Rural round-up

April 4, 2017

New research will help address rural communities’ health and wellbeing:

New research on farm-related suicide and the factors behind it is a progressive step and will enable a more concerted focus on reducing rates, says Federated Farmers.

The study by Dr Annette Beautrais was conducted on behalf of the Rural Health Alliance Aotearoa New Zealand and funded by AgResearch.

As inaugural members of RHANZ, Federated Farmers has advocated for many years for an increased awareness on addressing issues related to rural health and wellbeing.

In her findings, Dr Beautrais reveals that general farm workers and males are the most vulnerable and more likely to take their own life. . . 

Zespri calls in police over cross-border kiwifruit transfer – Paul McBeth

 (BusinessDesk) – Zespri International has called in police to investigate the transfer of Gold3 and Gold9 kiwifruit varieties into China that may have been done illegally.

Last year the Mount Maunganui-based international fruit marketer started investigating reports that a kiwifruit licence had been sold to a third party, breaching the terms limiting transfers within a country, and it passed on that evidence to police in December which is investigating, it said in a statement.

“The purported sale of a licence from one jurisdiction to another by a third party is a breach of Zespri’s licences and plant variety rights, and potentially could give rise to allegations of fraud or misleading conduct,” Zespri said. “In this case, Zespri suspects . . 

Primary sector women funded to step up:

Government investment in developing and supporting women to create sustainable prosperity in the primary sector and regional communities has been welcomed by the organisation that is growing the leadership, governance and business skills of women in the sector.

The Agri-Women’s Development Trust (AWDT) has received $289,000 from the Government’s Sustainable Farming Fund to extend its work to three groups of women who have been identified as part of the key to sustainable primary industry growth.

The two-year project will see AWDT research, design and deliver pilot programmes for younger women who are entering primary sector careers, Māori women in the regions, and women who have had careers outside of primary industries whose expertise was of value. . . 

More RMA stress and cost for farmers in Horizons region:

Federated Farmers is deeply disappointed by a legal decision which suggests the Horizons Regional Council has not implemented the One Plan correctly and environmental gains are not being made.

The court decision announced today is now being carefully reviewed by Feds, so we can begin to understand the on-the-ground implications for our member farmers.

Federated Farmers Manawatu/Rangitikei provincial president James Stewart says we have to remember the enormous amount of good work and investment undertaken by farmers across the region to comply with the ‘One Plan’ regulations and that the plan’s objectives are being achieved.

“The council has worked very hard to implement a One Plan that’s workable and that does not put farmers out of business and improves water quality as needed. . . 

Research provides new guidance for West Coast farmers on pests:

AgResearch scientists are set to present new guidance to West Coast farmers on dealing with some of the region’s worst pests after years of in-depth research alongside locals.

Over the past three years farmers in the West Coast Pest Management Group have taken part in a project funded by the Ministry for Primary Industries’ Sustainable Farming Fund to improve the understanding of pests that threaten pastures.

“This research is about providing farmers on the South Island’s West Coast with the tools to tackle these pests, before the long-term damage is done to their pastures and bottom lines,” says AgResearch Senior Scientist Sarah Mansfield. . . 

New Zealand farming couple grow record-breaking wheat crop:

Huge crop confirmed by Guinness World Records

• Bayer and Yara play key role

• Increasing yields key focus

Ashburton farmers Eric and Maxine Watson have entered the renowned book of Guinness World Records after producing the world’s highest yielding crop of wheat.

The couple produced a staggering 16.791 tonnes per hectare, beating the previous record of 16.519 tonnes held for two years by a UK farmer.

On average, irrigated wheat yields in New Zealand are around 12 tonnes per hectare, demonstrating how remarkable the new record is. . . 

Successful meeting with Lithuanian Agricultural Minister:

New Zealand Primary Industries Minister Nathan Guy and Lithuanian Agriculture Minister Bronius Markauskas met on Monday in Vilnius, Lithuania to discuss a range of agricultural issues in each country. 

“Clearly, there are many similarities between our countries, including the role of dairy in our respective economies,” says Mr Guy. 

“New Zealand is an example for Lithuania,” says Lithuanian Minister of Agriculture B. Markauskas

“We are quite similar – in both countries the dairy industry and agriculture in general play a huge role. I was in New Zealand previously and I was impressed by the great atmosphere and the relationship between the government and farmers, as well as the country’s agricultural potential. . . 

  Fonterra makes a splash at China’s food ingredients show:

Fonterra’s NZMP dairy ingredients business has made a splash at China’s largest food ingredients trade show in Shanghai, launching three dairy ingredients and bringing New Zealand’s dairy story to life for customers through a 360° immersive virtual reality experience.

One of the world’s foremost food ingredients events, the three-day Food Ingredients China 2017 event attracted more than 100,000 customers from all over the world.

Fonterra announced the launch of NZMP Gold Whole Milk Powder for UHT, NZMP Tasty Cheese Powder and NZMP Butter Concentrate products at the event. . .

 

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If you think it’s expensive to hire a quality farmers, just wait until you hire a crappy one.


Rural round-up

September 4, 2015

Farmers not sidestepping health and safety reform – Katie Milne:

The Health and Safety Reform Bill has grabbed many recent headlines because of what is deemed a high risk industry – and what is not.

Because most farming industries fall on the low-risk side, many people seem to have rushed to a judgement that farmers are excluded from these reforms.

This is simply not the case.

The reforms are designed to improve the safety of every industry and every workplace. Farms included.

What’s more, the bill passed by Parliament last week is welcomed by Federated Farmers for the very reason it will further help our members to address the high level of workplace incidents and fatalities on our farms. . . 

Survey shows banks have stepped up to the plate during dairy downturn:

Banks are providing much needed support to New Zealand’s dairy industry during this period of desperately low prices, a survey from Federated Farmers has revealed. 

Only 6.6% of dairy farmers say they have come under undue pressure from banks over their mortgage. Just 5.7% are dissatisfied with banks over their mortgages and as little as 3.1% are unhappy about the quality of communication from banks over the past three months. 

Across all farming industries the level of dissatisfaction over mortgages is even less (5.2%), with 5.5% saying they have come under undue pressure in this area and 3.5% unhappy with how banks are communicating with them.

The survey was conducted the week following Fonterra’s announcement on 7 August of a forecast payout to farmers of $3.85 per kilogram of milk solids, and Federated Farmers President Dr William Rolleston says the organisation took the step because it was vital the industry knew exactly what level of support it was receiving.  . . 

Canola grower all in favour of friendly rivalry – Sally Rae:

Competition is hotting up globally in the world of canola and even Guinness World Records is finally excited.

A few years ago, North Otago arable farmer Chris Dennison approached Guinness World Records (GWR) and suggested a new category for the crop, as a lot of canola was grown in the world and there was interest in achieving high yields. . . 

What other EU governments are doing to help their farmers – Amy Forde:

Fed-up Irish dairy, grain and pig farmers took to the streets of Dublin recently to protest about the low prices they are receiving for their produce and low farm incomes.

It is an EU-wide problem and next week there will be an extraordinary meeting of EU agriculture ministers in Brussels.

The ministers will debate the state of play in EU markets as weak prices in a number of sectors is leading to increased farmer unrest across the continent. . . 

Orchard’s Innovation Recognised in Greater Wellington Ballance Farm Environment Awards:

Entering the Greater Wellington Ballance Farm Environment Awards for the second time proved well worthwhile for pipfruit operation JR’s Orchard Ltd.

Owners JR Van Vliet and Jamiee Burns first entered in 2009 and were thrilled to win the Innovation award for the clever way they installed crop protection netting on the 117ha orchard (92ha planted) on the eastern edge of Greytown.

“We found the awards to be a wonderful experience,” says Jamiee.

“We learnt so much, and it made us re-evaluate some of the processes we were using in the operation.” . . .

Klein's Agri Services's photo.

Butchery sizzles competition to take out bacon award:

Butcheries in Christchurch and Auckland have taken out the country’s top awards for bacon and ham.

The 100% NZ Bacon & Ham Competition celebrates turning New Zealand grown pork into bacon and ham products.

Cashmere Cuisine in Christchurch won bacon of the year and Westmere Butchery in Auckland won ham of the year. . . 


Rural round-up

May 1, 2015

 

2015 Employee Remuneration survey shows farming salaries holding firm in spite of tough conditions:

Federated Farmers and Rabobank’s 2015 employee remuneration report shows farm employee remuneration is rising despite tough industry conditions.

Salaries across the industry groups generally were equal at entry level, though some dairy farming employees, such as dairy farm managers, had higher salaries compared with their sheep and beef counterparts.

Federated Farmers Dairy Industry Group Chair, Andrew Hoggard, said it had been a fairly unfavourable year for farming all round, especially in the dairy industry, with returns down 40 per cent. . .

 Farmers back a pioneering environmental restoration project:

Hawke’s Bay farmers are getting in behind a New Zealand first environmental restoration project, which has just been launched in Napier.

The Cape to City project is a world-leading programme, which will aim to achieve a predator free Hawke’s Bay. It will focus on ultra low-cost, large-scale predator control across 26,000 ha of farmland between Waimarama and Havelock North with the aim to restore native species and plants and add value for farm businesses.

The project represents a significant investment over five years for both Cape to City, and sister project Poutiri Ao ō Tāne, of more than $6 million and is a collaborative partnership between Hawke’s Bay Regional Council, the Department of Conservation, Landcare Research, Cape Sanctuary and the Aotearoa Foundation as well as private business and other Crown Research Institutes. . .

Sustainable textile company The Formary to represent New Zealand at the World Exposition 2015:

Launching world–first Mibu® yarn blended from wool and rice straw.

“Transforming industrial and agricultural waste into beautiful fabrics” is the mantra of New Zealand company The Formary.

Back in 2010, they made global headlines when they collaborated with Starbucks and developed WoJo®, an award–winning fabric combining New Zealand wool with coffee sack waste fibre.

On May 1st they launch their latest innovation, Mibu yarn, on the biggest stage on the planet: the World Exposition 2015 in Milan. . .

Timaru farmers claims barley world record for New Zealand:

The Exclusive Grain Group has confirmed Timaru farmers Warren and Joy Darling are now the Guinness World Records® (GWR) holders for the highest barley yield. The world record attempt took place on Friday 23 January 2015 and was ratified by GWR on Wednesday 15 April 2015 with a yield of 13.8 metric tonnes per hectare with the Blackman Agriculture bred variety 776.

With the barley world record unbroken for 25 years, the three month verification wait from GWR was long and stressful. “There was absolutely no doubt that we had achieved the 13.8 metric tonnes of yield and we had followed the GWR protocol independently assessed by SGS here in New Zealand,” said Warren Darling. “It was like being back in school knowing you had done really well on a test but until you receive the final mark, it is an anxious time,”
he commented. . .

barley

 

 

 

Smart ties with India:

Lincoln University has strengthened its ties with business in India after signing Memoranda of Understanding with ETI Dynamics and JCurve Ventures which emphasise the development ‘smart cities’.

The agreements come after a recent visit by an Indian trade delegation to the University, which was hosted by Vice-Chancellor Dr Andrew West, Deputy Vice-Chancellor International and Business Development Jeremy Baker, and Peter Barrowclough, Chief Executive Officer of Lincoln Agritech Ltd, a 100 per cent owned subsidiary of Lincoln University. . .

Find Your Next Success at NZB’s Upcoming Sale:

A prosperous season among New Zealand’s juvenile ranks has brought New Zealand Bloodstock’s National Weanling, Broodmare & Mixed Bloodstock to the fore ready for the next crop of youngsters to be sold at the upcoming Sale in May.

This year’s $1m Karaka Million winner Hardline (NZ (Showcasing) is a star graduate of the 2013 National Weanling Sale. Purchased by Hallmark Stud for $43,000 from Haunui Stud’s draft, Hardline returned at the 2014 Karaka Select Sale where Australian trainer Liam Birchley secured him for $130,000. . .

 


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