Rural round-up

December 27, 2018

Leave the water rules to locals – Neal wallace:

When water arrived in Maniototo 34 years ago it not only transformed the region’s dryland farms but also Geoff Crutchley’s views on water management.

Crutchley was initially reluctant to become involved in the murky world of water and irrigation management but was prodded into action in response to what he considered inflated water prices being demanded by the precursor to the Maniototo Irrigation Company.

So began an involvement that continues today but which has challenged some of his previous views while shaping others.

His experience has formed views on three issues in particular. . . 

Wilding pine effort set to triple – Jono Edwards:

The attack effort on Otago’s wilding pines seems set to treble.

Over the past year, $1.8 million was spent controlling 332,000ha in the region through the Ministry of Primary Industry-led wilding conifer control programme.

At a recent Otago Regional Council meeting, chief executive Sarah Gardner said she was told by ministry staff the work would soon triple.

This was echoed by the Central Otago Wilding Conifer Control Group.

Ministry Wilding Conifer Programme manager Sherman Smith said phase one was 85% complete and planning for the second phase was under way. . . 

Improving farm performance – one effluent pond at a time – Jim van der Poel:

As a dairy farmer, I take great pride in looking after my farm – its animals, the grass under their feet, our team and how we protect the environment. Every aspect contributes to a successful business.

So, like many farmers, I am disappointed when a few let down the majority. There have been some instances this year of poor effluent compliance, despite many farmers doing great work in this space.

All dairy farmers have a responsibility to manage the effluent from their cows and it is taken seriously by the vast majority who are investing in reliable, sustainable farm systems. . . 

Ex-director suggests Fonterra suspends dividends – Sudesh Kissun:

A former Fonterra director says the co-op could suspend dividends to shore up its balance sheet rather than sell key assets.

Greg Gent says farmers and investors would understand if the co-op suspended dividends to get its books in better shape. And it could suspend dividends and sell some assets that don’t align with its new strategy.

However, he wants to see the co-op’s strategy before decisions are made on selling assets. . . 

The Good, the Bad and the Ugly of 2018 – Jamie Mackay:

The Country radio host Jamie Mackay takes a look at the highs and lows for rural New Zealand in 2018.

The Good:

The weather:

This time last year much of the country was in a screaming drought – a farmer’s worst nightmare. Although Mother Nature absolutely forgot to turn the tap off in November and early December, at least once we dry out there will be grass for Africa and for more than quite a few sheep, cattle and deer.

Mycoplasma bovis:

Twelve months ago many were resigned to living and farming with bovis. If a week’s a long time in politics, a year is an eternity in farming. I wouldn’t be so bold as to suggest bovis is beaten but we’ve given it a hell of fright in 2018. . . 

Bird veteran still has pluck – Alan Williams:

The glamorous part of the year is over for long-time poultry exhibitor Doug Bain.

After several months of winter and spring shows around the South Island with a lot of ribbons and accolades it is back to the real work of breeding hens and ducks for next year.

“You need to have a reason to get up in the morning. It’s a hobby for me,” the 82-year-old says.

He doesn’t keep count of the birds he breeds and has no preferences. 

“I like them all.” . . 

 


Fonterra hasn’t got message

May 24, 2016

Fonterra was sent a message last year when more than 50% of shareholders supported the remit put forward by Colin Armer and Greg Gent to cut the number of board members from 13 to nine.

Unfortunately the remit didn’t get the 75% support it needed and the board didn’t get the message.

It did come up with a proposal to drop a couple of directors but it is also proposing a more convoluted and less democratic method of selecting them which  Keith Woodford sees this as a Trojan horse:

Many farmers have been convinced by the call from former directors Colin Armer and Greg Gent that reducing the number of directors would be a step forward, and it aligns with a widely held view that something at Fonterra needs to change. But reducing director numbers in itself will achieve nothing of substance.

The reason that the proposal is a Trojan horse is that it lets in a revised director selection process that is fundamentally non democratic, and which take power away from farmer members.

Fonterra itself is a business with assets of $19 billion and equity of $7 billion. However, beneath this there are another set of land and cow assets that are owned by farmers that are worth – even at today’s discounted rates – more than $60 billion, with more than $30 billion of this is now owed to the banks. Why would farmers want to release their direct say in governance by relinquishing the power to select their directors?

It is now explicit as to how the director nomination and selection process will be managed. This process is complex with multiple steps, and effectively keeps farmer shareholders well away from the selection process. . . 

The board will select candidates. Shareholders will  be able to vote for them or, in what will in effect be a vote of no confidence in the board – against them.

Although the proposed process itself is now explicit, the operation thereof will be clouded in secrecy.

The only way for farmer shareholders to influence the choice of directors will be by rejecting the Boards own nominations. And then the process of finding an alternative director goes back behind closed doors.

The new proposal, if accepted by farmers, will in the long term do more to alienate members than any event since Fonterra’s formation. The danger is, that with farmers currently distracted by more immediate issues of cash flow and survival, the proposals will pass at the vote on June 10, simply because many farmers will have not engaged with the key issues.

The required approval of 75% of farmer votes is a stiff target. But it is feasible that it could be achieved off a low turnout. This is particularly the case if the larger corporate-type farmers vote in favour.

One has to ask, what has led the current Board to endorse these proposals. The support within the Board is supposedly unanimous, but is that simply because of ‘cabinet solidarity’?

We know that in the past a divided Board has chosen to present a united front under pressure from the majority. It would be interesting to see each Board member stand up and explain why he or she is supporting the change.

As a starting point, the proposal uses a common approach to choose both farmer and non-farmer directors, and in the process ignores the differences in situation.

Non-farmer directors are meant to be chosen for specific skill sets that are otherwise missing in the overall Board. This is best achieved by a private and confidential search, followed by tapping the desired people on the shoulder. Democracy is not the way to get the right people to fill those specific roles.

Under the revised proposals, it will be the nomination and selection committees that seek out both these non-farmer and also the farmer directors, but then the selected nominees will have to sell themselves to a series of public farmer meetings. Most potential non-farmer directors with the relevant expertise have a range of alternative options, and they will feel little need to allow their names to go forward into such a process. That is not the way these people operate.

As for the farmer directors, the claim is that it will reduce the internal politics. In terms of double speak I am reminded of George Orwell’s 1984.

The new proposed system will be totally closed door until just before final acceptance or rejection of nominees by farmers. It will depend on the nomination and selection committees, dominated by existing Fonterra Board-think plus nominated independent non-farmer business people, and where those with new or provocative thinking will struggle to get a guernsey.

The proposed process of director selection is highly complex with multiple stages.
First there will be a nominating committee of two Fonterra farmer directors and two non-farmer directors. There will also be two Shareholders Council observers on this Committee. . . 

Woodford describes the process then says:

Actually, there are comparable analogies from elsewhere. They are called communist party elections. Essentially, this is the process they follow of selection and then public endorsement and ‘election’ of the chosen ‘selected’ candidates.

There are multiple problems at Fonterra, and some of these are a consequence of bad historical decisions going back many years. They have come from weaknesses in leadership and weaknesses in diversity of thinking. I have written previously about those on multiple occasions.

However, none of the current proposals solve any of Fonterra’s current weaknesses. These proposals simply throw out the baby with the bathwater.

Hopefully, enough Fonterra farmers will clear their minds of current distractions to recognise that this is not the path forward.

Fonterra faces several challenges, none of which will be helped by the convoluted and anti-democratic procedure the board is proposing for director elections.

Thirteen is at least four people too many for an efficient and effective board.

Dropping a couple of farmer directors and having the rest selected in the secretive method proposed is not in the best interests of the co-operative or its shareholders.


Bigger not better for boards

November 26, 2015

Fonterra has acknowledged change in its governance and representation is needed after more than half its shareholders voted for a smaller board:

. . .A total of 53.8 percent of shareholders voted in favour of the resolution put forward by former directors Colin Armer and Greg Gent to cut the board size from 13 to nine directors but it required 75 percent support to get it across the line under the cooperative’s constitution. It also needed support from 50 percent of shareholder councillors.

The resolution was opposed by the board and Shareholders’ Council, who both said a governance review already under way was a better option. Shareholders have been told the review will see an information booklet sent to them early next year, farmer consultations in February, and a May/June vote at a special extraordinary meeting. . . 

The board must deliver on the review:

The proposal to reduce the size of the Fonterra board is one the company can no longer ignore say its proponents, Greg Gent and Colin Armer.

The proposal failed to meet the 75 per cent support required to change the constitution but the level of support is a massive message to the board they say.

“The Trading Amongst Farmers proposal got 66 per cent support with millions spent so we are thrilled with the support we have received.

“Something has to happen now,” said Colin Armer. “The whole thing disappeared three years ago but there is nowhere for the board to hide now.”

“This is a huge success for us,” said Greg Gent. “We had little resources and the company worked hard against us.”

Mr Armer said the big loser in this debate was the Shareholders’ Council.

“The shareholders’ council has been found wanting and totally misread farmers’ views on the subject,” he said. “Their criticism of our proposal was absurd.

“The resurrection of the governance review after three years was a last minute jack-up between the Council and the board which had only one purpose – to defeat our proposal,” said Mr Armer.

He said that the governance review is still inadequate.

“This upcoming review needs independence, experience, and farmer input into its Terms of Reference,” he said. “Right now shareholders don’t know the terms of reference and the review is being conducted by a group that lacks the experience or independence needed to make sure we get the right structures into the future.”

Mr Gent said that he and Mr Armer had achieved what they wanted to.

“While we’d love to have got our proposal over the 75 per cent line we always knew that it was a huge mountain to climb,” he said. “The company has far better resources than us to communicate with its 10,000 shareholders.”

In spite of the result the pair are confident that the governance review will not be shelved for another three years. However they are not so sure that the review will result in a smaller board of directors.

“We will need to wait and see about that,” said Mr Armer. . . 

Bigger isn’t usually better for boards.

I am on one with 10 members and meetings always work better when at least a couple are absent.

That isn’t a reflection on the absentees, it’s not who isn’t there but that having fewer round the table almost always results in a more efficient and productive meeting.

Fonterra is a big company but it doesn’t need 13 directors to function well and would work better with fewer.


Rural round-up

November 12, 2015

Fonterra’s silent majority hold key to shareholder vote on number of directors:

Fonterra shareholders who want to send a message to their company have been encouraged to support the proposal to reduce the number of directors on the company’s board.

Colin Armer and Greg Gent, the two former directors behind the proposal, say that shareholders are the only people who own the company’s constitution and the only people who have the right to change it.

Mr Gent said he wanted to encourage those who do not normally vote to do so this time. . . 

Improving resource base key to sustainable growth:

Improving the quality of our natural resources is the key to sustaining economic growth in our primary sectors right across regional New Zealand, says Economic Development Minister Steven Joyce and Primary Industries Minister Nathan Guy.

Ministers Joyce and Guy today launched the updated Building Natural Resources chapter of the Business Growth Agenda with an emphasis on lifting primary sector productivity while improving our environmental outcomes at the same time.

“Our natural resources are central to achieving growth and more jobs in New Zealand’s economy, especially our regional economies. We are committed to using new scientific techniques and innovations, alongside infrastructure developments in information technology and water storage, to achieve both productivity gains and environmental gains,” says Mr Joyce. . . 

NZ’s primary sector leaders of tomorrow still bank on brand Kiwi, want deeper debate on GMOs – Jonathan Underhill:

(BusinessDesk) – New Zealand’s emerging agri-business leaders say affluent consumers in 2035 will pay a premium for products sold with a strong provenance story and that are more tailored to their needs, according to KPMG’s Agribusiness Agenda 2015.

The accounting firm asked a range of primary sector organisations to nominate emerging leaders and more than 50 of them – scientists, company executives, farmers, government officials and marketers – met for a summit in Auckland in September and were asked to share their vision for the sector in 2035. They were also surveyed on their priorities and the results compared to a separate poll of current leaders. . . 

RBNZ asks banks to stress test dairy loans, confident they can weather downturn – Paul McBeth:

(BusinessDesk) – New Zealand’s major lenders are able to cope with a protracted downturn in the dairy sector, which the Reserve Bank estimates could cause credit losses of as much as 18 percent over a four-year period.

The central bank has requested the five biggest lenders to the dairy sector – ASB Bank, ANZ Bank New Zealand, Bank of New Zealand, Westpac New Zealand and Rabobank New Zealand – to stress test their portfolios, which the Reserve Bank sees as a growing risk to the health of the nation’s financial stability. The regulator was encouraged by “realistic provisions” set aside for the portfolios, and its modelling suggests a sustained downturn would be manageable for the wider system. . . 

Dairy farming not fanning Indonesian forest fires:

Federated Farmers echoes the concerns of Greenpeace and others regarding the devastation and environmental impact of forest fires that have burned for more than three weeks across Indonesia, but says the use of Palm Kernel Expeller (PKE) as a supplementary feed source for dairy cows is not to blame.

“It’s important to remember that PKE is not the reason for these fires or tropical deforestation. It is a by-product of the extraction of palm oil and palm kernel oil which would otherwise be treated as waste,’ says Federated Farmers Dairy Industry Chair Andrew Hoggard.

“Dairy farmers are taking this waste product and making use of it as a supplementary food source, used mainly as an alternative to pasture during adverse weather such as droughts, to maintain the welfare of herds and the productivity of New Zealand’s vitally important dairy industry.” . . 

Panning for Pink Gold: Fonterra Expands Capacity in High-Value Lactoferrin:

It takes 10,000 litres of milk and incredibly sophisticated technology to make just one kilogram of lactoferrin – a high-value ingredient that Fonterra has recently doubled its capacity to produce.

The new $11 million upgrade of the lactoferrin plant at the Co-operative’s Hautapu site is now running at full volume, helping to meet growing worldwide demand for the product affectionately known as ‘pink gold’.

Lactoferrin is a naturally occurring iron-binding protein found in milk and is in high demand, particularly in Asia, for a wide range of nutritional applications from infant formula through to health foods and yoghurts. . . 

Enter Dairy Industry Awards and go on holiday:

Those that enter the 2016 New Zealand Dairy Industry Awards can win a holiday of their choosing – so long as they enter soon.

Entries in the 2016 New Zealand Share Farmer of the Year, Dairy Manager of the Year and Dairy Trainee of the Year competitions are now being accepted online at www.dairyindustryawards.co.nzand close on November 30.

Those that enter by midnight on November 20* will go into the Early Bird Entry Prize Draw and be in with a chance to win a share of $12,000 in travel vouchers and spending money. . . 


Rural round-up

November 11, 2015

Push for Fonterra board cut takes to road

The board of New Zealand’s biggest company is not the place to learn how to be a director, says an advocate of cutting Fonterra’s board size to improve performance.

Former Fonterra director Colin Armer told about 30 farmer-shareholders at Tatuanui, Waikato that the Fonterra board should not be a “training ground” for “junior directors”. 

Aspiring farmer directors needed to come to the board having had commercial governance experience “outside – not through the (Fonterra) shareholders’ council”, said the large-scale dairying businessman.

Armer and former Fonterra deputy chairman Greg Gent are meeting shareholders who want to hear more about their call for voter support at this month’s Fonterra annual meeting for their resolution to reduce board members from 13 to nine. . . 

Drone technology makes mustering easy in North Otago – Daisy Hudson:

A North Otago couple have taken to the skies with a revolutionary new method of herding stock on their Kurow farm.

Janina and Justin Slee are using a drone to muster hard-to-reach cattle on their property near Mount Domett, and the technology has revolutionised the way they operate their farm.

After hearing about the drone at a show in Wanaka about six months ago, the couple decided to bite the bullet and try the technology on their own farm. . . 

Conservation ‘cornerstone’ of tourism – Stacey Bryant:

Southern tourism operator Real Journeys won a Conservation Week Award for protecting the kakapo and whio (blue duck) and also ridding the Walter Peak area of wilding pines and restoring land. Commercial director talks to Stacey Bryant.

What is it about conservation work that got your company interested and continues to interest it?

In the 61 years that Real Journeys has been operating, conservation work has always interested us.

Real Journeys founder Les Hutchins made the now famous quote (back in 1998): ”Today I am more convinced than ever before that conservation is the real cornerstone of New Zealand’s tourism industry. Tourism and conservation need each other for mutual survival and the right direction to go is to take more notice of conservation issues, not less.” . . .

Making it sexy – David Anderson:

The Government has set a target to increase the value of New Zealand’s food sector exports from $25 billion to $60b, meaning there will be an additional 50,000 jobs in the primary sector by 2025.

What must we do to encourage NZ’s best and brightest to look to the primary sector for a career?

According to John Brackenridge, the head of Merino New Zealand and the leader of the chief executives’ agri-bootcamp scheme that takes industry high-flyers to the United States, the current messaging aimed at attracting young people into the agri sector is unappealing and the wrong people are involved in that messaging. . . .

Get ready for the big dry:

Vets are encouraging farmers to prepare for a dry summer and to figure out how best to manage livestock through this time.

The NZ Veterinary Association (NZVA) says forecasters are predicting that the already strong El Nino conditions of spring 2015 will continue over summer and into autumn 2016 and it could rank amongst the four strongest El Nino events recorded along with 1972-73, 1982-83 and 1997-98.

“During El Nino NZ tends to experience stronger or more frequent winds from the west in summer, leading to drier conditions in the north and east, and more rain in the west,” it warns. . . 

What Indonesia wants – Melissa Aisthorpe:

INDONESIA’S growing demand for food imports holds much opportunity for Australian exporters beyond the cattle industry.

The real value of agrifood consumption in Indonesia is projected to quadruple between 2009 and 2050, on the back of expected sustained economic growth, population increase and continued urbanisation.

That’s according to a new report, What Indonesia wants: Analysis of Indonesia’s food demand to 2050 from the Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics and Science (ABARES). The report is set to be discussed at the 19th Indonesia–Australia Working Group on Agriculture, Food and Forestry Cooperation this week. . .

 


Rural round-up

October 14, 2015

Shareholders seek board changes for leaner, fitter Fonterra:

Two Fonterra shareholders and former Fonterra board members are calling on Fonterra shareholders to reduce the number of directors in a move to improve the company’s performance.

The two, Greg Gent and Colin Armer, have put forward a notice of proposal to the company’s annual meeting in late November seeking shareholder support for a reduction of board members from 13 to nine.

“We all want our cooperative to be more globally competitive and successful with a clear strategy to achieve that. Our farming businesses and livelihoods depend on that,” says Greg Gent who was formerly deputy chairman of the company. . . 

Forest & Bird congratulates New Zealand police on 1080 arrest:

Forest & Bird congratulates the New Zealand police for making an arrest as part of their investigation into a 1080 threat to infant formula late last year.

“This threat wasn’t just a challenge for our dairy industry and exports, it also had the potential to damage our ability to control introduced predators that are killing our native wildlife” explained Kevin Hackwell, Group Manager of Campaigns and Advocacy at Forest & Bird.

“We absolutely support the continued use of 1080 in New Zealand’s forests. It’s the most sensible, cost-effective way to reduce pest numbers and allow native forests and wildlife to thrive” said Mr Hackwell. . .

Alliance Group to offer farmers loyalty payments – Gerard Hutching:

Alliance Group will offer loyalty payments this season to farmer shareholders in what some observers are saying are the first shots in a procurement war.

The offer comes with the caveat that farmers have to supply 100 per cent of all their livestock or 100 per cent of one species.

The reward for farmers supplying 100 per cent of their lambs is an additional 10c per kilogram per animal.

Chief executive David Surveyor said the co-operative was forecasting $100 for an 18kg lamb for the 2015-2016 season. . . 

Farmers and growers hope to avoid another drought – Gerard Hutching:

Some South Canterbury farmers and growers are shying away from being dependent on Lake Opuha water and are putting in their own bores.

Jo and Steve Malone, who own Redwood Cherries and Berries on the Pleasant Point Highway, lost thousands of dollars during this year’s disastrous drought.

“We are going to drill for water because we don’t want to be reliant on the lake. We are waiting for the council to give us consent,” Jo Malone said.

They were not as big users of water as dairy farms. Their cherries had not received irrigated water for the last five years, but it was vital for the strawberries. . . 

Grain payments spell risky business – Alisha Fogden:

MAKING seven-day payment terms standard was a contentious topic in the managing market risk session at the recent Australian Grain Industry Conference in Melbourne.

Grain Trade Australia chief executive officer Geoff Honey, who was guest speaker, said that could potentially reduce competition.

“There are organisations that buy grain from you that sell it to an end-user that is on a 30-day end-of-week delivery,” he said.

“If it became seven-days EOW standard across everybody, you could be removing a layer of competition. . . 

A cure for vitamin B6 deficiency :

In many tropical countries, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa, cassava is one of the most important staple foods. People eat the starchy storage roots but also the leaves as a vegetable. Both have to be cooked first to remove the toxic cyanide compounds that cassava produces.

But the roots have a disadvantage: although rich in calories, in general they contain only few vitamins. Vitamin B6 in particular is present in only small amounts, and a person for whom cassava is a staple food would have to eat about 1.3 kg of it every day for a sufficient amount of this vital vitamin.

Serious deficiency in Africa

Vitamin B6 deficiency is prevalent in several African regions where cassava is often the only staple food people’s diet. Diseases of the cardiovascular and nervous systems as well as are associated with vitamin B6 deficiency.

Plant scientists at ETH Zurich and the University of Geneva have therefore set out to find a way to increase vitamin B6 production in the roots and leaves of the cassava plant. This could prevent vitamin B6 deficiency among people who consume mostly cassava. . . 


Rural round-up

August 10, 2015

Fonterra must evolve – Hugh Stringleman:

Fonterra’s structure must keep evolving, as farmers’ own businesses change through time, former founding director Greg Gent believes.

However, nothing in its structure was preventing farmers from getting the maximum available returns from world dairy markets in the downturn.

As big as it is, Fonterra could not control the milk price.

Fonterra remains silent on dividend impact – Eye to the Long Run:

The staggering hit to milk payouts – around 27% – is also a staggering reduction in the input costs to every product for which milk is an input.

The “model” is supposed to generate returns to suppliers of milk solids and returns to investors (and the two are one in the same for the majority) on sales of processed product. The reduction in input cost must by now be cumulatively very significant. . .

Fonterra overshoot on 2015 advance payment worsens 2016 farmer cash flows – Paul McBeth:

 (BusinessDesk) – Milk prices have dropped so dramatically that Fonterra Cooperative Group effectively overpaid farmers under an advance payments scheme last year, sapping funds available to pay out farmers at the end of the season and leaving them short of cash even before last week’s deep cut to the 2016 forecast payout.

“Last year, Fonterra came out with a higher advance rate schedule during the year, effectively almost overpaying for milk as they went,” Dairy Holdings chief executive Colin Glass told BusinessDesk. “That meant there was nothing left at the end of the year to come through. That’s effectively been the major impact on farm cash flows today.

“Those deferred payments for the previous year haven’t been there and that’s coinciding with what is now the lower advance rate schedule.” . .

 

Hard work and sacrifice reap stellar success – Kate Taylor:

A determination to buy their own farms has seen a set of siblings grow their businesses from 7000 stock units to about 37,000 in 14 years.

One of the partners, Bart and Nukuhia (Nuku) Hadfield, went on to win the 2015 Ahuwhenua Trophy – the BNZ Maori Excellence in Farming Award (sheep and beef).

In 2001 they had pooled resources with Nuku’s siblings – Eugene, Ronald and Marama – and their partners to lease Mangaroa Station in the Ruakituri Valley and neighbouring Ruakaka Station in Tiniroto. . .

El Niño explained as simply as possible – Weather Watch:

It’s been talked about for almost two years in the global scientific community and now it’s finally showing up on weather stations here in New Zealand – El Nino, the weather/climate event that often causes great concern in the rural sector.

But should be we concerned ?  Short answer – yes, somewhat – long answer, yes, but let’s not get carried away, NZ can buck the international trends and we are still not 100% sure how this will all pan out over summer. 

So saying things like “This El Nino will be worse than the drought creating one of the 1990s” is a bit like saying a newly developing tropical low is going to hurt NZ more than Bola did.  But until it fully forms and until we really get a good feeling as to how it’s going to impact New Zealand, then we need to take a deep breath and not talk about extreme worst case scenarios as if they are locked in with certainty…because we simply don’t know this early.  . .

Blair draws a line on farm trespass – Robyn Ainsworth:

TRESPASSERS will definitely be prosecuted under strict new penalties to be introduced to state parliament under the proposed Biosecurity Bill, industry stakeholders heard this week.

The penalties are one plank of the government’s NSW Farm Incursions Policy being rolled out, which NSW Primary Industries Minister Niall Blair (pictured) hopes will be extended nationwide to protect farmers and crack down on the illegal practices of animal welfare activists and others who trespass on farms. . .

 MyFarm share trading shifts to Syndex – Syndex launches offering investors the opportunity to trade farm and orchard shares:

Syndex, the online investment trading platform, has launched today offering investors the opportunity to buy and sell shares in farms and orchards.

Farm investment company, MyFarm, is the inaugural partner for Syndex’s Agri Syndicate Market.

Syndex will allow people to buy and sell shares in MyFarm’s dairy and kiwifruit investment opportunities. It opened today with shares available for purchase in a new Bay of Plenty kiwifruit syndicate and an established Canterbury dairy farm. . .

Will a red hot beef market cool anytime soon? –  Texas Farm Bureau:

The cattle market the last two years is like August weather in Texas. Red hot!

More than 1,680 beef cattle producers gathered at Texas A&M to hear the latest about the cattle market and future trends at the 61st Texas A&M Beef Cattle Short Course, held this week in College Station.

“I think there is a lot to look forward to down the road,” said Dr. Jason Cleere, conference coordinator and Texas A&M AgriLife beef cattle specialist. . .


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