Rural round-up

August 2, 2017

Survey shows big jump in number of farms making a profit:

A few weeks of winter remain but the Federated Farmers July Farm Confidence Survey shows there’s a spring in the step of those who work the land.

The responses to Research First from nearly 800 farmers show the highest level of confidence in current general economic conditions since 2014. Dairy and arable farmers are the most optimistic looking forward and all regions are demonstrating more optimism compared to the last survey, in January this year. . . 

Milk testing for tankers to stop cattle disease spread – Alexa Cook:

Bulk milk tests will be done on tankers across the country to see if the cattle disease outbreak has spread any further than South Canterbury.

The disease, mycoplasma bovis, has been found on two separate properties owned by the Van Leeuwen Dairy Group in South Canterbury, who have 16 farms in the region.

Ministry for Primary Industries’ Director of Response Geoff Gwyn said it had decided to do a national bulk milk survey. . .

Protesters block Canterbury irrigation project:

Greenpeace protesters have locked themselves to construction equipment to try to block the construction of a multi-million dollar irrigation scheme in central Canterbury.

The second stage of building the Central Plains Water (CPW) scheme began in May. The scheme is intended to irrigate 60,000 hectares of dairy, horticulture and stock between the Rakaia and Waimakariri Rivers. . .

Captive workforce for hort sector – Pam Tipa:

A pilot scheme helping ex-prisoners and other offenders to find work in the horticulture industry is succeeding and will be expanded, says Corrections Minister Louise Upston.

Corrections and Horticulture NZ have seen the first year of a pilot scheme succeed in Hawkes Bay and now plan to expand it into Bay of Plenty. It trains prisoners to be work-ready for employers and sets up horticulture work opportunities for their release.

“Corrections appreciates the support and leadership of the horticulture sector, which is helping change the lives of offenders and giving new hope to their families,” Upston says. . . .

Medium scale adverse event declared for Otago flooding:

Primary Industries Minister Nathan Guy has today officially classified the flooding in Otago as a medium-scale event for Dunedin City, Clutha District, Waitaki District and Central Otago District.

“This is recognition of the damage caused and the challenges faced by the region, and triggers additional Government support,” says Mr Guy. . .

Flood hit Otago farmers appreciate Government assistance:

Federated Farmers applauds the Government’s decision to declare a medium scale adverse event in flooded parts of Otago.

The region was hit by extensive flooding last month with many paddocks especially on the Taieri Plains still under water and reports that supplementary feed has been lost to raging flood waters.

“Farmers are still doing it tough so this should bring some light to the end of the tunnel in what has been a grim week as the extent of damage has become clear,” says Federated Farmers’ Otago Provincial President Phill Hunt. . .

Greenpeace report dies a death by qualification – Doug Edmeades:

 Greenpeace recently released a report entitled Sick of Too Many Cows. In summary, it claims that intensive dairy is endangering our health and ipso facto the Government should stop all the proposed irrigation schemes and that the dairy industry should adopt a new ecological model.

Federated Farmers called it “sensational rhetoric”. Another commentator, Allan Emerson, described it as: “……. hysterical, unfounded allegations by a lunatic fringe group desperate for donations”. Amanda Larsson, a Greenpeace campaigner, retorted that such criticism was cavalier, adding, “I’m happy to have a conversation about the science. Examination and interrogation is central to the scientific process.”

Let’s take her at her word and do a little “examination and interrogation”. . . 

Hawke’s Bay Winegrowers appoint new Executive Director:

Hawke’s Bay Winegrowers is pleased to announce the contracted appointment of Liz Read to the role of Executive Director for the next twelve months.

Liz runs her own consultancy called Reputation Matters, helping organisations to grow, maintain and save their reputation. She advises clients on stakeholder relations, issues and risk management, communications strategy and sustainability strategy. Her clients span the public and private sectors, industry organisations, not-for-profits and social enterprises. Liz’s corporate experience included ten years as External Relations Director for Lion New Zealand.  . . 


Rural round-up

September 14, 2012

“Healthy bastards” outlive hard ones – Laura Richards:

Men are not meant to die earlier than women, but they do, according to Doctor Dave Baldwin. Men live four years less than women, on average, he said.

“They have higher rates of suicide, heart disease and cancer.”

Known as the Bulls Flying Doctor throughout the country, Dr Baldwin was the keynote speaker at this year’s final Beef + Lamb New Zealand, Manawatu Finishing Farm seminar series held in Feilding.

While the message of “How to be a healthy bastard – a farmer’s guide” was more geared to the men in the audience, everyone enjoyed the politically incorrect chuckles along the way. . .

Kangaroo meat healthier: foodies:

CHEFS and nutritionists are hopping on the kangaroo train, urging diners to eat roo meat for its health benefits.

Executive chef John Lawson, from Mr Hive restaurant, says Australia should embrace roo on the menu.

There needs to be more marketing around kangaroos and how to cook them,” he said.

“People have avoided roo because of the perception it is a wild animal so it is tough and lean, but they cultivate them now so they do have more fat on them.”

Nutritionist Lola Berry said it was great for losing weight . . .

Lavender oils award success out of the blue – Sally Rae:

When Barry and Jo Todd entered their lavender oil in the New Zealand Lavender Growers Association’s awards, they wanted    to ascertain the quality of their oil.   

The first-time entrants were “totally gobsmacked” to win the Ken Wilson Memorial Trophy and the Eoin Johnson Memorial Cup  for the best grosso and best lavandin oil respectively, along with a silver award.   

Mr and Mrs Todd own a boutique lavender farm, Danseys Pass Lavender, in the remote Danseys Pass in North Otago. . .

Decision to Enter Ballance Farm Environment Awards Pays Off:

Frank Portegys almost didn’t enter the Waikato Ballance Farm Environment Awards because he felt his family-owned dairy farm wasn’t ready.

He can see the irony in this because as a former fertiliser and dairy farm consultant he’d often encouraged other people to enter in the past. He’d even been a judge for the competition.

“So I’ve heard the excuses about the farm not being ready. I’ve always wanted to enter the Awards but we are only in our fifth season here and our riparian plantings are in the very early stages, so I was a little hesitant at the start.” . . .

Best Sauvignon Blanc in the World and a Trio of Trophies for Yealands Estate at the International Wine Challenge

Yealands Estate has collected a trio of trophies at the International Wine Challenge Awards ceremony held in London last night.

In addition to the International Sauvignon Blanc and the White Marlborough trophy, Yealands Estate Single Block S1 Sauvignon Blanc 2011 was also awarded the 2012 James Roger Trophy. . . .

Bay’s wine website now with Chinese subtitles

As more Hawke’s Bay wineries move to tempt the growing number of Chinese wine drinkers, the region’s wine organisation is gearing up to support them with an updated website that features Chinese translation of both copy and videos.

Hawke’s Bay Winegrowers Inc., executive officer Lyn Bevin reports there are 26 local wineries now exporting to China, up from 18 late last year. . .


%d bloggers like this: