband rollout to farms is complete. A Rural Women survey shows one in four families have little or no bank or ATM access, and many still have no internet – but the banks are ripping up their cheques.

Farmers and rural households are being told to switch to internet banking when banks stop accepting cheques this year. Yet thousands still have no access to broadband. Go figure.

In August 2020, Rural Women NZ sent out a survey to members, a survey which garnered the highest response rate that government relations manager Angela McLeod can remember over the two years she’s been in the job. 

Her members weren’t getting hot under the collar about health or education, agriculture or the environment. It wasn’t even a survey about firearms – although that survey got the second highest response rate.  . . 

How the Canes make hay while the sun shines – The Country:

Malcolm Cane has always preferred to do it himself, from silage and haymaking to drilling and cultivating.

Looking back over 30 years of deer-farming, it’s probably been a big part of his success.

Cane and his wife Kathy farm 390ha at Reporoa, of which 146ha is leased to a dairy farmer.

The Canes run about 1000 stags and 500 hinds, plus about 500 mixed-sex weaners at any one time. . . 

Detectors help bat walks work – Richard Davison:

Visitors to the Catlins have a chance to catch one of the area’s more elusive residents on the wing this summer.

Owaka couple Annette and Murray Patterson are leading a pair of New Zealand long-tailed bat detection walks during the holidays, under the twin banners of South Otago Forest and Bird, and the Catlins Bats on the Map project.

The first, successful, outing took place on December 29, and aspiring chiropterologists (bat scientists) could sign up for the second, at Tawanui, on Saturday, January 16, Mrs Patterson said.

The walks form part of an ongoing study programme led by self-described “bat lady” Catriona Gower, which has identified key Catlins locations for the critically endangered native mammal species. . . 

People are seasonal too – Stephen Barnard:

Over the festive period a number of city folk will have packed the car and travelled into the regions to catch up with their farming relatives.

If they completed the same trip last year they might have noticed changes in the countryside on their way. Hopefully greener pasture, fuller dams and fatter livestock.

Once arrived they might have been greeted by a swarm of flies, a pack of farm dogs making an eager inspection, and by talk of the weather, the harvest and the market.

Depending on the farm, they’ll have witnessed a flurry of activity as crops were harvested, or else not much at all as their family members took a well-earned break. . .

Emphasise UK meat’s sustainability this year, sector says :

Wales could put forward positive credentials as the world’s most sustainable place to produce red meat as climate change is set to dominate 2021, according to an industry figure.

In his New Year’s Day message, Hybu Cig Cymru – Meat Promotion Wales (HCC) chairman Kevin Roberts painted an up-beat picture of the long-term future of Welsh red meat.

Mr Roberts’s reminded the food and farming industry that Welsh beef and lamb were strong brands that consumers could trust in uncertain times.

He pointed out that UK retail sales of lamb and beef had risen in 2020 as consumers supported domestic farmers, that European importers had stuck with Welsh meat through the worst of Brexit uncertainty, and that long-term work to develop new markets was paying off. . . 


Rural round-up

10/01/2020

Irrigators say future threatened by ORC water policy – Jono Edwards:

Scores of irrigators have told the Otago Regional Council the direction of its deemed permit overhaul will ‘‘destroy rural New Zealand’’.

They are at odds with environmentalists who are pleading that the status quo should not continue.

Twenty-one groups spoke at the council’s public forum yesterday about changes to its deemed permits process, which it has been instructed to undertake by Environment Minister David Parker.

Deemed permit irrigators have been working towards next year’s deadline to replace mining water privileges with consents. . . 

Bega Cheese hit with fears over milk supply after fire devastation – Patrick Hatch:

Bega Cheese’s shares fell 9.3 per cent to $3.92 on Monday, as the company and its dairy providers started to assess the damage caused by fires that have raged around the towns of Bega and Cobargo.

About 30 to 40 farmers had been affected in the area, said Shaughn Morgan, chief executive of the industry group Dairy Connect, with some reporting they had lost the bulk of their livestock.

Other farmers without power were struggling to milk their cows, while others were spilling their milk because dairy processors including Bega were unable to access roads to collect their produce. . . 

Rabobank announces extended support measures for bushfire impacted clients:

Agribusiness banking specialist Rabobank has announced extended support measures for bushfire impacted clients, following further widespread fire activity in recent days.

Rabobank Australia CEO Peter Knoblanche said the bank’s staff in bushfire-affected regions were continuing to contact clients to check on their safety and welfare and offer assistance where required.

“Unprecedented fire activity has impacted a significant number of communities across the country, with loss and damage to agricultural land, livestock, houses and infrastructure and most tragically, lives. Although it is still too early to assess the full extent of the damage, the impact of the fires on farming businesses has been compounded by ongoing drought with many holding very limited reserves of feed, fodder and water,” he said. . . 

New Zealand’s first ocean farm divides submitters– Chloe Ranford:

An application from the country’s largest salmon farming company to start farming fish in the “open ocean” has divided opinion, with some calling it an “innovative milestone”, but others labelling it “premature”.

New Zealand King Salmon wants to set up a farm as large as Kāpiti Island in the waters off Marlborough and eventually farm 8000 tonnes of king salmon a year in the colder waters.

It lodged a resource consent with the Marlborough District Council last July asking to build the farm within a 1792-hectare site in the ocean – a New Zealand first. The company says the farming operation will take up a small fraction of the site, 7km north of Cape Lambert. . .

Time for UK farming to ‘reclaim’ January, red meat experts say – Olivia Midgley:

Veganuary will be countered with a co-ordinated message using expert speakers and social media influencers to promote healthy meat-based meals and combat misinformation about the UK farming industry.

Farmers are the most trusted link in the food supply chain, with only six per cent disagreeing and 62 per cent of consumers feeling positive about British agriculture, a survey by AHDB ahead of Veganuary has revealed.

AHDB, which has joined forced with Quality Meat Scotland (QMS) and Hybu Cig Cymru (HCC), to turbocharge the promotion of red meat and its benefits for human health and the environment throughout January, said the industry should be proud to ‘hold its head up high’. . . 

New Zealand Rural Leadership Trust Names Next CEO:

The New Zealand Rural Leadership Trust is pleased to announce the appointment of Chris Parsons, MNZM, DSD as their new Chief Executive Officer. Chris Parsons will replace Anne Hindson on 04 May 2020, following her stepping down as General Manager at end of April.

“We were thrilled by the quality field of candidates and consider ourselves fortunate to have someone of Chris Parsons calibre and experience step up to lead New Zealand Rural Leaders through its next stage of growth,” said Andrew Watters, Chair of the Board of Trustees.

Hailing from the Far North, Chris Parsons has a sheep and beef background and co-owns Ashgrove Genetics Ltd. He is also a decorated Army Officer, Certified Member of the Institute of Directors and holds master’s degrees in management and in strategy. . . 

Body to leave Ruralco, Chan-Dorman chosen chair-elect – Sudesh Kissun:

South Island rural service trader Ruralco says its chairman Alister Body has signalled his intention to step down from his role and pursue broader agribusiness interests.

Body chaired the Ruralco board for the past two years and served as a director since 2011.

Body has agreed to continue to support the business until June 30 when he will retire from the board. . .


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