Was Pooh Bear a romantic?

February 15, 2011

Discussion with Noelle McCarthy on Critical Mass began with the Last Post on Stoatspring in which Anne Else, his widow, gave the news of his death.

In response to that she is now using her blog, Elsewoman, to write about learning to live by herself for the first time in her life.

Still on the subject of love we looked at the 10 most romantic lines in English Literature.

Emily Bronte penned the winning words: ” Whatever our souls are made of, his and mine are the same” in Wuthering Heights.

A.A. Milne’s Pooh Bear (or was it Christopher Robin to Pooh?) was voted second with:  “If you live to be a hundred, I want to live to be a hundred minus one day so I never have to live without you” .

If you find this to sugary, pop across to Today Is My Birthday for Ally’s amusing reaction to the romance.


Reading Janet Frame

January 12, 2011

This Tuesday’s Poem is Reading Janet Frame by Harvey McQueen, which is part of a tribute to the poet who died on Christmas Day by Mary McCallum who also posted Harvey McQueen RIP on her own blog.

Other tributes from Tuesday poets include:

After the Disaster chosen by Helen Lowe

Tribute to Harvey McQueen by Helen Rickerby at Winged Ink

Harvey McQueen 1934-2010 – an appreciation by Jeffrey Paparoa Holman

Farewell to Harvey McQueen by Saradha Koirala

Tuesday poem to remember Harvey McQueen That Selfsame Song by Thomas Hardy, from Mariana Isara


Death of a poet and blogger

January 4, 2011

Stoatspring was a relatively recent addition to my list of regular blog reads (thanks to a recommendation from Deborah).

I enjoyed the mix of poetry, philosophy and general ruminations on many topics including gardening,  food, current affairs and life.

 He started blogging because he had inclusion body myositis, a rare muscular degenerative disease which made him increasingly disabled but still able to type.

He was open about the condition, it’s impact and frustrations but never self-pitying.

I was very sorry to read the last post, written by his wife Anne Else, follow Harvey’s death on Christmas Day.

A couple of weeks ago I bought his last book, These I Have Loved, my favourite New Zealand poems. It is a fitting legacy for a man with such a fine appreciation for good writing who wrote so well himself.


Why Do We Do What We Do?

December 21, 2010

This Tuesday’s poem is Why Do We Do What We Do by James Brown.

Sarah Jane Barnett who is this week’s editor paired the Tuesday Poets in a poetic version of  ”Secret Santa”  to post a poem or other offering by their ‘partner’ poet.

The results are linked in the sidebar and include:

How She Holds Her Head by Mary McCallum

Grapefruit by Clare Beynon

Cake With Fruit by Therese Clear

Christmas Baubles from Northland by Elizabeth Welsh

The Middle Ground by Belinda Hollyer

Elizabeth and Mary by Kathleen Jones

Kitchen Sonnets by Catherine Fitchett

Albedo by Harvey Malloy

Unnoticed by Harvey McQueen

countadowncountdownAuckland Countdown by Renee Liang

Xmas by Susan Landry

Christ in Aotearoa by Andrew Bell

Nerves by Sarah Jane Barnett

Burning With Joan of Arc by Helen Rickerby

Christmastide by Helen Lowe

Barksoup Winter by Jennifer Compton


Cow Poem

November 16, 2010

Tuesday’s poem goes rural this week with Cow Poem by Chris Mansell.

Other Tuesday poems with links in the sidebar include:

Under the Influence by Mary McCallum.

A Manner of Speaking by Clare Beynon.

Rudyard Kipling’s Smuggler’s Song at An Affliction of Poetry took me back to primary school:

If you wake at midnight, and hear a horse’s feet,
Don’t go drawing back the blind, or looking in the street,
Them that ask no questions isn’t told a lie.
Watch the wall my darling while the Gentlemen go by.
Five and twenty ponies,
Trotting through the dark –
Brandy for the Parson, ‘Baccy for the Clerk.
Laces for a lady; letters for a spy,
Watch the wall my darling while the Gentlemen go by!  . .

Then there’s two which are both sad and powerful:

Vesper Sparrow’s How I died and Harvey McQueen’s Life Sentence.


Truths

November 3, 2010

This Tuesday’s poem is Truths by Helen Heath.

Alicia Ponder who selected it says:

On the surface it is straighforward, but underneath it has an elegance and grace that is quite breathtaking.  I could wax lyrical, but that is hardly necessary as the poem speaks for itself. It stands alone, a beautiful truth, as rare as any jewel,. . .

It is. I’ve read it six times since coming across it on Tuesday and each time I find something more in it.

Among the links to other Tuesday poets in the sidebar are:

if it be your will by Leonard Cohen at Type What You See.

Beyond Silence by Saradha Koirala at Lalialand.

What You Take With You by Mary Mcallum.

Rural Delivery by Vivienne Plumb at Winged Ink.

The Pensioner by Harvey McQueen.


Ode to Chocolate

October 29, 2010

This Tuesday’s Poem is the delicious Ode to Chocolate by Barbara Crooker.

Tow other Tuesday poets who celebrated food:

Harvey McQueen with To Autumn by Ian Wedde.

Clare Beynon with her own Doris Plum.


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