Rural round-up

March 15, 2015

Farmax conference to focus farmers and rural consultants on 2025 export goals:

Decision support software company, Farmax, believes it has a key tool pastoral farmers can use to help the agriculture industry achieve its goal of doubling exports by 2025. The company’s 2015 conference will focus on helping farmers and rural consultants gain confidence in the tools they need to achieve this objective.

Minister for Primary Industries Hon Nathan Guy will open the conference at Mac’s Function Centre in Wellington on 7-8 May.

Beef + Lamb New Zealand chief executive Dr Scott Champion, OVERSEER general manager Caroline Read and Landcorp Farm Operations general manager Graeme Mulligan will also present over the two-day event. . .

Forestry leases returned to Māori owners:

Associate Primary Industries Minister Jo Goodhew joined Māori owners and the community in Northland today to celebrate the surrender of a 740 hectare forestry lease.

The ceremony included the felling of the final trees to mark the end of what was originally a 99 year Crown lease. The trees are to be replanted by the landowner, Parengarenga A Incorporation.

“Partnership between the Incorporation and the Crown has been important to the development of forestry in the Far North,” Mrs Goodhew says. “By stabilising moving sand on the Aupouri peninsula this once unproductive land has been developed into a productive forest. . .

Drought may bite olive harvest:

A Wairarapa olive grower says the extremely dry conditions are taking a toll on trees and will bite into this year’s harvest.

Last year a record olive harvest was recorded in many parts of the country, helped by hot, dry summer conditions.

Olive New Zealand’s president, Andrew Taylor, said it was too early to say what this year’s harvest would be like from region to region, although it was likely that some growers will get lighter crops than the record amount last year.

But grower Ray Lilley, who owns White Rocks Olives at Martinborough, said the weather conditions this season would reduce the harvest, especially on younger trees. . .

Open Country posts record annual profit on surge in sales, sees ‘strong’ 2015:

(BusinessDesk) – Open Country Dairy, the dairy manufacturer controlled by Talley’s Group, reported a record profit for 2014 as revenue growth outpaced rising cost of sales, and said it expects a “strong” result in 2015.

Profit was $29.8 million in the 12 months ended Sept. 30, 2014, from $18.2 million in a 14-month period a year earlier, according to the Auckland-based company’s annual report. Open Country changed its balance date to Sept. 30 from July 31 in 2013.

Sales jumped to $908 million from $635 million, while cost of sales rose to $858 million from $597 million, allowing the company to increase gross profit by 31 percent. The 2014 year took in a season in which farmers received a record payout for their milk, while global dairy prices tumbled in the second half from near their highest levels in seven years. . .

Steak of Origin Underway:

Beef farmers nationwide are waiting in anticipation to see if their steaks will be named amongst the best in New Zealand.

The Beef + Lamb New Zealand Steak of Origin competition, supported by Zoetis, received over 300 entries from farmers, retailers, wholesalers and foodservice suppliers hoping to take out the title of the nation’s most tender and tasty steak.

Entries will now go on to be scientifically tested at Carne Technologies with colour and tenderness results determining the top 20% from each class, which will be announced as semi-finalists. . .

 

Villa Maria named fourth most admired wine brand in the world and first in New Zealand:

Today, Drinks International, one of the most trusted and respected global drink journals, named Villa Maria as the fourth most admired wine brand in the world, the only New Zealand winery to make the top 10 list. More than 200 of the world’s top masters of wine, sommeliers, educators and journalists took part in the annual poll, which pits wine brands from all regions, styles and qualities against each other.

The Academy of Masters of Wine, sommeliers, educators and journalists were tasked with critiquing and recognising the ‘Most Admired Wine Brands’ in the world and measured against the following list: . .


Rural round-up

June 1, 2014

Alliance director ‘a real Kiwi chick’  – Sally Rae:

Alliance Group’s newest independent director Vanessa Stoddart describes the meat industry as being ”at the heart” of New Zealand. She talked to agribusiness reporter Sally Rae during the company’s inaugural Pure South conference in Queenstown this week.

Vanessa Stoddart loves transforming big companies and cultures.

Last month, the Auckland-based businesswoman with an impressive resume was appointed to the board of Alliance Group as an independent director. . .

Bigger ‘not better’in dairy industry – Sally Rae:

Big is not necessarily better.

That was the message from Alliance Group independent director Graeme Milne to suppliers attending the company’s inaugural Pure South conference in Queenstown this week.

Mr Milne, who has a 30-year involvement in the dairy industry, was chief executive of the New Zealand Dairy Group prior to the formation of Fonterra.

Among various other directorships, he is chairman of Mid Canterbury dairy-processor Synlait. He was appointed to Alliance Group’s board last year. . .

One woman and her dog  – Sahiban Kanwal:

Nicky Thompson believes you have got to have the hunger to be better than the best.

Women taking part in sheep dog trial championships in New Zealand was unheard of 50 years ago.

These days, however, Thompson, from Omihi in North Canterbury, is living proof of an ever-changing farming community.

Thompson is one of the competitors at the New Zealand and South Island Sheep Dog Trial Championships at Waihi Station, near Geraldine, throughout this week. . .

Alliance considering pool payment – Lynda Gray:

A pool payment – the first in two years – could be on the cards for Alliance shareholders.

The cautiously optimistic promise was delivered by Alliance chairman Murray Taggart on the first day of the meat company’s inaugural supplier conference in Queenstown.

Also announced was the planned rollout on October 1 of a new yield payment system based on different price premiums for the primal shoulder, leg, and loin cuts. . .

More to Mt Hutt than just snow:

Iconic is an overused word these days, but occasionally it is justified – as in the case of Mt Hutt Station and not just because it covers the lower slopes of the Mid-Canterbury plains’ most visible landmark.

Its status – both nationally and internationally – is in no small part because of Mt Hutt Station’s owners, the Hood family. Because of the Hoods, Mt Hutt Station is now indelibly linked with large-scale deer farming.

For more than 35 years the property has been developed and farmed by the Hood family after Keith and his late brother Doug purchased the station in 1978. By the early 1990s, the station that had once run up to 14,000 ewes, was virtually totally deer. The station is now farmed by Keith and his wife Dennise, along with their son Bruce and daughter-in- law Becky. . .

It's World Milk Day today! To join the global celebrations we will share some fun facts about #milk today with you. Around the world, 87,717 glasses of milk are consumed every second of every day. Amazing, isn’t it? Like if you agree! #fonterra #funfacts #worldmilkday

Confidence expressed in industry’s future :

New Zealand’s largest deer farmer, Landcorp Farming, has confidence in the future of the deer industry, said its general manager of farm operations.

Addressing the Deer Industry New Zealand conference in Methven recently, Graeme Mulligan said the company was confident in the future of deer farming.

While Landcorp’s reliance on dairying would grow considerably, it was still keen to be in the deer industry.

Deer provided a diversity of product mix to the business and featured in its revenue strategy. . .


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