Commissioner for SDHB?

June 9, 2015

The Southern District Health Board may be replaced by a Commissioner:

The board has until Thursday to respond to Health Minister Dr Jonathan Coleman’s proposal to consider appointing a commissioner under the New Zealand Public Health and Disability Act, it was revealed yesterday.

A commissioner would have the powers and functions of the board, except for procedural aspects relating to meetings, a letter from Dr Coleman to chairman Joe Butterfield says.

”Based on the board’s previous history of failure to deliver on its annual plan expectations, I do not have confidence that the current governance arrangements are suitable for overseeing the strategic plan or delivering on the changes required in Southern DHB,” he wrote. . .

The SDHB might not like this but the boards of the smaller hospitals it funds will be relieved.

The proposed action follows months of uncertainty after Dr Coleman confirmed in February he wanted to replace Mr Butterfield with a new chairman, but no appointment was made.

In the meantime, proposed cuts to head off a projected $42million deficit in 2015-16 met opposition and put pressure on Dr Coleman and local National MPs.

About 1700 people attended meetings in Central Otago last month to protest against possible reductions to Dunstan Hospital services.

George Berry, chair of Waitaki District Health Services said the proposed cuts would result in a serious downgrade of Oamaru Hospital.

The cuts to funding of Oamaru, Dunstan, Balclutha and Gore hospitals would be serious for them and make only a small difference to the SDHB’s deficit.

They’d also add to costs in Dunedin Hospital when patients unable to be treated locally were transferred to the city.

I was deputy chair of WDHS from its formation in 1998 until 2005.

It and the boards of the other rural hospitals have had an on-going struggle to get their fair share of funds and the financial situation of the SDHB has deteriorated.

Sacking the board and replacing it with a commissioner is a serious step but one which must be taken for the security of health services in the south.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Too clean and too dirty

August 18, 2008

Dunedin Hopsital is closed to visitors and all but emergency, mental health and maternity patients because of an outbreak of norovirus.

It’s only a couple of months since the gastric illness swept through Gore Hospital and other hopsitals, resthomes and schools have also had outbreaks.

Southland principals say one of the reasons the infection spreads is that people don’t stay at home when they are ill. I wonder if another cause is lowering standards of basic hygiene and an increase in practices which reduce immunity.

My mother was a nurse and when I was a child we weren’t allowed to come to the meal table until we had washed our hands – and washed them properly. Now people tend to graze rather than eat meals and from my observations few bother to wash their hands before eating.

But it’s not just pre-dining hygiene that’s lacking. A New Zealand Food Safety Authority  survey showed that only 7.8% of people followed the 20/20 rule for hand washing after going to the loo – 20 seconds washing with soap and hot water and 20 seconds drying with a clean towel. But worse nearly 10% of women and 20% of men didn’t bother washing their hands at all.

Then we have the other extreme where life is too clean.  We use antibacterial cleaning products which may lead to the development of superbugs from the .1% that aren’t zapped by the cleaner; children aren’t allowed to play in the mud or with animals; and we become so fastidious we’re not exposed to germs which help build our immunity.

Maybe we’d be healthier if we  stopped worrying about clean dirt and became more particular about the dirty dirt.

If  Mum was here she’d recommend we get back to the basics of housekeeping with hot, soapy water and elbow grease; wash our hands more thoroughly and more often; and stay at home when we’re ill so we keep our bugs to ourselves.


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