Rural round-up

November 20, 2015

Aquaculture and red meat producers share South Island’s top agricultural prize:

For the first time ever, the prestigious Lincoln University Foundation’s South Island Farmer of the Year competition has been awarded to two entrants, with a North Otago red meat producer and a Marlborough green-lipped mussel grower sharing the top prize.

Announcing the unexpected result at the finals this evening at Lincoln University, the competition’s chief judge Nicky Hyslop told the audience that the judges were unable to separate the two top performers, Richard and Annabelle Subtil of Omarama Station, and Marlborough’s Clearwater Mussels (John Young Managing Director).

Clearwater Mussels is a greenshell mussel producer with 90 mussel farms ranging from 2.5 to 80 hectares supplying a variety of food and pharmaceutical markets.

Primarily a sheep and beef property with some smaller scale hydro and tourism operations, Omarama Station also has scientific reserves and Department of Conservation and QEII Trust covenants on the property. . . 

Fonterra exits Dairy Farmers of America joint venture, retains supply deal – Paul McBeth:

(BusinessDesk) – Fonterra Cooperative Group, the world’s biggest dairy exporter, plans to sell its stake in the DairiConcepts ingredients joint venture with Dairy Farmers of America for some $196 million, after deciding it didn’t fit the company’s strategy.

The Auckland-based cooperative will sell its 50 percent stake in DairiConcepts to partner DFA on Dec. 31, ending a 15-year venture where Fonterra contributed key ingredients to the US dairy and cheese flavours business, while the American cooperative supplied a number of cheese and cheese-powder assets, it said in a statement. Fonterra signed a long-term supply agreement as part of the sale. . . .

Regions benefiting from rural broadband:

Connectivity is growing rapidly in the regions with more New Zealanders than ever before now able to access faster rural broadband, Communications Minister Amy Adams says.

The latest quarterly report for phase one of the Rural Broadband Initiative (RBI) build as at 30 September 2015 shows 271,000 rural addresses can connect to the network.

“With 35.6 per cent uptake across the network, RBI is making sure that New Zealanders living in our rural and remote areas can enjoy the benefits of faster, better internet,” Ms Adams says.

“The RBI is making a genuine difference to farmers, schools, hospitals and health centres in rural areas as well as families and households.” . .  .

Pacific urged to invest more in Agriculture:

The Secretariat of the Pacific Community is encouraging governments in the region to put more emphasis on developing their agricultural sectors.

The team leader of SPC’s Pacific agriculture policy project Vili Caniogo says more than 80 percent of the region’s people live in rural areas but this is not reflected in government policies. . . 

Wool lifts:

New Zealand Wool Services International Limited’s C.E.O, Mr John Dawson reports that a slightly easier New Zealand dollar and limited wool volumes combined with steadier enquiry, saw most categories well supported.

Of the 5,700 bales on offer, 92 percent sold.

The weighted indicator for the main trading currencies compared to last sale weakened 0.94 percent, helping underpin local prices. . . 

Old school ties to historic home on the market for sale:

A historic home converted from a country school that comes complete with rugby posts and a swimming pool, and boasts an Olympian among its former students, has been placed on the market for sale.

The former site of Richmond Downs School is located in Walton, 15km from Matamata. For more than 80 years it served the community, with former students including Olympian hurdler Lynette Massey. Due to dwindling numbers, the school closed in 2004. . . 

Leading South Island cucumber growing operation for sale is pick of the bunch:

A successful Canterbury horticultural operation, which is the leading supplier of telegraph cucumbers in the South Island has been placed on the market for sale.

Located at 38 Madeleys Road in Clarkville, North Canterbury, the property combines an established telegraph cucumber business and four-bedroom dwelling on 4.05 hectares. It has been placed on the market for sale as a going concern with Bayleys Canterbury, via a deadline sale closing on November 26, unless sold prior. . . 


Rural round-up

April 3, 2015

New Zealand Greenshell mussel breeding begins at brand new hatchery in Nelson

New Zealand aquaculture will be getting stronger mussels, thanks to some heavyweight Kiwi science underway in Nelson.

A new hatchery and lab facility is opening today (02/04) just north of the city at the Cawthron Aquaculture Park where Greenshell™ Mussels can be selectively bred like sheep or cattle to give our mussel farmers the very best that nature has to offer on their mussel farms.

The project leaders say it takes the element of chance out of mussel farming. . .

 

New hatchery to boost mussel industry:

Primary Industries Minister Nathan Guy has welcomed a major milestone for the aquaculture industry today with the opening of the country’s first ever hatchery specially designed for mussels.

The mussel hatchery and nursery facility in Nelson is part of the SPATnz Primary Growth Partnership (PGP) programme, which was established to develop selectively bred, high-value Greenshell™ mussels.

“This hatchery is the culmination of years of research and development by a team of scientists from Shellfish Production and Technology New Zealand Ltd (SPATnz) and the Cawthron Institute,” says Mr Guy.  . .

“It has the potential to generate nearly 200 million dollars per year to New Zealand’s economy. . .

Wasps sting NZ economy:

Two species of introduced wasps are costing New Zealand’s economy more than $130 million a year.

A study by the Department of Conservation and the Ministry for Primary Industries showed German and common wasps, which belong to the genus Vespula, have had huge economic impacts on farming, beekeeping, horticulture and forestry.

Department of Conservation scientist Eric Edwards said the loss of honey production was one of the major costs. . .

NZ’s “basketcase” bee industry seeks levies, national body – Suze Metherell:

(BusinessDesk) – Representatives of New Zealand’s fragmented bee industry have called on government support to reintroduce commodity levies for honey and the creation of a single national body by April next year.

Appearing before the primary production select committee, John Hartnell, chair of the Federated Farmers Bee Industry Group, Ricki Leahy, president of the National Beekeepers Association and its chief executive Daniel Paul, said government support is needed to reimpose commodity levies to help fund a single, comprehensive national association to represent the industry worth an estimated $5.1 billion annually. . .

New beagle pups join biosecurity team:

Two wriggly beagle puppies will spend their first Easter as trainee biosecurity detector dogs.

Ten-week-old Charleston and Roxy (brother and sister) joined the Ministry for Primary Industries’ detector dog programme two week ago.

If all goes well, they will start sniffing out food and plant materials at New Zealand’s airports and ports after 12-14 months of training. . .

Low dairy prices may have silver lining:

While all dairy farmers will be feeling the financial crunch this year, some are still looking for a silver lining.

Federated Farmers’ sharemilking chair Neil Filer said it could provide an opening for young sharemilkers to get their foot in the door.

Prices fell by 10.8 percent in last night’s GlobalDairyTrade auction, with an average price of $US2746 a tonne. Whole milk powder fell 13.3 percent to $US2538.

Mr Filer said sharemilking was still seen as an attractive and viable industry and at times like this, there could be a positive side. . .

 

Infant formula marketing decision welcomed:

The Infant Nutrition Council (INC) welcomes the Commerce Commission confirmation of the authorisation of the INC’s Code of Practice for marketing infant formula.

The Code of Practice restricts the advertising and marketing of infant formula by members.

It has been in place since 2012 and is consistent with New Zealand’s commitment to the World Health Organisation’s International Code of Marketing of Breast Milk Substitutes (WHO Code). . .

 

Fonterra Notifies Affirmation of Credit Rating:

Fonterra Co-operative Group Ltd is pleased to advise that it has been notified by Standard & Poor’s Ratings Services that they have affirmed Fonterra’s credit rating. This affirmation follows the release of Standard & Poor’s rating criteria for agricultural co-operatives which applies to Fonterra. . .


Rural round-up

December 11, 2014

Wellington decision makers get the facts on irrigation:

“Highlighting New Zealand’s international excellence in irrigation practice to urban audiences and dispelling myths is key to getting greater acceptance of water storage and irrigation throughout the country,” said Andrew Curtis, CEO of IrrigationNZ at a breakfast of over 70 politicians, industry and business representatives and NGOs in Wellington this morning.

The breakfast meeting was arranged by the national body representing irrigators and the irrigation industry, IrrigationNZ, as part of its efforts to educate New Zealanders about water storage and irrigation and to emphasise the link to food production.

In his opening remarks, Minister for Primary Industries Hon Nathan Guy congratulated IrrigationNZ for bringing together the capital city’s key decision-makers to learn about the irrigation industry. . .

 

Reduced milk payout challenge to farmers, but recovery likely to commence in 2015-16 – Rabobank:

While the reduced milk price forecast means New Zealand dairy farmers will face significant challenges in the coming 12 to 18 months, the medium to longer-term outlook for dairy remains sound, agribusiness banking specialist Rabobank said today.

Commenting on today’s announcement that Fonterra has further cut its farmgate milk price forecast for 2014/15, Rabobank New Zealand CEO Ben Russell said while the challenges New Zealand dairy farmers would have to deal with in the immediate term were “acute”, farmers should have confidence in the medium and longer-term outlook for dairy, with Rabobank expecting a price recovery to commence during the 2015-16 season. . .

 

Small towns face dairy payout pain:

Small towns which service the dairy sector will be the first to feel the impact of the lower milk payout, Fonterra warns.

The payout has fallen below $5 to $4.70 per kilogram of milksolids – down from $5.30/kg.

It’s the third time Fonterra has lowered its farmgate milk price since the opening forecast for the 2014/15 season of $7, announced in June.

The federation’s chairman, Andrew Hoggard, said it would be midway through next year before farmers felt the impact of the reduced payout. . .

Small dairy farms can still be profitable – Keith Woodford:

Last week I wrote about the changing scale of dairying. Farms are getting bigger and they will continue to do so, driven by the combined power of scale and financial leverage.

Unfortunately the title I supplied for that article (‘The changing scale of dairy’) was changed in the Sunday Star Times to ‘Dairy is all about scale’. This title implied that there was no future for small dairy farms. However, those of us working with farmers know that small farms can indeed be profitable, and there are many factors other than scale that influence that profitability.

The false impression in last week’s Sunday Star Times article was further compounded by a headline sentence, inserted by editorial staff, that there were 1900 farms with 4.8 million cows. The correct number for 2013, as stated in the article itself, is 11,900 farms. . .

Asian markets fuelling growth for NZ mussel industry:

New Zealand’s iconic Greenshell mussels are proving a hit with consumers in emerging Asian economies and fuelling export growth for the sector according to peak governing body Aquaculture New Zealand (AQNZ).

“Asia can’t get enough New Zealand Greenshell mussels,” AQNZ Chief Executive Gary Hooper said.
“The popularity is driven by the quality, purity, taste, health properties and the reputation of the product. Consumers deliberately seek out premium New Zealand farmed mussels because they know they come from pristine waters, are handled with integrity and are guaranteed safe products they can trust.” . .

 

Forest safety brain trainer for Tree fallers – Switchback’s Steven Falk joins International Safety Conference:

The Forest Industry Engineering Association (FIEA) is pleased to announce that forestry teamwork expert Steven Falk from British Columbia, Canada has been confirmed as a keynote speaker for it’s flagship forest safety conference series March 2015. The summit runs at Rotorua’s Distinction Hotel on 3-4th March and Bayview Eden Hotel in Melbourne on 10-11th March.

Steven Falk’s team of trainers at Switchback has worked with manual tree fallers in British Columbia for many years. He reports, “Our feedback shows that 96% of participants thank us for the training/coaching and express a desire for their families to be able to participate in further Switchback training.” . .


Rural round-up

April 8, 2014

A taste of Waitaki –  Pam Jones:

Pam Jones travels a create-your-own wine and food trail in Waitaki Valley and gives the region top marks.

There is no formal wine and food trail in Waitaki Valley but it is not hard to create your own.

Take a trip from Omarama to Kurow and back to Oamaru and you will discover pinot noirs and aromatics that knock your socks off with their flavours and minerality.

Then add some gourmet treats or rustic farmers’ fare on the side.

It is a recipe for a wonderful day of wining and dining, or stay the night at places along the way to turn it into a multiday sojourn.

We start our loop at the Ladybird Hill Cafe, Restaurant and Winery in Omarama, tucked to the side at the southern entrance of the busy crossroads town. . .

Edendale Nursery sold to large forestry biotech – Sally Rae:

Forestry biotech company ArborGen has expanded its stable of nurseries with the acquisition of Edendale Nursery in Southland.

ArborGen, in which NZX-listed Rubicon has a 31.67% stake, is the largest supplier of seedlings in New Zealand.

It sells up to 25 million trees annually, predominantly in the North Island, and owns five production nurseries, two seed orchards, and a manufacturing facility for the production of radiata varietal seedlings. . . .

Making horseshoe among Young Farmers tasks – Sally Rae:

When Sonja Dobbie entered the North Otago district final of the ANZ Young Farmer Contest, she did not expect to do well.

The competition was held at Totara Estate, near Oamaru, last November and members of her Five Forks club encouraged each other to enter to ensure good representation.

But Miss Dobbie (23), a first-time entrant, finished third behind Marshall Smith (Upper Waitaki Young Farmers) and Steven Smit (Glenavy-Waimate), ensuring her a place in this month’s Aorangi regional final. . .

Sustainable, High-Performing Dairy Operation Collects Supreme Award In 2014 Northland Ballance Farm Environment Awards:

Okaihau dairy farmers Roger and Jane Hutchings are the Supreme winners of the 2014 Northland Ballance Farm Environment Awards.

Judges described the Hutchings’ 680-cow business in the Bay Of Islands, Lodore Farm Ltd, as a very sustainable high-input system which is profitable across all aspects of the operation.

“There is a clear balance between the financial performance of the operation and the environmental and social aspects.”  . . .

 Beef + Lamb New Zealand appoints top genetics positions:

Beef + Lamb New Zealand has appointed a Chairman and General Manager to run the new entity Beef + Lamb New Zealand Genetics.

Former Landcorp CEO and Massey University Chancellor Chris Kelly will chair the Beef + Lamb New Zealand Genetics Board and Graham Alder the former Genetics Business Manager of Zoetis, has been appointed General Manager of Beef + Lamb New Zealand Genetics.

The appointments follow the successful vote at the Beef + Lamb New Zealand Annual Meeting to combine the organisation’s current genetics investments. This means Sheep Improvement Ltd (the national sheep genetic dataset), the Beef + Lamb New Zealand Central Progeny Test and Ovita, with added investment in beef genetics, come together with government funds to create the new entity Beef + Lamb New Zealand Genetics. . .

More success for PGP programmes:

Primary Industries Minister Nathan Guy is welcoming success by three Primary Growth Partnership (PGP) programmes this week, including an award nomination for a revolutionary seafood programme.

“The Precision Seafood Harvesting Programme has been nominated for a KiwiNet Research & Business Partnership Award. This is fitting recognition for a programme that could revolutionise the global fishing industry.

“The programme is developing new sustainable fishing technology that will allow fish to be landed on fishing boats alive, and in perfect condition, while safely releasing small fish and other species.

“The potential economic and environmental benefits of this are huge, and it’s no surprise it is attracting so much attention. This is a $52 million project with funding coming from both industry and government.” .

Another PGP programme – Shellfish Production and Technology New Zealand Ltd (SPATnz) – has also reached a milestone in selective breeding of greenshell mussels. . .

Telecom’s expanding mobile network connects locals in the Far North:

Locals and visitors to Houhora, Pukenui and the coastline north to Rarawa Bay may notice a boost in mobile coverage in the area, with Telecom announcing today that it has invested more than $175,000 on improved coverage to the region.

Telecom’s investment in the Houhora Central Rural Broadband Initiative (RBI) site responds to the increasing demand for mobile coverage in the area and will give locals and visitors added access to voice, mobile broadband and text services over the Telecom mobile network, which has been built specifically for smart phones.

The improved mobile coverage is part of Telecom’s commitment to open up access to mobile data and applications for rural communities. . .

New Zealand seafood goes online in China promotion:

New Zealand Trade and Enterprise (NZTE) has joined forces for the first time with China’s most popular business-to-consumer online shopping platform Tmall.com, to promote New Zealand seafood in a week-long campaign.

The promotion with Tmall.com will take place between 9-15 April, allowing Chinese shoppers to buy live seafood fresh from the sea in New Zealand, then have it packaged and air freighted to Shanghai within 36 hours. Within 72 hours, the seafood orders will be delivered to Chinese consumers across the country. The New Zealand products available for sale include paua, greenshell mussels and Bluff and Pacific oysters.

The ability to sell and deliver live seafood to Chinese consumers is a significant milestone. A similar Tmall.com campaign with Alaskan seafood last year resulted in a total of 50 metric tonnes supplied to Chinese consumers. . .

The ‘B’ word – Mad Bush Farm:

Yesterday I read the forecast for Northland and I used the “B” word. It’s now Autumn, and yet again we’re in a drought. So is the Waikato and things are looking rather grim where rainfall goes. I’m letting the Toyota crew there say the “B” word on my behalf, and the rest of the rural crew out there looking up at the skies and praying it rains and soon!


Never let a chance go by

December 20, 2012

Twenty people have been poisoned after eating shellfish collected in the Bay of Plenty area in the past week.

And Aquaculture New Zealand puts out a media release:

Farmed New Zealand Greenshell Mussels and Pacific Oysters on sale at local supermarkets and seafood retailers are delicious, nutritious and 100 per cent safe to eat.

Aquaculture New Zealand chairman Peter Vitasovich has assured New Zealanders they can enjoy locally farmed shellfish these holidays with absolute confidence.

“New Zealand marine farmers operate one of the world’s strictest seafood quality assurance programmes, meeting the standards set by the New Zealand Ministry for Primary Industries, United States Food and Drug Administration and the European Union,” Mr Vitasovich said.

“Both the shellfish, and the water in which they are grown are rigorously tested before harvesting takes place.

“Fresh, sustainable, delicious, nutritious – Greenshell Mussels and Pacific Oysters are the taste of summer, proudly grown in your back yard.

“New Zealanders can enjoy farmed mussels and oysters knowing they are eating the safest shellfish in the world.”

Coincidence?

I don’t think so and that’s not a criticism.

Good businesses never let a chance go by.


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