Rural roundup

February 17, 2019

Hungry cities eat land :

As well as being urged to produce more from less while satisfying environmental critics farmers are also being squeezed by pressure for more land for housing and forestry. This week Farmers Weekly journalists Richard Rennie and Neal Wallace begin taking an in-depth look at how much land has been lost and how much more could still be lost as a billion trees are planted to create a low-carbon economy while another 100,000 homes are built.

As the Government grapples with building another 100,000 homes just to meet shortages, planners and producers are nervously watching continued population growth, much which will be in the country’s key farm produce regions.

Until 2016 New Zealand was losing just over 100,000 hectares a year of growing land, whether to urban development or the proliferation of lifestyle blocks increasing by 5800 a year. . .

Take 5 with Rob Barry  – Tristan Burn:

After an epic adventure around the world, Rob Barry returned to the Central Hawkes Bay four years ago and settled his new family. He is currently working as a Managers Assistant on a 1220 cow dairy farm.

The farm is part of BEL Group, a Family Corporate farming business Rob’s parents built up over the last 30 years. They have nine Dairy farms milking 9500 cows in total and seven dairy support farms (three owned, four leased). Since calving Rob has been block managing Ellingham and 400 cows.

1. In 5-10 words what is your farming philosophy?

Leave it better than you found it – Scouts motto. . .

Seasonal labour shortage in Hawkes Bay declared :

The Ministry of Social Development has declared a seasonal labour shortage across Hawke’s Bay.

Declaring a seasonal labour shortage allows visitor visa holders to apply for a variation of conditions, which will enable them to work on orchards and vineyards in the Hawke’s Bay.

The shortage is for a six-week period between 25 February and 5 April 2019, in response to discussions with pipfruit leaders, industry experts, and the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment. . .

WorkSafe joins Young Farmer of the Year competition:

WorkSafe New Zealand has today announced a partnership with the FMG Young Farmer of the Year competition.

WorkSafe Chief Executive Nicole Rosie says the partnership will connect New Zealand’s future farming leaders with health and safety in an engaging setting, build rapport with rural communities and help create generational change. . .

Pāmu announces increased profit for half year:

Landcorp Farming Limited (known as Pāmu) has declared a net profit after tax of $29 million for the half year ended 31 December 2018. This compares to $21 million for the half year ended 31 December 2017.

Chief Executive Steven Carden said that the increased half year profit was a pleasing result, reflecting good weather conditions and good trade terms for the company’s main products.

“On an EBITDAR (earnings before interest, tax, depreciation, amortisation and revaluations) basis, which we use as a key measure of performance, the half year represented a loss of $3 million compared to a loss of $6 million in the prior period. The loss is largely due to the seasonality of Pāmu’s operations since the bulk of livestock revenue is earned in the second half of the year.” . .

Federated Farmers and Gallagher forge new business relationship :

Long-standing contributor to New Zealand agriculture Gallagher Ltd and Federated Farmers are joining forces to form a new business partnership.

Feds recognises Gallagher as a leader in its field, having more than 80 years’ experience as a leading technology company in the animal management, security and fuel systems industries. . .

Tropical fruit options bring exciting opportunities :

Bananas, so often associated with warm tropical climates on the equator may prove to be another cropping opportunity for enterprising horticulturalists from Northland to Gisborne.

New Zealanders have an appetite for the yellow fruit, chomping through a whopping 18kg per capita a year, about $140 million worth that puts this country at top of the global list for banana consumption. . . .


Greenpeace gets it wrong again

May 5, 2016

Greenpeace had another misguided protest yesterday:

Federated Farmers is surprised at the misguided protest by Greenpeace outside Wellington ACC offices this morning.

“It’s disappointing to see Greenpeace opposing a scheme that has gone through a lengthily process and has stringent environmental conditions attached to it,”says Federated Farmers water spokesperson Chris Allen.

“Greenpeace are demonstrating their anti-irrigation views and seem to oppose anything that gives New Zealand farmers climate resilience.”

Mr Allen says stored water gives communities the opportunity to develop good economic and environmental outcomes and that Greenpeace action is a misguided publicity stunt.

“Greenpeace are barking up the wrong tree with dairy effluent – as those using the stored water will be doing so within strict resource consents conditions that have been through a very rigorous process.”

Mr Allen says that ACC have not been confirmed as an investor for the scheme and that out of 196 farms signed up so far, only one is a new dairy conversion.

Hawkes Bay has good soils and a moderate climate. Add reliable water to the mix and landowners will have lots of options only one of which is dairying.

However, it’s not what farmers do with the water but the impact it will have which matters. Stringent conditions in the irrigation scheme’s resource consent will protect the water and soil whatever is grown with it.

“The rural community will either remain as they are and use the irrigation as a form of resilience against dry periods or introduce some new higher value opportunities of cropping or vegetable products in their systems,” he says.

“The entire Hawkes Bay region will benefit by way of improved access to drinking and stock water to  recreational opportunities. The Tukituki Plan Change six was developed independently of Hawkes Bay Regional Council by a Board of Inquiry and put through various tests of the High Court.”

Federated Farmers would rather see Greenpeace support by advocating to Government the forward thinking opportunities to the TukiTuki region – that reliable water will bring if climate change effects the catchments rainfall.

Greenpeace has got it wrong again. Irrigation used carefully enhances the environment and also bring social and economic benefits.


Rural round-up

October 5, 2015

Equality sets top table of Silver Fern Farm’s joint venture – Fran O’Sullivan:

The Chinese saying “two tigers can’t live on the same mountain” comes to mind when assessing how Shen Wei Ping and Rob Hewett will co-exist as the two chairmen of the newly recapitalised Silver Fern Farms.

Shen is the president of one of four Bright Food listed subsidiaries, Shanghai Maling Aquarius.

Shanghai Maling is a newcomer to the New Zealand commercial scene.

Its sister company Bright Dairy & Food owns a sizeable stake in Canterbury’s Synlait Milk and is widely credited with assisting that firm emerge from the GFC in good order. . . 

Clipping the ticket on NZ’s primary produce :

Shanghai Maling’s offer to take a 5o percent stake in Silver Fern Farms has reignited the debate about foreign investment in New Zealand’s biggest cash cow, agriculture.

Alistair Wilkinson investigates whether NZ is at risk of losing control of its primary produce sector. . . 

Rainstorm cleanup underway – Kate Taylor:

Hawke’s Bay farmers are still counting the cost of a rain storm that killed thousands of lambs two weeks ago.

Most inland areas and some coastal areas recorded between 200mm-400mm of rain with higher country such as Puketitiri, Te Pohue and Nuhaka copping around 500mm.

Farmers who have never used slinky collectors have been on the phone for pickups, said Wallace Corp contractor collector Andy Walsh, Napier. He picked up 4000 lambs from the Puketitiri area in the week following the storm – an area he doesn’t traditionally visit. He picked up 500-600 from one property and was heading back there to pick up another 1100. . . 

Off the dole and into the field – Kerre McIvor:

More than 63,000 fit, capable, work-ready New Zealanders are looking for jobs, so why are we importing workers?

Between 2011 and last year, more than 23,000 Filipinos were granted temporary visas to work on New Zealand farms, because, apparently, there were no Kiwis to do the jobs. Yet Government stats state there are.

I can understand why overseas workers might be brought in to work in industries or professions where years of specialist training is required.

But being a good farm worker requires little more than basic common sense and a willingness to work. And the furore over the faked Filipino work visas proves that. It is believed one in three of the thousands of Filipino farmer workers is here with faked documents. . . .

Beehive crimes plague Northland – Kim Vinnell:

There’s a warning tonight for would-be honey thieves across the North Island – give up now or face the consequences.

Northland is experiencing a spate of beehive crimes, and it’s not being taken lightly.

We can’t tell you where Graham Wilson keeps his bees. That’s because he’s had $18,000-worth of hives stolen, so now he’s not taking any chances.

Mr Wilson has been in the bee game since he left high school 29 years ago. . . 

No luck on natural replacement for 1080 –  Lauren Baker:

Researchers looking for a natural and indigenous replacement for 1080 say it is difficult to come up with a more effective pest-killer.

After an initial shortlist of six plants, a five-year programme focused on the toxin tutin, from the tutu plant, which is known to have poisoned people and killed livestock.

But the results have shown it is not as effective on rats as 1080. . . 

Strong dairy commitment to research and development:

Industry body DairyNZ has confirmed its commitment to investing in dairy science following the release of AgResearch’s proposals for staffing reductions.

DairyNZ’s chief executive Tim Mackle says DairyNZ has continually increased its funding for research and development – because of its importance to the dairy industry.

“Our investment in research and development is unwavering. This year we are funding $18 million worth of scientific research. That is a 1.5 percent increase from last financial year. Farmers tell us it’s a top priority for them. The dairy industry has always had a long and deep commitment to science as the foundation that drives innovation and our competitiveness,” he says. . . 

Merino Kids look for newborns to join their flock!:

The ‘Face of Merino Kids’ competition is back. New Zealand’s favourite sleepbag company are hoping to find the cutest, cuddliest and coolest newborn out there to join their flock and front up their brand new Autumn/ Winter 2016 range.

In the eight years since the competition began Kiwis everywhere have been purchasing, sharing and gifting Go Go Bags and baby wraps with new generations joining their flock every year.

The competition, which launches on the 1st October, will be encouraging Kiwis around the nation to submit their scrummy newborn baby photos and stories via the Merino Kids website for a chance to win a prize pack valued at over $4,000, as well as having their beautiful baby featuring in the Autumn/ Winter 2016 advertising campaign. This will provide a fantastic opportunity to capture some timeless family photos of your loved ones also. In true Kiwi spirit the team at Merino Kids will also be providing a special thank you gift to each entrant for their ongoing support! . . .


20-19

September 1, 2013

Hawkes Bay 20 – Otago 19.

Congratulations Alwyn, an electronic bottle of wine of your choice awaits you.


Mr Brown’s boys

September 1, 2013

The Otago rugby team  and the Ranfurly shield they won were welcomed back to Dunedin last week by a crowd of 1000 and a banner reading: “Welcome Home, Mr Brown’s Boys”.

The province has celebrated but coach Tony Brown and the team have been focussed on something more important than celebrating the win – retaining the shield.

. . . There is no point giving up the trophy in week one after having waited more than 20,000 days to have it. The first week has been a great ride and no-one wants to jump off so quickly. . .

Forsyth Barr Stadium has been renamed Tony Brown’s place for the occasion.

We were at Carisbrook when it was dubbed Tony Brown’s place for a Super 12 final in 1999.

Unfortunately the Highlanders weren’t able to beat the Crusaders that day.

All my fingers and toes are crossed that the party at Tony Brown’s place this afternoon when Otago defends the shield against the Hawkes Bay Magpies, has a much happier outcome.

Go Otaaaago!

P.S.

Alwyn and I have a bottle of Otago or Hawkes Bay wine of the winner’s choice on the results. I’m happy to accept the same wager from others who doubt Otago.


Rural round-up

May 7, 2013

Fixed price contracts not priority for most meat companies – Marie Taylor:

As debate on the state of the red-meat sector continues, Marie Taylor asked 12 meat processors what they had to offer farmers in terms of stable pricing they could bank on.

Fixed-price contracts are few and far between in the meat industry.

The New Zealand Farmers Weekly surveyed 12 meat companies in New Zealand to find out what was on offer in terms of predictable, stable pricing farmers could bank on.

The most encouraging responses came from Silver Fern Farms, Ovation, Progressive Meats, Lean Meats and Firstlight Foods. . .

New animal welfare strategy released:

Minister for Primary Industries Nathan Guy has launched the New Zealand Animal Welfare Strategy today, setting out a high level framework for how we treat animals.

“The strategy Animal Welfare Matters sets out a formal foundation for New Zealand’s animal welfare legislation and policy,” says Mr Guy.

“It says that it matters how animals are treated, and that we have responsibilities toward animals. It also says that using animals for activities like farming and racing is acceptable as long as it is humane.”

The strategy lists four main routes to improved animal welfare: . . .

Federated Farmers back new animal welfare strategy:

Federated Farmers is fully supporting the release of the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) Animal Welfare Strategy.

“The strategy reflects Federated Farmers own policy on animal welfare,” says Bruce Wills, Federated Farmers President.

“It really does matter how animals are treated and farmers have both a moral and ethical responsibility to ensure requirements are adhered to.

“New Zealand’s farmers are actually world leaders in integrating animal health and welfare into their farm management planning. Something recognised by the World Society for the Protection of Animals (WSPA).

“This strategy reaffirms our international leadership and reputation. It is a strategic means to ensure this reputation is not only maintained but improved and Federated Farmers supports it. . .

Word of Hawke’s Bay Wines Spreading In China:

Hawke’s Bay wines, in particular high quality reds, are steadily gaining exposure in the expansive Chinese market with two recent initiatives adding to the awareness. 

Four influential Chinese media writers visited the region and were hosted by Hawke’s Bay Winegrowers and five wineries, while four local wineries attended one of China’s most important international wine trade fairs, the Chengdu Wine & Spirits Fair.

Immediately after her visit, Sophie Liu, an independent wine writer and educator, has blogged positively about her time in Hawke’s Bay and is planning articles to appear in Wine World, Wine & Taste and World Cuisine magazines, as well as http://www.wines-info.com

Her colleague Fan Yiren, who is one of China’s most influential social bloggers with accumulated fans of 63,374,307 on one site and over 330,000 on Weibo (Chinese Facebook equivalent), blogged daily. He is also planning to write four to five feature blogs. . .

At home and overseas, New Zealand seafood is on the dinner table:

When fish is on the menu, the type of fish you get can depend heavily on where you live.

Salmon, tarakihi, and gurnard are the most-commonly available fish species in supermarkets and fish shops as tracked in the consumers price index (CPI), Statistics NZ said today. However, some species are not widely available in all regions.

“Snapper and trevally are generally available in shops from Nelson northwards, but barely feature further south where sole is more commonly available,” prices manager Chris Pike said.

New Zealand’s seafood industry, published today by Statistics NZ, gives an economic overview of selected parts of the country’s seafood industry and provides a comparison between 2007 and 2012. . .

Trials show there’s a lot to love about molasses:

A further round of farm trials in the Waikato has reconfirmed the value of Crystalyx Dry Cow dehydrated molasses blocks as a Dry Cow winter management tool.

The results were shared at a farm open day in Putaruru, in March, with Jackie Aveling, Animal Nutrition Manager at Altum, saying the good turnout reflected farmers’ interest.

“Overseas trials over some 20 years have consistently confirmed the performance of dehydrated molasses blocks. Farmers want to know if the same results can be achieved in New Zealand. Our trial work with Crystalyx, which is specifically formulated for local conditions, gives them the facts they need to support its performance.”

The repeated trial work done by Dr Mark Oliver, science director of the Liggins Institute’s Ngapouri Farm research station near Rotorua, which saw a control herd supplemented with magnesium and trace elements following current best practice guidelines, and the other Crystalyx Dry Cow. . .

Organic Farm Pioneers High-tech Voluntary Milking System:

Robotic or voluntary milking systems, where the cows choose for themselves when they want to be milked and the whole job is done by a computerised machine, are still as rare as tits on a bull in New Zealand.

Heritage Farm, a certified organic dairy farm at Karaka, just south of Auckland, was the first farm in New Zealand to install a DeLaval Voluntary Milking System.

Early adopters David and Cathy Yates, who own and run Heritage Farm with their son Brian, are really pleased with their move to computerised milking. They have now had two and a half year’s experience with the system and say that its benefits go way beyond not having to spend hours in the milking shed every day putting on and taking off teat cups. They include improved animal health and welfare, and better pasture and feed management – all made possible by the quantity and quality of the data that the system provides, along with doing the manual work of milking. . .


NZ beetroot beats Aussie’s

February 17, 2013

Hawke’s Bay growers are defending the quality of their beetroot against claims from Dick Smith that Australian beetroot is better:

Hawke’s Bay growers have struck back at claims from Australian millionaire Dick Smith that our beetroot is “poor quality”.

Heinz Australia has threatened to sue Mr Smith, who it says made a false claim on the label of his Smith’s Magnificent Sliced Beetroot on sale in Australia.

The label says: “When American-owned Heinz decided to move its beetroot processing facility from Australia to New Zealand causing hundreds of lost jobs, we decided enough is enough.

“So we are fighting back against poor quality imported product.”

Hawke’s Bay grower Mark Apatu said the claims are bogus.

“Our beetroot is fantastic,” he said.

“We’ve been growing beetroot for 35 years.

“Our quality and yield is world class and our flavours are magnificent.”

This is an underhand – or should that be under arm? – campaign which Heinz says is factually incorrect.

Heinz Australia corporate affairs manager Andrew Hewett said the company took exception to the inflammatory nature of the comments and had threatened to sue, which Mr Smith was using to gain free publicity.

“Heinz believes that the statements were either incorrect or misleading,” Mr Hewett said.

“We found it unfortunate that in order to try and promote sales of his own products, Dick Smith felt the need to reference other brands in the market rather than relying on the attributes of his own products.”

Heinz sent a letter to Mr Smith, pointing out its concerns, which Mr Smith made public.

“In an effort to effectively gain free advertising for his own products, Dick Smith chose to forward a private letter to the media. Heinz stands by the decisions it made in relation to the manufacture of beetroot and also the quality of its products.

“We take pride in the quality of our products, and our support of Australian manufacturing, employing more than 1200 people Australia-wide.

“We will continue to view this as a private matter between Heinz and Dick Smith and treat it accordingly.

“We are not interested in furthering Dick Smith’s efforts to gain publicity and therefore will refrain from making any further comments,” Mr Hewett said.

Buy local is an old marketing plea which appeals to consumers’ parochialism but isn’t always in their best interests.

There are lots of arguments for buying local but being local doesn’t  guarantee better quality or lower prices, on the contrary it sometimes means lower quality and higher prices.


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