Rural round-up

September 28, 2015

Freehold on Mackenzie Crown land not an easy ticket to millions, farmers say – Tim Fulton:

Farmers accused of making big profits from Crown land deals in the Mackenzie Basin say they are doing the bare minimum to make a living.

High Country property researcher and Lincoln University academic Dr Ann Brower says the Crown is missing out when tenure review land is sold freehold by farmers.

The median on-selling price per hectare was 493 times the Crown’s original sale price, she said. . .

Signs of movement on dairy as TPP negotiators meet in Atlanta – Pattrick Smellie:

(BusinessDesk) – News media in the US and Canada are reporting signs of a deal coming together on access for dairy products into North America as trade ministers gather in Atlanta, Georgia, for the latest round of talks attempting to conclude the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade and investment pact.

The Atlanta talks are being billed as potentially the final round of talks, although New Zealand Trade Minister Tim Groser has yet to commit to attend them, despite being in the US this week for climate change talks in New York.

He said almost a week ago that there was still no adequate offer from the key TPP dairy-producing countries – the US, Canada and Japan. Market access for dairy products and automobiles, and patent extensions for new generation bio-logic pharmaceuticals, are reportedly the only remaining sticking points of substance between the 12 countries negotiating the new Pacific Rim agreement, which US president Barack Obama is committed to concluding as part of a strategy to assert US geopolitical interests in Asia and counter the rise of China. . . 

No heavy hand – Neal Wallace:

Shanghai Maling president Shen Wei Ping has given an assurance he will not use his casting vote to exert control over Silver Fern Farms should shareholders agree to a partnership between the two food companies.

In an interview during a visit to Dunedin, Shen said the clause giving the Shanghai Maling Aquarius chairman the casting vote on the appointment of the chief executive and annual business plan, was an auditor requirement for reporting the company’s financial results.

He said the proposed deal between the Chinese company and SFF would be a true partnership with board decisions by consensus. . . 

Taggart returned as Ballance director:

Murray Taggart has been returned as a Ballance Agri-Nutrients Ward C director in the South Island after a three-way contest for the position.

Also seeking the directorship were Temuka intensive cropping and livestock finishing farmer Nick Ward and former chief executive of Silver Fern Farms Keith Cooper.

Mr Taggart, who is also chairman of meat co-operative Alliance Group, joined the Ballance board in 2009. He is a past director of CRT Society and Southern Farms NZ, past chairman of the National Meat and Wool Council and Federated Farmers, and past member of the National Board of Federated Farmers. . . 

Generic marketing questioned – Matthew Cawood:

WHEN you have powerful brands, do you need generic marketing?

Agrifood consultant David McKinna posed that rhetorical question to the recent 2015 Meat Industry Conference as part of his discussion on the rise of brand marketing.

“You don’t see your breakfast cereal in generic marketing campaigns. You don’t see generic campaigns for toothpaste. The brands do the job,” he said.

“Your industry has spent a lot of money on generic marketing. As they say in advertising, fifty per cent of it works, but we don’t know which bit.”

Dr McKinna foresees a future in which generic marketing takes a back seat, but doesn’t disappear entirely.  . . 

Government delivers National Policy Direction for Pest Management:

The National Policy Direction for Pest Management has come into effect.

MPI’s director of biosecurity and animal welfare policy, Julie Collins, says established pests are estimated to cost New Zealand’s primary sector up to $3.3 billion annually.

“Even small improvements to New Zealand’s pest management system could save millions of dollars in the long term.”

“The National Direction will support national and regional management of challenging pest issues such as wilding conifers, by ensuring consistent approaches to the way rules are set across New Zealand and that landowner obligations are clearly signalled and underpinned by robust analysis.” . . 

Wendy Harker making Holstein history in NZ – Sonita Chandar:

She may have made history by being elected the first female head of Holstein Friesian New Zealand but the new president says it will not define who she is or what she does.

Wendy Harker, a Te Awamutu breeder, is the first woman to take on the top role in the association’s 105-year history.  She has sat on the board for six years as a council member.

“I have been a part of the national team for six years,” she says. . .

Connie Sue Farmer-Wollenberg's photo.


Rural round-up

July 16, 2015

Trade agreements add up to big savings – Gerard Hutching:

Free trade agreements with China and Taiwan helped save New Zealand $161 million through lower tariffs on sheep and beef exports in 2014.

Beef+ Lamb New Zealand chief executive Scott Champion said the tariff savings were a market access success story, enabling New Zealand to remain competitive on the global market and giving exporters the flexibility to sell products into more markets.

The sector’s export returns for the period total $7.7 billion, with the amount in tariffs paid falling from $331m in 2013 to $326m in 2014.

Meanwhile beef and veal export returns reached a record high of $2.53bn – up $686m on the corresponding period last season. . .

Charities benefit from farmers’ toil – Kate Taylor:

One of Hawke’s Bay’s oldest sheep stations has been profiled in a new book, Kereru Station: Two Sisters’ Legacy.

Kereru Station managers Danny and Robyn Angland run the business to meet the needs of the owners, a partnership between two charitable trusts set up by the late sisters, Gwen Malden and Ruth Nelson. Between them, the two trusts have gifted almost $9 million to several hundred organisations and causes, mostly in Hawke’s Bay. . .

Farm ownership in under 10 years – Tony Benny:

When David Affleck was growing up on a remote sheep, beef and deer farm at the head of Ahaura River on the West Coast, the last thing he wanted to do was milk cows. But when he was offered a job on a dairy farm in Canterbury, that soon changed.

“It wasn’t really what I wanted to do but I gave it a go and I’ve been milking cows ever since, really. I pretty much liked it straightaway and started to learn things pretty quick,” he says.

But his wife, Anna, whose family owned a dairy farm in Reporoa, Bay of Plenty, has always loved cows. . . 

Work for breed recognised  – Sally Rae:

James Robertson’s lengthy involvement with Holstein Friesian New Zealand has been acknowledged.
The Outram farmer, who is the third generation of his family to belong to the association, was presented with a distinguished service award at HFNZ’s recent annual meeting in Masterton.

Dale Collie, of Carterton, also received the award, which recognises members who have contributed to the Holstein Friesian breed and the association at regional and/or national level. . . 

Bison-beef cattle cross gives beefalo – Allison Beckham:

What do you get when you cross a bison bull with a beef cow? Beefalo.

And a brand new beefalo arrival on Blair and Nadia Wisely’s Southland farm earlier this month is expected to be the start of an all local beefalo blood line.

Despite his unmasculine name, Bobo the bison – the 6 year old shaggy beast weighing 900kg the Wiselys have owned for four years – appears to have proved his parental prowess at last, successfully mating with a 50 50 bison/Charolais cow produced using bison semen imported from the United States. . . 

Truffle time in Christchurch – Ben Irwin:

What do you know about truffles?

Well, like reporter Ben Irwin, most of us probably know next to nothing about the expensive, subterranean fungus.

So Ben, wanting to educate himself and look busy, went searching for what is known as Canterbury’s Black Gold. . .

Survey maps future landscape

Landcare Research is asking farmers, foresters and growers to take part in a survey designed to show what the landscape may look in decades to come.

The survey of Rural Decision Makers was first held in 2013, in conjunction with the Ministry for the Environment. It proved so popular that Landcare Research now conducts it every two years.
The survey’s director, economist Pike Brown, said it focused on what farmers were thinking, rather than figures such as the number of stock they had.
“There’s lots of questions about how farms are managed and how forests are managed, questions about irrigation. . . 

 

 

 

 

 


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