Still not enough PPE

15/04/2020

The message from the top is that New Zealand has enough personal protective equipment (PPE) for people who need it.

The message further down the chain contradicts that:

Newshub has obtained more evidence of the gulf between the Ministry of Health and nurses about what’s happening on the frontline with masks and personal protective equipment (PPE).

An audio recording between a charge nurse and staff member reveals the reality of the frustration heath workers face in their efforts to wear masks to protect themselves from coronavirus.

“If you are telling me that you are insisting on wearing a mask at work, I don’t know what to say – we are stopping other people doing that,” the nurse can be heard telling the staff member.

“We are directed that staff can’t wear masks.” . . 

These concerns are not isolated to just one hospital; a nurse at Burwood Hospital, for instance – where six of New Zealand’s nine COVID-19 deaths have occured – says staff even on the COVID-19 ward do not have adequate protection.

They’re on the frontline of the COVID-19 crisis and want to do all they can to protect themselves and their patients, but requests for masks are being blocked by their managers.  . .

A major healthcare provider says it’s struggling to get even a week’s worth of PPE:

Green Cross Health is a provider of primary health care services through pharmacies, GP clinics and home health care and community nursing.

Group chief executive Rachael Newfield said they were struggling to get PPE for their community health division.

“We undertake 60,000 personal cares, which are close contact carers looking after an individual in their home every week.

“To date, from the 20 DHBs, we have received just 30,000 masks, so that isn’t enough to last a week, if we allow our staff to feel safe and follow the latest guidance,” she said.

Newfield said the amount of PPE they could receive also differed between individual DHBs, and stocks from local suppliers were also tight.

When the message to the public is to protect ourselves why doesn’t the health service have enough PPE for all the staff who need it?

Yesterday a third of people with Covid-19 were health workers.

The number of health workers in New Zealand with Covid-19 has jumped by nearly 60 percent in just four days.

On Wednesday, 64 healthcare workers had contracted the virus but that figure had leapt to 101 by Sunday.

Of the 110 new confirmed and probable Covid-19 cases in the intervening period, 37 of them – more than a third – were health staff. . . 

Not all The health workers contracted the disease through work but that some did makes it even more important that all of them have PPE when and where they need it.

Director-General of Health Ashley Bloomfield said the situation was worrying.

“I’m concerned about any case in a healthcare worker, particularly where it happens in the workplace,” he said.

“We’ve got some information about the cases that are healthcare workers and what I’ve asked the team for particular analysis of is, of the cases that have happened in the workplace, how was it that they were infected? So was that through being part of caring for someone with Covid-19 or was it because they are part of a cluster where they may be a close contact of another staff member?” . . .

And was it because staff don’t have the PPE they need?

The incidence of disease in health workers takes the edge off the hope that comes from the decline in the number of new cases.

That downward trend will have to continue before the government decides to let us out of the level 4 lockdown and giving health workers the PPE they need will help that.

Yesterday Treasury outlined various scenarios showing  the economic impact of the lockdown:

Treasury scenarios released by the Government show unemployment could reach up to 26 percent if the coronavirus lockdown is extended beyond four weeks.

The data shows the range of scenarios Treasury has predicted for the New Zealand economy, based on assumptions of different amounts of time under the four COVID-19 alert levels.

The scenarios show that unemployment can be kept below 10 percent, and return to 5 percent next year, if the Government is willing to provide additional financial support. . .

The economic and social costs of the lockdown are already too high.

We can not afford to have it extended, especially if the extension was due to an increase in infections because health workers don’t have the PPE they need to keep themselves safe.


Rural round-up

18/11/2014

Aussies eye fairer fight with NZ dairying  – Matthew Cranston & Tim Binsted:

As an exporter of 40,000 litres of milk to China a year, Lemontree Dairy has had to wait 11 years for the same treatment in China as New Zealand dairies.

“We have been fighting with one hand behind our back for years now with New Zealand but with this free trade agreement being equal to New Zealand will make the fight fairer,” said director James McNamee.

“It’s about time they got it over the line.”

Australia’s free trade agreement with China is set to provide A$630 million in savings from 2016 to 2025 as the tariffs are wound back, according to Australian Dairy Industry Council. . .

Black market for messy mutton  – Tracey Chatterton:

Sheep carcasses are being dumped on Hastings streets as thieves continue to target livestock.

Meat continues to be sold on the black market despite suspects having already been arrested in recent months, Flaxmere community constable Greg Andrew said.

Ratepayers were footing the bill for the mess sheep rustlers were making.

Hastings District Council contractors collected and cleaned up the dumped carcasses and offal at a cost of between $100 and $300 per carcass. . .

Milk price variability – what it means for dairy farm businesses  – Grant Rowan:

It may not appear to be, but the milk price is trending upwards.

It is also becoming more and more volatile, with the past 18 months a good case in point. In May 2013 global Whole Milk Powder (WMP) prices peaked at US$5600/tonne. The average WMP price at Fonterra’s most recent Global Dairy Trade auction was US$2522/tonne.

The question for anyone interested in the health of NZ’s biggest export industry is how are dairy farmers faring?

This edition of Farm Investment Insight explores milk price variability and the tools farmers can use to generate operating profits in times of negative price shocks. . . .

Is Our Food Safety System as Strong as We Think. Private Sector vs Public Sector – Milking on the Moove:

Is our food safety system as robust as we think it is? And are we better served by the public or private sector?

Last week I blogged about my issues getting the mobile cowshed evaluated by inspectors.

The way the food safety system works, is the government agency via The Ministry of Primary Industries (MPI) set the food standards. When a company sets up a food business, the verification services are provided by the private sector.

In New Zealand we have AsureQuality, which is a state owned enterprise, but it operates as a for profit business. There seems to be only two other providers, Eurofins & SGS in NZ who can offer dairy evaluation services. . .

Cut fees for Ag degrees:

GETTING YOUNG people into agribusiness is critical for New Zealand’s future, says ANZ chief economist Cameron Bagrie.

 He told the recent Zespri conference that he is concerned to see the right people enter the agri sector in the numbers required. For example, the kiwifruit industry will soon be producing 30 million more trays of product and will need more people to cope with that trend.

Bagrie is convinced that most young people do not understand the long term future they could enjoy in some primary industries. . .

$18mln payday for Rural Women NZ in sale to Green Cross Health – Jonathan Underhill:

Green Cross Health has agreed to pay around $18 million for Access Homehealth, a not-for-profit home healthcare services company owned by a grass-roots charitable organisation, Rural Women New Zealand, which will gain representation on the Green Cross board as part of the deal.

The purchase will add to earnings immediately, said Green Cross, formerly known as PharmacyBrands and the owner of the Life Pharmacy and Unichem pharmacy chains. Access has annual sales of about $85 million and employs about 4,000 people, the Auckland-based company said.

The purchase price, which includes assumed debt, will be funded from existing cash and bank funding, Green Cross said. . .

 Grow your own with a hand from Ballance science:

With cashflows tight on dairy farms, pasture comes out on top as the cheapest feed source and getting the best grass for the least cost can be achieved with a hand from science.

Ballance Science Manager, Aaron Stafford says the “grow your own” approach of using nitrogen fertiliser to boost pasture growth provides the most cost-effective supplementary feed, but with cash-strapped farmers working within very tight budgets, they want to be confident of a good pasture response to money spent on nitrogen.

“There is nothing more frustrating than seeing a poor or variable pasture response nitrogen fertiliser to boost feed availability. We can help farmers get the best results by enabling them to tailor application rates to areas which are likely to produce the highest pasture response.” . . .


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