Rural round-up

October 10, 2016

Alliance appoints Stacy to new role :

Alliance Group has appointed Heather Stacy to the newly created role of general manager livestock and shareholder services.

Ms Stacy, who starts work on November 21, has held senior leadership roles,  including as general manager of international farming with Fonterra New Zealand, and  general manager milk supply with Fonterra Australia.

She was previously the executive director of United Dairy Farmers (the dairy sector’s equivalent of Federated Farmers) and has worked in the red meat industry for Meat and Livestock Australia (Australia’s equivalent of Beef and Lamb NZ). . . 

Off to Oz to contest Wayleggo Cup:

Taieri dog trialling enthusiast Graham White, pictured above with his dogs Moss and Ladd, is off to Australia for the annual Transtasman dog trial test.

Mr White, who is president of the New Zealand Sheep Dog Trial Association, is team manager and also the New Zealand judge. . .

Contracting firm changing hands – Sally Rae:

Geoff Scurr and Blair Skevington have a few things in common.

Not only do they live in East Otago, but they showed entrepreneurial streaks from a young age, and shared a passion for the contracting industry.

Mr Scurr was just 16 when he bought his first bulldozer, an International BTD6, for $1800 — a substantial sum for a teenager.

Two years later, he bought a contracting business in Waikouaiti.

Mr Skevington bought the then-closed North Western Hotel in Palmerston when he was 19.

Being underage, he had to find a business partner with a bar manager’s licence to help him reopen it. . . 

Farm systems ‘status quo’ despite forecast milk price:

Dairy farmers Rachel and Kenneth Short say despite a potential increase in forecast milk price, they won’t be making any changes to their farm budget.

The couple are equity partners with Louis and Barbara Kuriger on a 440 cow, 168ha Taranaki farm run under a very simple, low input system which operates year-in, year-out with farm working expenses (FWE) of $1.90-$2.20/kg MS. Production for 2016/17 is expected to be 140,000kg MS.

“We’ve run the same financial budget since 2010. We never make changes to the budget – even at a high payout, our farm working expenses are identical to what they are this year,” says Rachel. . . 

While most African farms are organic @OxfamNZ @GreenpeaceNZ @SteffanBrowning – Utopia:

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Africa’s urgent need for agricultural modernization is being rudely ignored. When elite urbanites in rich countries began turning away from science-based farming in the 1980s, external assistance for agriculture in poor countries was cut sharply. As late as 1980 the U.S. Agency for International Development was still devoting 25 percent of its official development assistance to the modernization of farming, but today it is just 1 percent. . . 

Farmers warned not to plant left-over contaminated fodder beet seed:

The Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) is cautioning farmers not to plant left-over seed from any of the six lines of fodder beet seed imported last year and known to be contaminated with velvetleaf.

MPI is working with industry players and regional councils to manage the incursion of the pest weed resulting from the importation of the contaminated seed.

Response Incident Controller David Yard says there are hundreds of properties around New Zealand that have velvetleaf on them and we don’t want any more. . . 

Forest Enterprises now licensed:

One of New Zealand’s leading forest investment and management companies has been licensed.

On 3 October, Forest Enterprises Limited was licensed under the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013 to manage Managed Investment Schemes (excluding managed funds) which are primarily invested in forestry assets.

Managing Director Steve Wilton describes the licence as a “milestone” for the company.

He says Forest Enterprises was, on 5 October, one of just two forestry investment specialists that had been licensed out of a total of 51 licensed MIS managers. Most of the others are managers of managed funds. . . 

#GMO the most regulated & tested product in agricultural history:

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(Click the link on the headline above for more)


Rural round-up

June 18, 2015

Winning vet ever on the go – Sally Rae:

Oamaru-based veterinarian Dave Robertson has been described as ”someone who lives and breathes sheep and beef”.

Mr Robertson, a partner at the Veterinary Centre, has received the inaugural sheep and beef cattle vet of the year award from the sheep and beef cattle branch of the New Zealand Veterinary Association. . .

Never too busy for trialling – Sally Rae:

Newly elected New Zealand Sheep Dog Trial Association president Graham White may have a big year ahead of him – but he will still fit in some dog trialling.

”Too right”, Mr White (64), who already has several judging appointments for the next season, said. His involvement with dog trials spans more than 40 years and he has been vice president of the association for the past four years. . .

Tech expos for everybody – Sally Rae:

From the technophobes to the techno savvy, all farmers will be catered for at technology expos in Otago this month.

The Beef and Lamb New Zealand farming for profit technology expo is being held in Tapanui on June 25 and Alexandra on June 26.

The focus was on profiling innovative technologies designed to make farming more efficient, profitable and easier, AgFirst Otago agricultural business consultant Nicola Chisholm said. . .

Scientists reveal underpinning of drought tolerance in plants – American Society of Plant Biologists

Regions all over the globe are suffering from severe drought, which threatens crop production worldwide. This is especially worrisome given the need to increase, not just maintain, crop yields to feed the increasing global population. Over the course of evolution, plants have developed mechanisms to adapt to periods of inadequate water, and as any gardener can tell you, some species are better able to handle drought than others. Accordingly, scientists have invested much effort to understand how plants respond to drought stress and what can be done to increase the drought tolerance of economically important plants. . .

 

Africa must modernise its farms in order to fight hunger and poverty – Mark Lynas:

Africa desperately needs agricultural modernisation. With the most rapidly growing population in the world and hundreds of millions still suffering malnutrition, African leaders cannot afford to close the door to innovation.

Poverty is endemic and “yield gaps” mean that African farmers commonly harvest less than a tenth of the global average in maize and other crops.

Part of the problem has been political resistance to adopting new and improved technologies, particularly in seed breeding. Some of this unwillingness has been home-grown, but much has been imported to Africa by rich-country NGOs with a colonialist ideological agenda that see poverty as dignified and want to keep farmers permanently trapped in subsistence lifestyles. . .

Farmside to offer rural 4G:

Faster 4G internet is coming to parts of New Zealand previously denied access to the latest technology, and Farmside is happy to help roll it out.

“We are the leading rural supplier of 3G through the Government’s Rural Broadband Initiative (RBI) that gets in to some of the country’s most hard-to-reach places. Now Farmside, through Vodafone, can offer this next generation technology in selected areas,” says General Manager of Sales and Marketing, Stuart Cooper. . .

 

 


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