Rural round-up

March 12, 2018

Thousands of trees hide the scars of Cyclone Bola on Mangaroa Station at Tokomaru Bay – Kate Taylor:

‘It was like a bloody atomic bomb had gone off.’ An East Coast farmer looks back at Cyclone Bola. Kate Taylor continues her series marking the storm’s 30th anniversary.

Sam Reeves loves farming Mangaroa Station today but can only imagine its devastation at the hands of Cyclone Bola.

At age 27, he wasn’t born when the historic storm hit the East Coast of the North Island in 1988.

But he is the same age previous owner Graeme Williams was when Cyclone Bola dumped more than 900mm of rain on the Tokomaru Bay farm in just two days.

“When I went to bed on the night of the 7th it was pouring down with rain,” Williams says. . .

More weight for ag emissions tax – Neal Wallace:

Another unequivocal message has been delivered that agriculture needs to shoulder a greater share of the efforts and costs of reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

In January Climate Change Minister James Shaw signalled agriculture could be included in the Emissions Trading Scheme and this week the Parliamentary Commissioner for the Environment Simon Upton said climate change policy cannot ignore agricultural greenhouse gas emissions.

New Zealand has committed to cut greenhouse gas emissions to 30% below 2005 levels by 2030 but Upton said climate change policies lack bite for fear they would compromise competitiveness. . . 

Rabobank New Zealand Agribusiness Monthly March 2018:

The Agribusiness Monthly provides timely information and analysis on agricultural conditions, commodity price updates and commentary on the latest sectoral trends and developments.

Key Highlights:

Dairy
Can the price rally survive the EU Spring peak?

Beef
Is there potential for near term price falls? . . .

Industrialised meat backlash to favour NZ sheep and beef farmers – Bill Wright:

The planets seem to be aligning for sheep and beef farmers this season.

We have had that rare combination of excellent growing conditions and strong prices for both beef and lamb – prime and store.

Adding to what has been a positive start to the year was the release of a Beef + Lamb New Zealand- commissioned report on alternative proteins.

The research showed that despite the emergence of alternative proteins, the future for this country’s grass-fed red meat is healthy. Internationally, consumers are seeking red meat produced without hormones or antibiotics and to the highest standards of animal welfare – and NZ farm systems tick all of these boxes. . . 

Kansas City’s agriculture roots run deep: Cowtown turned animal health & technology centre:

At the bend in the Missouri River on grass covered flats if you listen close you might hear echoes of the past; hoofbeats, whistling, spurs jangling, the slap of leather and the high pitched zzzzzz of a lariat. Cowboys, dust covered and bone tired, riding weary cowponies barely heard over the bawling of thousands of Texas steers, “Hold’em here boys, the drives bout over.”

Kansas City sprouted from its agricultural heritage as a Cowtown. The transition to a center for animal health, education, and technology seems only natural for a town that for hundreds of years has had millions of animals pass through this gateway to the west. . .

 


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