Rural round-up

February 10, 2014

Staff vital part of dairy farm –  Sally Rae:

At Willowview Pastures in North Otago, staff are considered an integral part of the business.

Owners Geoff and Katrina Taylor run the dairy farm on the lower Waitaki Plains near Waitaki Bridge.

Employees were given responsibility for particular on-farm tasks, described by Mr Taylor as their on-farm ”niche”, but still kept up with what was happening farm-wide. . .

Homeopathy and farming; let’s do better, media – Grant Jacobs:

Today Fairfax NZ News published at Stuff.co.nz an article titled, Homeopathy key for dairy farming couple. Unsurprisingly this has been spread to other sites, including pro-homeopathy sites.

Unlike many (most?) articles at Stuff, no means of commenting on this article are available.

Let’s quickly look at key problems in this story.

We might use as inspiration the TED slogan, “ideas worth sharing”, altering it to fit our purposes “information worth sharing”, considering ‘information’ and ‘news’ to be synonymous.

It carries with it a catch: if the information isn’t sound, it’s not worth sharing – not worthy of a place in a newspaper or news website. . .

Welsh shearers learn by competing in NZ – Helena de Reus:

Competing in New Zealand is a chance for Welsh shearers to learn from the best.

Welsh shearing team manager John Davies is touring the country with shearers Gareth Daniel and Richard Jones to contest the four-test Elders Primary Wool series between New Zealand and Wales. The series reached Balclutha at the weekend.

”New Zealand have the best sheep shearers in the world, so it’s good to learn from them and compete against the best.” . . .

Wool titles go far and wide:

Young shearers and woolhandlers fought for three titles at the Otago Shearing and New Zealand Woolhandling Championships in Balclutha yesterday.

The three winners of yesterday’s competition once again hailed from outside Otago, with Erica Reti (Gore) winning the New Zealand junior woolhandler title, Carlton Aranui (Raupunga, Hawkes Bay) winning the Otago junior shearing, and Dylan McGruddy (Masterton) taking the intermediate shearing title.

Two South Island woolhandling circuit titles were also awarded, with Liv Gardner (Southland) winning the junior section and Juliette Lyon (Alexandra) taking the senior. . .

Hort NZ to lobby on labelling:

The national horticulture body says it will continue to keep a close watch on moves by Australian supermarkets to remove New Zealand food products from their shelves, even though nothing has come from political talks on the issue.

The two big supermarket chains in Australia, Coles and Woolworths, are backing the Buy Australian campaign and as part of that, say they’ll stop stocking New Zealand products in their house brands.

Prime Minister John Key raised the issue at a meeting with his Australian counterpart Tony Abbott last week, but was told it was a commercial decision for the supermarkets and did not breach the Closer Economic Relations (CER) free trade agreement between the two countries. . .

Drought roadshow starts:

Farmers in Hawke’s Bay, East Coast and Bay of Plenty – areas still recovering from last year’s drought – will attend a roadshow this week to find out how they can drought-proof their farms.

They’ll hear from Marlborough farmer Doug Avery, who’s been inspiring farmers around the country with the story of how he and his family rescued their farm from collapse after a series of droughts in the 1990s. . .

 


Rural round-up

January 21, 2014

Wild day/night for North Island farmers:

The 6.3 magnitude earthquake, which struck land near to Castlepoint and others near to Eketahuna, has farmers in the Wairarapa and Tararua checking on stock, staff and each other.  These earthquakes come as the remnants of former Tropical Cyclone June approach the upper North Island.

“It’s the best shake we’ve ever had since we moved to Castlepoint Station 15-years ago,” says Anders Crofoot, Federated Farmers National Board member.

“Our house is a bit of a mess.  The pantry has been emptied and we’ve got glass, food and ornaments on the ground.  You could say we’ve been turned into a bit of an installation art form, but it’s the sort of art we could really do without having.

“Right now, I am checking on our staff and heading out to survey the farm. Any damage will likely to be to older water lines, which can easily be severed in a shake like this.  Since its summer the timing’s not ideal,” Mr Crofoot added. . .

Bushfires: rural residents are the solution, not the problem – Nicholas Gill:

The return of heatwaves and bushfires to the news pages has brought fresh warnings that Australians who live in fire-prone zones still don’t fully understand the risk they are running.

Deadly fires in Victoria’s Grampians and the Perth Hills, and the many other emergencies across other states, have once again brought the dangers into stark relief. Yet we have found evidence that people living near bushland are more aware of the risks and remedies than they are given credit for.

Last October’s fires in New South Wales prompted a resurgence of debate about how to safeguard lives and homes. On one side are those who call for landscape-scale fuel-reduction burns, with government-mandated minimum areas to be burned each year. . .

100 colourful years being marked by collie club – Sally Rae:

Central Otago’s Lowburn Collie Dog Club marks a major milestone this week with the holding of its centennial trials on Friday and Saturday.

And in the words of one of its stalwart members, Jack Davis, reaching that achievement is a ”bloody great effort”.

For the club has had a colourful history, including uncertainty over its future because of the construction of the Clyde Dam and raising Lake Dunstan. . .

Fed Farmers meat industry paper challenged:

A meat company head is taking issue with a Federated Farmers paper on options for the meat industry.

The federation released the discussion paper to its members late last year to get feed-back on what sheep and beef farmers believe should be done to make the industry less fragmented and more profitable.

Options include meat industry restructuring through company mergers, and more co-ordinated processing and marketing.

But Tony Egan, managing director of Waikato-based beef processor and exporter Greenlea Premier Meats, said the paper suffered from a one size fits all approach.

It was a good overview of the debate on the future direction of the meat industry but did not recognise that some companies, including his own, were thriving and profitable, he said. . .

Pest trap takes off:

Three Wellington designers started work on a revolutionary pest trap for the Department of Conservation (DOC) nearly a decade ago.

Nine years on and Goodnature’s automatic resetting trap is sold worldwide, including to a zoo in India, a chicken farm in Indonesia and, most recently, the Galapagos Islands.

The company manufactures up to 600 traps a week in its Wellington factory, and has more than doubled its workforce.

It is in talks with distributors in Britain and working with Scandinavian governments on a humane trap for the introduced American mink.

Goodnature director Stu Barr said the gas canister driven traps had come a long way since the first version in 2005.

“The resetting technology is obviously important because that generates efficiency and it also means that the trap is always available. You don’t want to miss an opportunity – if you kill a rat just after sunset and then a stoat comes along at one o’clock in the morning, you want to know that your trap is always ready to do it,” Mr Barr said. . .

Conference focus on top agriculture – Helena de Reus:

Quality agriculture was the focus of 60 teachers at a conference near Balclutha last week.

Telford projects manager Andrew Thompson said 57 teachers from Australia and seven from New Zealand took part in the four-day conference at the Telford campus.

Centred on quality agriculture, the National Association of Agricultural Educators (Australia) annual conference focused on the importance of having a well-trained and educated workforce which used new and innovative technologies. . . .


Rural round-up

January 13, 2014

Inside this hut you see the sky – Sally Rae:

Remote Dansey Pass boasts a hut with all the home comforts. Not only does it have the kitchen sink, it also has the ultimate in hut luxury – a flat-screen television, as Sally Rae reports.

An entry in the visitor’s book says it all.

”Headed back to hut to watch rugby on the new edition. As Neville would say, she’s a bit flash Harry now.”

For as Dansey Pass farmer and prominent dog triallist Neville Hore says, his hut on 4046ha Mt Alexander Station is ”not the ordinary bloody musterers’ hut”.

Not that there is any sibling rivalry, but he did point out that while his big brother Jim’s flash hut over at Stonehenge, in the Maniototo, might boast a double bed, it did not have television. . .

Paper highlights foreign threat to meat industry – Hugh Stringleman:

Another year and another report on the problems of the meat industry.

Federated Farmers Meat and Fibre section has published an options paper by its policy adviser Sarah Crofoot, after circulating it among members and seeking responses.

Section chairwoman Jeanette Maxwell said it was a “pick and mix” of solutions to the complex problems facing the industry.

She wanted to build federation policy by hearing from the members on one of the biggest issues facing New Zealand agriculture. . .

Fonterra’s ‘bigger than this’ – Gerald Piddock Stacey Kirk and Laura Walters:

Court proceedings brought by French food giant Danone were unlikely to cause long-term reputational damage to Fonterra or affect dairy commodity prices, experts say.

Danone has cancelled its supply contract with Fonterra and is launching legal action against the New Zealand dairy co-operative in a bid to win compensation for $492 million of losses incurred last year and reputational damage.

The moves follow a scare in August when Fonterra issued a milk powder contamination warning that later tests found was a false alert. University of Auckland head of marketing, Rod Brodie, said whether Fonterra suffered any long-term reputational damage as a result of the court action would depend on the way the company handled the proceedings. 

“While it will be expensive for Fonterra perhaps in court with litigation, in terms of its end markets I think Fonterra’s bigger than this.” . . .

Changing 30 years of habits to go organic a challenge – Helena de Reus:

Throughout Otago, people with a love of food and fresh produce are turning out amazing products. For some it is just a hobby; for others it has turned into their livelihood. Helena de Reus reports.

A wish to produce nutritious food for people led to the decision of a lifetime for farmer Graham Clarke.

He has farmed near the small South Otago township of Waipahi since 1983, and owns the 1000ha Marama Organic Farm with his partner, Giselle McLachlan, and his brother, Ian.

The sheep farm has been organic for the past eight years, after Mr Clarke heard a talk by a biological farming advocate, and decided the benefits outweighed the challenges. . .

Young adviser challenges farmers:

Sarah Crofoot researched and wrote the meat industry options paper for Federated Farmers quickly after starting employment as a meat, fibre and environment policy adviser last September.

By mid-November her paper was circulated to members of the Feds Meat and Fibre council and it was discussed in a closed session later that month.

The paper has been available to Federated Farmers members since mid-December and an electronic survey of responses conducted.

Crofoot wanted the paper to inform debate about the most important questions facing the New Zealand meat industry and have members help shape the federation policy on industry reform. . .

Scotland’s first bee reserve:

The future of Scotland’s native black bee is looking much brighter

 January 2014: The UK’s first honey bee reserve has been created in Scotland. From 1 January 2014 it has become an offence to keep any other species of honey bee on the Hebridean islands of Colonsay and Oronsay apart from the black bee (Apis mellifera  mellifera).

The black bee is thought to be the only native honey bee in Scotland and the new legislation is designed to protect the species from cross-breeding and disease. . .


Rural round-up

May 29, 2013

Farms’ history recognised – Helena de Reus:

Long-term farmers were praised for their resilience and hard work, at the New Zealand Century Farm and Station Awards in Lawrence on Saturday.

Guest speaker Primary Industries Minister Nathan Guy said his dairy farm at Levin had been in the family for 80 years, and he hoped to return to Lawrence in 20 years to receive a century farm award.

”Our country isn’t that old, and history is important. Tonight is an opportunity to look back at our pioneer farmers.”

The resilience of farming communities and family was on display at the awards, he said. . .

Federated Farmers’ youngest provincial president elected this year:

Federated Farmers Hawke’s Bay has elected 36-year old Will Foley as its new Hawke’s Bay provincial president, replacing Bruce Wills, who will now focus on his role as National President. Will Foley is the youngest provincial president elected in Federated Farmers’ class of 2013.

“I must pay tribute to Bruce Wills, who has positively led Federated Farmers in the Hawke’s Bay,” says Will Foley, Federated Farmers Hawke’s Bay provincial president.

“I guess my election means Bruce will be able to focus on his national role. After being elected Bruce quipped about me, “he is about half my age and with a lot more hair”.

“As a sheep and beef farmer in Waipukurau, you can say I have a strong interest in water given the effect of the current drought has had upon us. . .

It’s time to move – James Houghton:

They say moving house is one of life’s most stressful events, but for sharemilkers it can be an annual occurrence. Not only do they pack up their homes; they move hundreds of animals and farm equipment.

May 31 and/or June 1 are often called “Gypsy Day”, but actually, it is a chaotic week as moving sharemilkers get everything ready to go to a new farm, which could be down the road or in a different part of the country.

Anyone on the move this weekend needs to keep in mind the need to keep stock off greenfeed before transporting to lessen the chance of spilling effluent on the roads, a potential hazard for other motorists and environmental pollutant. . .

Ballance Agri-Nutrients to sponsor Dairy Women’s Network:

Fertiliser company Ballance Agri-Nutrients has confirmed it will be the new prime sponsor of the Dairy Women’s Network from 1 June 2013. The new partnership will significantly boost the Network’s ability to provide more opportunities for dairy farming women to improve their skills and leadership in the business of dairying.

Ballance general manager agro-science and marketing, Liz Muller, said that in farm ownership and partnerships, women are involved in many of the key business decisions.

“It is often women who take the lead role in areas such as farm finances, staff management, animal welfare, safety and on-farm compliance, yet they are under-represented on farmer co-operative boards of directors and industry agencies. Ballance is taking an active role in helping dairying women develop their leadership skills by supporting organisations such as the Dairy Women’s Network, which is focused on developing female leaders. We want to see more women in influential roles contributing to the success and direction of the industry.” . . .

Launch of Seafood New Zealand at Parliament:

New Zealand’s seafood industry body, Seafood New Zealand, will be officially launched at a function, hosted by the Minister for Primary Industries, at Parliament tonight.

“Seafood New Zealand was set up late last year to be more responsive to market and industry changes, following significant consultation with wider industry,” says Eric Barratt, Chair of Seafood New Zealand.

“Less than ten years ago our main export market was the US. Today the focus is on China and north Asian markets that are growing much faster, with the other markets relatively stable. . . .

Children’s Honey From NZ Becoming a Global Success Story:

New Zealand’s oldest honey brand says parents across the world are recognising the health and quality benefits of feeding New Zealand honey to their children.

According to Airborne Honey, New Zealand’s oldest and most trusted honey brand, and one of the country’s largest honey exporters, children’s honey products are becoming increasingly popular both in New Zealand and further afield.

John Smart, Airborne Honey Sales and Marketing Manager, explains that this is largely due to improved education around the health benefits of honey, as well as international confidence in the safety and quality of honey produced in New Zealand. . .


Rural round-up

April 15, 2013

Partnership To Offer Significant Benefits For New Zealand And China Agriculture Industries:

Beijing, China: New Zealand Government-owned AsureQuality and PwC New Zealand have today signed a collaboration framework agreement with China Mengniu Dairy Company Limited and COFCO Corporation to investigate the development of a China New Zealand agribusiness service and Food Safety Centre of Excellence in China.

Initially AsureQuality and PwC will work with Mengniu and COFCO on a dairy-related food safety and farm assurance project. As the partnership evolves it is expected that additional New Zealand commercial and research entities with expertise in other areas of the agricultural sector will be brought in.

AsureQuality’s CEO Mr Michael Thomas and PwC New Zealand’s CEO Mr Bruce Hassall, who signed the agreement in Beijing today, say, “This agreement acknowledges the expertise held by AsureQuality, and the benefits that formal collaboration offers for us, and potentially the wider New Zealand agribusiness sector, in the Chinese market. . .

Sheep production vet’s main interest – Sally Rae:

When people ask vet Dave Robertson what he does in his job, his usual reply is that he ”scans cows and talks about sheep”.

Mr Robertson, a partner at the Veterinary Centre, based in Oamaru, graduated with a degree in veterinary science from Massey University 10 years ago.

He grew up in West Otago, in a family which has a long association with sheep breeding. . .

Returning business manager sees transformation in Southland – Sally Rae:

David Backhurst has seen a lot of changes in Southland since first moving there in the early 1990s and then spending a decade away from the province.

Mr Backhurst has returned to Invercargill to take up the position of general manager of agribusiness and business banking at SBS Bank, after spending the past seven years in Australia.

He was state leader for New South Wales, ACT and Queensland for NAB Health, a specialised banking business launched by the National Australia Bank to service the financial needs of medical practitioners, healthcare and aged-care facilities and investors in the healthcare sector. . .

Deer milk cheese may be world first – Rob Tipa:

Scientists at the University of Otago and Lincoln University and a cheesemaker from Oamaru have produced what they believe may be the world’s first cheese made from the milk of farmed red deer.

What’s more, laboratory tests have identified unique bioactive compounds in red deer milk that they say could improve the immune system of humans.

If that is the case, red deer milk could be worth as much as $100 a litre on niche health food markets and a single red deer hind could potentially produce up to $20,000 worth of milk in a single lactation, according to Dr Alaa El-Din A Bekhit, a senior lecturer in the University of Otago’s Food Science Department. . .

Mill’s expansion plan taking shape – Helena de Reus:

Milton’s historic woollen mill is a hive of activity as its owners shift and replace machinery and plan for its expansion.

Some of the plant’s machinery has been sold, and Bruce Woollen Mill Ltd has spent more than $500,000 on several other machines from Australia to help produce a greater range of products.

Bruce Woollen Mill managing director John Stevens, of Christchurch, said much work had taken place over the past eight months. . .

Smith crowns stellar shears year with NZ Champs win :

Hastings shearer Rowland Smith crowned a stellar couple of months on the competition circuit with a comfortable New Zealand Open Championship win set to a background of drama in Te Kuiti’s packed Waitomo Cultural and Arts Centre on Saturday night.

The win in a six-man final of what should have been 20 sheep each was the 26-year-old Northland-raised gun’s 14th in 11 weeks, including his first Golden Shears Open win in Masterton on March 2.

But there was drama all-around the winner on Stand 3, most-amazingly next-door on Stand 2 where fellow Hawke’s Bay shearer Dion King was wondering how he’d beaten the all-conquering event favourite Smith by more than a sheep and set a record time, until his worst fears were realised. There’d been only 19 sheep in his pen. . .

Farmers praised for role in helping stilt:

High-country farmers have been praised for contributing to a record-breaking season for the endangered kaki (black stilt).

Each year, Department of Conservation staff collect kaki eggs from the wild for incubation at the captive breeding centre at Twizel.

Nearly half of all eggs taken this summer were collected from farmland in the Mackenzie and Waitaki basins with the co-operation of farmers. . .

Farmer of the year –  rivettingKateTaylor:

You are just getting the press release this afternoon…. courtesy of the HB A&P Society – I have been out photographing all day and now I am off to assembly. More later :)

 Night of Winners

Hawke’s Bay’s agribusiness community was out in force last night to celebrate a string of awards that recognise excellence in the primary industries.

350 guests packed the events centre at Showgrounds Hawke’s Bay to enjoy an evening of fine food, entertainment and celebrate with the worthy winners.

The big winners on the night were Danny & Robyn Angland, who took out the prestigious Silver Fern Farms Hawke’s Bay Farmer of the Year title for their management of the iconic Hawke’s Bay farming enterprise Kereru Station.  Danny has been Manager of the 2847ha Station since 2007. . .


Rural round-up

May 20, 2012

Good news for sheep farmers – Sally Rae:

Rabobank animal protein analyst Rebecca Redmond has a message for New Zealand sheep farmers – stay positive and remain confident.   

Ms Redmond spoke about global sheep meat price rises and the potential flow-on effects on international production and  competition during a recent client focus field day at Newhaven Perendales in North Otago.   

The year 2012, worldwide, was probably going to be the lowest point in terms of sheep meat production, but Ms Redmond expected that by 2015, volumes would be back to 2010 levels. . .   

PM says agriculture must focus on quality:

QUALITY agricultural produce coming out of New Zealand is critically important and we have got to maintain that quality and leverage it for all it’s worth, said Prime Minister John Key in his address to Gisborne-Wairoa Federated Farmers’ AGM in Gisborne.

Intensification, the use of new science and technologies to combat global warming and market access are the key ways the government can help NZ farmers meet the  demands of the world rapidly increasing requirement for protein, Mr Key said.

“Both Fonterra and Federated Farmers have clearly understood the need to be mindful of the environmental outcomes from intensification, and how bad outcomes can affect our markets. . .

Vaccines are in his blood – Marg Willimott:

PRODUCING innovative products using sheep and cattle blood is an example of a successful farming business taking farm products to the high end of the value chain.

South Pacific Sera is a company that produces top quality donor animal blood, serum and protein products for use in therapeutic, cell culture, microbiology and immunology applications around the world.  . .

New Zealand and Australia join forces at World Farmers’:

Federated Farmers of New Zealand and the National Farmers’ Federation (NFF) have today announced that they will both apply for membership of international agricultural advocacy body, the World Farmers’ Organisation (WFO).

The WFO will bring together national farming bodies from across the globe to create policy and advocate on behalf of the world’s farmers – providing benefits to both Australian and New Zealand farmers, says NFF President Jock Laurie and Federated Farmers President Bruce Wills.

“Since the demise of the International Federation of Agricultural Producers two years ago, farm representation on an international scale has been at a crossroads,” Mr Wills said. . .

Innovative Kiwi company revolutionises viticulture practices worldwide:

An innovative New Zealand company has developed a pruning system that recently won two major European trade awards and has been described by European media as a revolutionary step in mechanising viticulture that has the potential to change vineyard practices.

Marlborough based KLIMA developed the world’s first Cane Pruner, a machine that cuts, strips and mulches grapevines – jobs that until now have always been carried out by hand.  In addition to giving grape growers better control over vine quality, The KLIMA Cane Pruner reduces labour costs associated with pruning by around 50 per cent. 

KLIMA Managing Director Marcus Wickham says the KLIMA pruning system and machine have proven popular because they take the pain out of pruning, substantially reduce grape growers’ pruning costs and provide a rapid return on their investment. . .

Centuries of farm ownership marked – Helena de Reus:

About 200 people gathered in Lawrence at the New Zealand Century Farm and Station Awards on Saturday night, to honour families who have owned the same farm for a century or more.   

Twenty-five families attended the official function at the Simpson Park complex, with four families receiving  sesquicentennial awards marking 150 years or more of farm ownership.   

Two appointments made to Dairy Women’s Network Board:

The Dairy Women’s Network has appointed two new independent Trustees to join its board – including the first male to join the Board’s ranks since the Network was established in 1998.

The two new voluntary Trustees are Neal Shaw from Ashburton, and Leonie Ward from Wellington. . .

Pastoral Dairy Investments cans public offer:

Pastoral Dairy Investments, a company associated with farm management firm MyFarm, has canned plans for an initial public offering after failing to attract its minimum $25 million subscription.

The company won’t extend its closing offer from today after indications of interest didn’t translate into actual investment, it said in a statement. PDI was offering 25 million shares plus oversubscriptions at $1 apiece, and was also seeking $50 million from high net worth individuals.

“We suspect that this lack of demand is mainly due to general investor caution related to the current uncertain economic climate and a lack of familiarity with dairy farming as an asset class,” spokesman Neil Craig said. . .

Milestone in pasture evaluation to be unveiled:

A rating system for pasture grasses based on economic performance, to be known as the DairyNZ Forage Value Index, will be unveiled to dairy farmers in Hamilton this Thursday [May 24] at the DairyNZ Farmers’ Forum.

The creation of the Forage Value Index is considered a significant and valuable milestone for the future profitability of the dairy industry in New Zealand.

DairyNZ’s Strategy and Investment Leader for Productivity, Dr Bruce Thorrold, will be presenting the new Forage Value Index to the Farmers’ Forum along with the President of NZPBRA (New Zealand Plant Breeding and Research Association) Dr Brian Patchett. . .

NZ producers receive lower prices in 1Q on falling commodity prices, strong dollar:

New Zealand producers were squeezed in the first quarter, receiving lower prices for their products as global commodity prices fell and the kiwi dollar remained strong, while their input prices rose.

The Producers Price Index’s output prices, which measure the price received for locally produced goods and services, fell 0.1 percent in the three months ended March 31, Statistics New Zealand said.

Prices received by food manufacturers fell 1.4 percent in the quarter, leading the decline, due to “lower international prices for meat and dairy products compounded by the appreciating dollar during the period,” Statistics NZ said. . .

Producers’ Price index: March 2012 key facts:

In the March 2012 quarter, compared with the December 2011 quarter:

Prices received by producers (outputs) fell 0.1 percent. • Manufacturing was the key contributor to the fall, with meat and dairy product prices down.
• Sheep, beef, and dairy farming output prices were down. • Electricity and gas supply prices were up 6.9 percent. . .

Prices paid by producers (inputs) rose 0.3 percent. • Higher electricity generator prices were the largest contributor to the inputs PPI. • Food manufacturers paid lower prices for livestock and milk. The manufacturing inputs price index was down 1.2 percent. . .


Rural round-up

May 15, 2011

Devastation on the Hawkes Bay Coast – Karl du Fresne posts:

The coastal strip of Central Hawke’s Bay that was devastated by a freak storm recently is very familiar to me. In my childhood and teenage years, the line of sandy beaches that stretches from Kairakau in the north to Porangahau in the south was something of a summer playground.

One of my earliest memories is of a summer holiday in the shearers’ quarters on the sheep station at Kairakau, which were made available to my family out of gratitude for my father’s work in supervising the building of the electricity transmission line that connected the area to the national grid. Most remote properties on that coast had previously depended on generators.

Frankenmilk – Witty Knitter wrties at SkepticLawyer:

From China, the intriguing news that scientists have genetically modified cows to produce milk with human proteins in it. This is not the same things as genetically modifying cows to ‘produce human milk’, as it has been reported.

To me, this is a truly bizarre story. Presumably, this project was the result of several appalling events that have been reported (and maybe more we haven’t heard about) in which babies have become seriously ill and even died from drinking formulas that their parents believed would be nutritious: here, here and here, for example. This makes the comments of Prof Campbell at the end of the first article linked above (asking why people would put poison into food) a little disingenuous. . .

Prime lambs just shy of $200 – Farmers Weekly reports:

Heavy prime lambs fell just shy of the $200 mark as values lifted up to $4/head at Temuka while store lambs also lifted in the market by $2-$4/head, PGG Wrightson livestock representative Rod Sands reported.
Good heavy lambs made from $158 to $$199 and heavy butcher ewes made up to $220. Forward store lambs fetched up to $125. Bull and beef cow prices rose 10-15c/kgLW.
At Tinwald heavy lambs made $190 and store lambs to $120.
The sheep market caught “lamb fever” at Frankton, Allied Farmers agents reported with prime lambs going to $175. . .

Farm award adds to excellent year: Helen de Reus writes:

Third-generation Hillend farmer Stuart Hallum will receive his New Zealand Century Farm Award at Lawrence tonight.

The 65-year-old farms sheep and cattle at Hillend with his wife, Annette, and is now semi-retired. . .

Passion for trials undimmed – Sally Rae reports fro the South Island dog trails:

Geoff Allison has been dog-trialling for more than half a century and his passion for the sport is still as strong as ever.

Born in South Otago, Mr Allison (67) was 9 when his family shifted to South Canterbury.

He started trialling when he was 15, following in the footsteps of his father. . .

X-factor apparent in dogs’ monikers – Sally Rae again:

 It’s all in a name. Forget the usual dog monikers of Bill, Queen and Jess at the South Island sheep dog trial championships – Greg Metherell has been more creative.

Mr Metherell, from Kenmore Station, at Otekaieke, has a huntaway dog simply called X. . .

Major merger sees birth of $50m animal feed firm – Tim Cronshaw writes:

 A national animal feed business with a starting point revenue of $50 million will arise from major fertiliser co-operative Ballance Agri-Nutrients buying into a partnership with Mid Canterbury and Morrinsville firms.

Ballance will own the majority share with 51 per cent of Seales Winslow with the Carr family’s Winslow Feeds and Nutrition, from Ashburton, holding 24.5 per cent and a similar-sized share taken by feed mill firm Seales Ltd. . .

A place fit for man, beast, frogs and kids – Jon Morgan writes:

When Ray and Lyn Craig entered dairying 20 years ago they wrote a list of goals. At the top, along with a production target long since surpassed, was to own an “aesthetically pleasing” farm.

They have their wish. Their 550-cow farm on the outskirts of Carterton is criss-crossed with streams and drains, all planted with willows, flaxes and a variety of other natives. Three small wetlands have also been created and their flaxes, toetoe and other natives are home to tui, kingfishers, herons and an assortment of ducks.

So impressed were the judges in the Greater Wellington region’s Ballance Farm Environment Awards that they awarded the couple the supreme title and remarked that the riparian plantings were among the best they had seen on a dairy farm. . .


%d bloggers like this: