Rural round-up

August 25, 2016

Is it normal to tie a cow to a tractor?:

When a concerned citizen saw a cow chained to a tractor in Southland, they thought it was odd enough to ring police about.

But instead of being an animal welfare issue, the case turned out to be a common(ish) farming practice.

It was Sunday afternoon when the police station phone rang – the caller having just seen the bovine suspended in its field along Gore’s Waikaka Rd. Officers were told the animal couldn’t get food or water, and the owner was nowhere to be seen.

The matter was referred to animal control.

Though what looked like cruelty was in fact the opposite, the farmer says – insisting it’s a life-saving measure. . . 

Forestry industry must remain vigilant about health and safety:

WorkSafe New Zealand says the latest forestry death in Hawkes Bay is a sad reminder to the industry of the need to remain vigilant about health and safety.

Monday’s death follows three earlier confirmed forestry fatalities so far this year, and is the second death in the Pohakura Forest.

“It is obviously concerning to see two deaths in the one forest within a matter of months. Any deaths are a tragedy for family, friends and co-workers and the wider community,” says WorkSafe’s chief executive Gordon MacDonald. . . 

Picton predator-free group targets less than 5 per cent pests by 2020 – Mike Watson:

A Picton group that pre-empted the Government’s predator-free push by 12 months plans to create a line of defence surrounding the entire town.

Volunteer group Picton Dawn Chorus has already started setting 150 traps, or a trap every 100 metres, on public walkways in the town’s Victoria Domain to kill rats, stoats and possums.

The next step is to set more than 700 traps in private gardens and outlying coastal and bush areas, eventually covering an expected 2000 hectares. . . 

Videos Highlight Sustainable Deer Farming:

NZ Landcare Trust has been working with deer farmers to capture examples of excellent sustainable land and water management from around the country. This information has been distilled into fifteen short videos that are now available to view online. The final five videos from Waikato and Southland join the ten previously released (Hawke’s Bay and Canterbury) to create an informative video based resource.

NZ Landcare Trust’s Regional Coordinator Janet Gregory said, “I’d like to thank the deer farmers who welcomed us onto their properties. They have taken the time to share some of the good management practices that they have put in place on their respective properties, demonstrating a proactive approach to addressing issues around the environment and water quality.” . . 

Interest in dairy sheep builds :

The dairy sheep industry is gaining traction as a viable alternative to traditional land uses, say rural property experts.

As the ability to convert to dairying faces greater challenges on environmental and economic fronts, the option of leaving the land as a milking sheep unit is coming into focus for farmers in regions like Southland and central North Island.

Invercargill-based Bayleys rural consultant Hayden McCallum says his patch of New Zealand’s rural landscape offers some significant opportunities for milking sheep, given its well established sheep sector and strong pastoral property base. . . 

Farm life in Taradise – Brad Markham:

Have you ever slipped your hand inside a cow having difficulty calving, felt two large front feet, and thought ‘I’m going to need a lot of lube to get this one out’? I’ve had to deliver a few monster calves this winter. Several were almost half my body weight. I often joke that semen from a certain bull with a reputation for producing huge calves, should come with a complementary container of lube. . . 

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Rural round-up

April 6, 2016

Marine farming rubbish removed during beach clean-up – Mike Watson:

Marine farmers have recovered almost 20 tonnes of rubbish, much of it non-industry related, from Marlborough Sounds and Tasman Bay beaches in the past five years.

The total tonnage from the marine farming industry-led environmental programme was the equivalent of more than two weeks work every month over the past five years by volunteers cleaning up the region’s beaches, a  review of the programme showed.

The programme had been operating since the early 1990s to help clean up beaches in the top of the South Island. . . 

Pondering life and death down on the farm – Joyce Wyllie:

“When you have livestock, you do have dead stock” is a saying I heard often when I was a vet.

It is a farmer’s laconic way of coping with disappointments, sickness and demise of both farm and pet animals. Death is something we face on farms regularly and rural families do learn to deal with it, although it should never become casual or frivolous. Our garden has a cemetery where the white mice are buried, there are RIP white crosses among flowers, and fruit trees planted on top of deceased dogs.

Our children have learnt that life does end. They have experienced grief, understand sadness of loss and have developed respect for death. . . 

Dairy forum focuses on challenges and opportunities:

The outlook for the wider dairy sector including support available for farmers were the focus of an event near Morrinsville attended by Primary Industries Minister Nathan Guy today.

The event brought together farmers and others from the rural business community, including MPI, DairyNZ, Federated Farmers, Rural Support Trusts and the New Zealand Bankers Association who together launched a new brochure outlining various support available for farmers.

“While the medium to long-term outlook for the sector remains strong, our dairy farmers are doing it tough this season. Low global prices are having a real impact on cashflows and farmers are rightly focussing on their business decisions and on-farm costs,” says Mr Guy.. . .

Health and safety must be a priority:

WorkSafe NZ’s chief executive says farmers should place a high priority on health and safety plans rather than doing them at the end of the working week.

Gordon MacDonald’s comments come as the new Health and Safety at Work Act comes into force on April 4. He says the new act should come under the banner of ‘looking after my mates’ and become an important part of any business.

He adds the ‘she’ll be right’ approach has no place in the current environment and shouldn’t have had for the past 20 years under the previous act. . . 

MPI imposes tough restrictions on imported seed:

The Ministry for Primary Industries has imposed tough new border restrictions to stop contaminated seed from entering New Zealand.

The move follows the discovery of velvet leaf in fodder beet seeds imported from Europe. MPI, industry bodies and regional councils are currently responding to an outbreak of the invasive weed in farm properties across the country.

“We already have strong border controls in place to stop contaminated seed from entering New Zealand. The new interim measures will provide another layer of biosecurity until we know exactly how the contaminated fodder beet seeds entered the country,” says Stephen Butcher, MPI Manager Import and Export Plants. . . 

Throw a chop on the barbie in Tokyo

JAPANESE shoppers are not normally known for their appetite for sheepmeat products, but changing consumer trends could see more lamb on their barbecues alongside Australian beef.

Food industry marketers say the world’s biggest importer of red meat (by value) is not only a cosmopolitan marketplace with plenty of scope for new taste trends among younger consumers, Japan also has a growing attraction to barbecued meat. . . 

Fifth Grand Finalist Confirmed in FMG Young Farmer of the Year:

James Hoban is the fifth Grand Finalist to be named in the 2016 FMG Young Farmer of the Year.

James is a 30 year old Sheep and Dairy Support Farmer and Farm Environment Consultant who took first place at the Tasman Regional Final in Rangiora on 2 April

Mr Hoban went home with a prize pack worth over $10,000 including cash, scholarships and products and services from FMG, Massey University, Ravensdown, Meridian Energy, AGMARDT, Silver Fern Farms, Honda, STIHL and Vodafone. James also won the Massey University Agri-growth Challenge. . . 

LIC Jersey bulls make a strong comeback:

LIC’s Jersey Premier Sires bulls have cemented their position at the top of the national Jersey Ranking of Active Sires (RAS) list, released at the weekend.

This is good news for dairy farmers who prefer to get their Jersey inseminations from their farmer-owned co-operative.

Among a range of positive statistics on the Jersey RAS list, LIC has all of the top 5 bulls. It also has 8 of the top 10 and 11 of the top 15 bulls on the Jersey RAS list. Of the 11, 9 are new graduates which illustrates the change in LIC’s momentum. . . 


Rural round-up

March 28, 2016

Onus put on everyone to keep safe on farms – WorkSafe – Brittany Pickett:

The responsibility of farmers to ensure safety on farms remains mostly unaltered with the new health and safety legislation, says WorkSafe NZ chief executive Gordon MacDonald.

The Health and Safety at Work Act comes into effect on April 4.

The new act puts the responsibility onto almost everyone on a farm to ensure the health and safety of themselves and the people around them.

They must be accountable and identify hazards and risks, taking steps to prevent them from happening, and hold regular training and reviews of incidents with frequent health and safety audits. . . 

Resources to back up health and safety laws – Sally Rae:

Helping people through the “demystification” of health and safety is not about having endless ring binders on the shelf gathering dust, WorkSafe chief executive Gordon MacDonald says.

Instead, there are great resources available and implementation of the new Health and Safety at Work Act (HSWA) next week was an opportunity for people to review what their own approach was to health and safety.

For the farming community, it was not a question of “eliminating risks from life or getting obsessed by paper cuts”; it was about stuff that caused life-changing and life-ending injuries to people, Mr MacDonald said. . . 

‘A cool bit of science’ – Sally Rae:

AgResearch scientist Sara Edwards is on a quest to help find out why the reproductive performance of hoggets is so poor.

Dr Edwards is reproduction team leader, based at Invermay, where a hogget trial has been conducted over two years at the research centre’s farm, near Mosgiel.

Much work had been done to try to improve the efficiency of hogget lambing using management practices.

Hoggets produce about half the lambs mature ewes do but the underlying question remained as to what was going wrong, Dr Edwards said. . . 

Life on the ridge of sighs – Kate Taylor:

Adrian Arnold glances at the sky and wonders out loud if the flurry of raindrops will come to anything.

Even the slightest hint of rain is enough to send a farmer scurrying back to the woolshed in the middle of shearing to make sure he has enough sheep under cover – in this case, the remainder of 600 two-tooth ewes due for a campylobacter vaccine after shearing.

Adrian grew up at Kaiwaka, north-east of Napier, and has been farming the family’s 425ha property with wife Kim since 1987. . .

Understanding European dairy – Keith Woodford:

In working out the long term positioning for the New Zealand dairy industry, we have to ask ourselves four big questions:
• What will happen in China?
• What will happen to oil prices?
• What will happen in America?
• What will happen in Europe?
In this article I will focus on Europe.

The need to shed some myths
To understand the fundamental changes that are occurring in European dairy, we need to first shed some myths. Dominant among these myths is that the European industry only survives because of subsidies. . . 

Annual Otago shoot culls 10,000 rabbits:

There are 10,011 fewer pest rabbits on Central Otago farms thanks to the annual Great Easter Bunny Hunt.

The 328 hunters who took part in the annual event assembled in Pioneer Park in Alexandra at midday today for the count and prizegiving and a team called Down South took top honours for a second consecutive year with a kill of 889 rabbits.

Team leader Brett Middleton from Winton says the team has been competing for six years and in four of them it has been in the top five. . . 

Farmers Are Awesome's photo.


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